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Chelsea Lee
Washington, DC
I'm a manuscript editor at the American Psychological Association.
Interests: swing dancing, Balboa, crossword puzzles, grammar
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, in cases of copublication, put a semi-colon between the two publishers. So the reference in question would be cited as Tomlinson, J. A. (Ed.). (2002). Goya: Images of women. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art; New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Thanks for your question!
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Typepad HTML Email You should italicize the name of a newspaper, magazine, or journal no matter where they appear in a paper. So it will always be Economist, New York Times, and so forth, both in the text and reference list.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, you’re right, the name is a proper noun and so it capitalized.
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Typepad HTML Email Indeed this is a confusing case! The reference I would write is actually different than either of those you have presented. It focuses on the whole book, which is chiefly authored by Barth, edited/translated by Bromiley, and with an introduction by Gollwitzer. The key here is “with” an introduction --- Gollwitzer helped, but he didn’t write the whole thing, so the reference is adapted for that. Likewise, Bromiley edited and translated, but the ideas belong to Barth, not Bromiley. Here is what I would do: Barth, K. (with Gollwitzer, H.). (1994). Karl Barth: Church dogmatics. A selection with introduction (G. W. Bromiley, Ed. & Trans.). Edinburgh, Scotland: T&T Clark. In the text, the citation would be “(Barth, 1994).” If you’re quoting Gollwitzer’s introduction, use his name in the narrative to properly designate who is speaking, for example, “In his introduction to Barth (1994), Gollwitzer stated that….”
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Typepad HTML Email Hello and congratulations for being the first to ever ask this question! Review references in APA Style cite the author of the review, the year of the review’s publication, the title of the review, and the URL where the review can be retrieved. They also include information about the reviewed item (in this case, the name of the app and its author) in square brackets after the review title. The tricky issue I see here is getting a URL that will get the user to be able to see the review in question. As far as I can tell, reviews don’t have direct URLs, and you can’t see all the reviews unless you are in the app itself, so the URL to download the app is probably the best we are going to be able to do for now. Here is an example of a review for the app Epocrates. JabberFox. (2013). Essential tool for practitioners [Review of the app Epocrates, by Epocrates]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/epocrates/id281935788?mt=8 In the text, the citation would be to the author of the review and the date, so “(JabberFox, 2013).” Hope this helps. Good luck!
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Typepad HTML Email APA Style capitalizes all words of four letters or more, so you should capitalize “Based” in a title.
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Dear Style Experts, I am writing a paper in English for an English-speaking audience. However, I also speak French, and I read an article in French that I want to cite in my paper. I translated a quotation from the... Continue reading
Posted Nov 4, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email Yes, I’d keep the quotation marks the same as you did. Note that if you retrieved a copy of this article online (I am assuming you don’t have access to a 1922 copy of the magazine), rather than give the page range you give the URL where you found the article. So, Pringle, G. (1922, February 15). “God bless the ‘girls in green’!” MacLean’s. Retrieved from http://www.otlegacy.ca/articles/documents/macleansgirlsingreen.pdf
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Typepad HTML Email Right, that’s what I’m saying.
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Typepad HTML Email It sounds like for your case that you are right; it’s not very relevant. Good luck!
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APA and Psi Chi (the international honor society for psychology) have teamed up to produce free webinars for students on topics related to research and writing in psychology. The first webinar addressed how to find and use psychological tests and... Continue reading
Posted Oct 21, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email I think the most straightforward approach will be to write a reference for each volume that you used. I recommend this because each volume has different editors (usually Rieber in combination with someone else), publication years, and (as you mentioned) restarts pagination with page 1. The tricky part I think you’re missing is that when you cite an anthology, the editor of the work goes at the beginning of the reference, not the person who wrote the works in the anthology. So, for example, a citation for Volume 1 of the collected works you’re using would look like this: Rieber, R. W., & Carton, A. S. (1987). The Collected Works of L. S. Vygotsky: Vol. 1. Problems of general psychology (N. Minick, Trans.). New York, NY: Plenum Press. In text: (Rieber & Carton, 1987) As shown in the example of the Kurt Lewin reader above, you would work the name of the author (Vygotsky) and the original time of publication of the works within the anthology (1925) into the narrative if desired. The citation, however, is to the particular book that you used, and to retrieve that your readers will need to know the editors of the volume, the year the anthology volume was published, the title of the volume, who translated it, and its publication information. Good luck!
