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Charles N Sublett
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You're welcome! Again, happy birthday!
Toggle Commented Jul 29, 2012 on Happy Don't Be A Dick Day! at WWdN: In Exile
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A very Happy Birthday to you! Hope it's a special day and a wonderful year ahead. I, too, wonder if Nolan "heard" you - have you had any follow-up conversations you wish to share? (Hope I'm not being too nosy!) I hope, too, that this isn't being a dick, but there are two typos in your post, both in the same paragraph: "As I filled out that form, instructing the hospital to pull the plug if I something happened that was going to leave me in a persistent vegitative state and give all of my organs to people who needed them, or the first time in my life, I had to really think very clearly and honestly about the possibility that I may go to sleep and never wake up, leaving Anne without a husband and our kids without a father." Two little things: "vegitative" is spelled "vegetative", and I think you meant to say "for the first time in my life", rather than "or the first time in my life". Hope this doesn't come across the wrong way - I'm cursed with seeing stuff like this (although even I never see it all; there are always plenty of typos in my writing as well). I so admire you and wish you well - enjoy your day!
Toggle Commented Jul 29, 2012 on Happy Don't Be A Dick Day! at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
I have always loved reading and honestly believe that there have been times that it has saved my life - the escapism I could find in books kept me from seeking permanent escapism from a miserable life. That being said, being a voracious reader was troublesome in school at times. Even from early days my reading speed and comprehension were very high - so I finished silent reading assignments during class much more quickly than my classmates. We used the SRS reading series and I managed to get through the entire year's cards in the first six-week period. I was reading at an 11th grade level in the 3rd grade. My most horrible memory of English class, however, came in my senior year of high school, taking English (British) Literature. Our teacher had us read every assignment out loud in class as the students would not have done the reading at home. Since most of the students were piss-poor readers, it fell on a very few of us to do the majority of the reading. I will never forget the sneers I received for reading a line from "Androcles and the Lion" properly - the line is, "Aw, did um's get a thorn in um's tootsum-wootsum?" - meant to be read in a baby voice, which I did. Deadly thing to do. Also, in that class the teacher dictated notes about the reading that we were required to transcribe into our study notebooks word for word, and the notebooks were collected and graded. So, yeah, obviously someone else's interpretation of the material ruled; there was little or no discussion about what we thought it meant. And that, I fear, is the great problem with education in the United States in general, not just literature or English - our school system does not teach analytical thinking, but "data in, data out". Little wonder that there are so many people who accept as gospel the things they hear on the news without thinking about them. Sad.
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I have to agree about Shakespeare. Although I understood and enjoyed reading the plays, my understanding and enjoyment increased immensely once I SAW them! In particular, "Much Ado About Nothing", with Emma Thompson and Kenneth Branagh, really amazed me as to ease of understanding.
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Jun 16, 2012