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, you can do that if you like. There’s no rule about what has to be in a heading.
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Typepad HTML Email The names of websites don’t need to be italicized or put in quotes when referring to them by name in the text---just write the names Facebook or YouTube. The names of newspapers should be italicized in text. As to whether the Huffington Post is a newspaper…it’s debatable. There’s no governing authority who decides what’s a newspaper versus a website versus an online magazine versus something else entirely. Best to look at how the site refers to itself and follow the convention associated with that. So if they call themselves a newspaper, italicize the name; otherwise, don’t.
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Typepad HTML Email Sounds great. Good luck with your thesis!
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Typepad HTML Email Part of this is a grammar question and part of this is a writing style question. From the grammar perspective, look up something like “grammar how to use myself” and you’ll find lots of resources on proper usage of the word myself. For example, in your first sentence you should have used the word “me,” as in, “…was executed by the graphic designer, the web designer, and me.” From the writing style perspective, it could be that some of your sentences are put together awkwardly---not wrong, but not as great as they could be. Be careful of too much passive voice (e.g., “was executed by me” vs. the active “I executed”). It might be helpful for you to consult a writing tutor at your university or to ask a friend to read through your thesis with you to point out any trouble spots.
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Typepad HTML Email Actually, your student doesn’t need to do a citation for the hashtag search, because the hashtag search is part of his methodology. All he needs to do is say something along the lines of “I searched Twitter for the hashtags #climatechange and #globalwarming as used over the period from September 1, 2014, to September 20, 2014.” This is a direct parallel to what authors do when they conduct meta-analyses and describe their research methodology---they say, “I searched PsycINFO for articles using the keywords climate change and global warming published between 2010 and 2013.” If the reader wants to see the search results, they can conduct the same search themselves (which is possible both on Twitter and on research databases like PsycINFO). Your student should provide citations, though, for any individual tweets he uses in particular (e.g., as representative or illustrative cases).
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, correct!
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, you should use quotation marks because what you’re quoting is dialogue. It doesn’t matter how long it is; if you’re quoting speech, it goes in quotation marks. How you wrote it looks great.
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Typepad HTML Email No, you do not combine a question mark and a colon in this context. Just use the question mark in the title so that you get “Can You Modify Behavior? It All Depends on Approach.”
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Typepad HTML Email When you begin a paper with a quotation, it’s called an epigraph. Usually APA publishes epigraphs at the beginning of the text; however, you may have different guidelines to follow given that you are writing a dissertation. Ask your advisor about how to handle epigraphs.
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Typepad HTML Email It’s fair to say that the Google corporation wrote the page about Google Now. Your initial attempt at a reference looks good.
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Each fall the APA Style Blog Team puts together a “best of” feature, and this year we continue the tradition with an updated set of posts from the APA Style Blog and our parent site, apastyle.org. We hope it will... Continue reading
Posted Sep 4, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email In both cases the reference list entry-related answer is about retrieval. If a reader wanted to find the article or the chapter, whose name would be written on the title page or in the byline? I can’t say for sure for your questions since you didn’t link to the actual examples, but I suspect that is the weekly editorial author for the first question and all three authors for the second. However, when you use these sources in the text, you can clarify which author is speaking, if that’s relevant to your discussion. For example, for your article with the minority report, you could say something like “Johnson stated in his minority report (Smith, Lake, & Johnson, 2013) that….”
Toggle Commented Sep 2, 2014 on The Generic Reference: Who? at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email You can leave the heading where it is.
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