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Chelsea Lee
Washington, DC
I'm a manuscript editor at the American Psychological Association.
Interests: swing dancing, Balboa, crossword puzzles, grammar
Recent Activity
Typepad HTML Email The goal is to find a way to direct the reader to the quotation. How would you tell the reader how to find this quotation? That’s what you should put in the quotation. Counting the pages manually might be a good option.
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Typepad HTML Email Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this matter. The question of what, exactly, constitutes a “greater whole” is what it comes down to, and it is nearly always a matter of interpretation. These pages looked like they were their own thing to me! I won’t claim to be perfect, though, and I understand the argument for the other decision now that you are pointing it out, which is why we have the comments section J. Ultimately, as long as the details of the reference are in there (author, date, title, source), your reader will be able to retrieve the source, and that is what is most important. In the meantime, please abide by the guidance you quoted from our E-Ref Guide.
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Dear Style Expert, I found a very useful website and cited a lot of information from it in my paper. But how do I write an in-text citation for content I found on a website? Do I just put the... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email In text you will cite the author of the blog post and the year of the blog post.
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Typepad HTML Email This looks great! You don’t need the square brackets around 2015 though---just Copyright 2015 by Dave Coverly will do. And kudos for the student for contacting the cartoonist!
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Typepad HTML Email If it’s fair use, you just leave off the permission statement. So you don’t have to write “Reproduced under fair use” at all --- you either state that you got permission or it is assumed that permission is not necessary because of fair use. Otherwise, looking great!
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Typepad HTML Email We only put the e-book type if it is something that you need specialized software to open. For example, at one time you could only open a Kindle book with the Kindle software; thus, Kindle book was in the notation to alert readers to this. However, many ebooks nowadays are in universally accessible file formats like HTML and PDF. So, unless you used a specialized device to open a specialized file, the notation is nowadays largely not necessary.
Toggle Commented Nov 21, 2016 on How Do I Cite a Kindle? at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email Thank you for sharing your thoughts with us. The circumstances under which gender diversity is relevant has become increasingly broad in recent years, and APA supports authors in using inclusive language like the singular “they.” For the cases you described, singular “they” is the most inclusive option, I agree.
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Typepad HTML Email Since you will be introducing an acronym, use this version that includes the acronym but without any quotation marks: The Asset Risk Management (ARM) Policy: Too Much Red Tape or Just Enough?
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Typepad HTML Email I would use the method that gets the reader the closest to the source. If the stable URL does that, use the stable URL.
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Typepad HTML Email I would replicate the two colons, strange as they are. Italicize the title of the book within the title and put it in sentence case too, just as you would if you were citing Where the Red Fern Grows in the reference list directly. Here you go: Kids' best friend: A story of two brothers and their awesome dogs: A spin-off dramatization of Where the red fern grows.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, you should italicize the title of the document, even if it appears in the heading. However, it may be better to come up with a different heading if you think this would be too confusing to your readers.
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Typepad HTML Email Sure, here is a page that’s part of a greater whole: College of William and Mary. (n.d.). Academic enrichment. Retrieved from http://www.wm.edu/offices/deanofstudents/services/academicenrichment/index.php Here is a page that stands alone: American Psychological Association. (2011). Recovering from wildfires. Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/wildfire.aspx Again, I understand that the distinction can seem nebulous… ultimately though the reference formats are nearly identical, the only difference being whether you italicize the title. If you are unsure, just pick what you think is best (personally, in the many years since writing this article, I think that italicizing makes more sense because it is what people expect to see).
Toggle Commented Nov 8, 2016 on The Generic Reference: Who? at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email No, you wouldn’t. Write about the ethics in cross-culture human occupational emergent situations (ECHOES) model.
Toggle Commented Nov 7, 2016 on Do I Capitalize This Word? at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email I think these sound fine.
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Typepad HTML Email If the page stands alone, like a report would, italicize it. Otherwise, do not italicize. I know it can be confusing sometimes, in which case you just have to make your best effort.
Toggle Commented Nov 7, 2016 on The Generic Reference: Who? at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email The school district is the same as a research participant in this case. She can’t include them in her reference list because any meaningful reference would identify the district. Instead, she should discuss the information obtained from the district in the text without citing it per se.
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Typepad HTML Email If you can, use the plus/minus symbol via the insert symbol meu. Or else type +/-. Correct that degrees of freedom are not italic. It’d be like this: F(1, 27) = …..
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Typepad HTML Email I think either Option 2 or Option 3 will work.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, I agree with your choices. Doesn’t look like there’s any need for remedial training after all ;)
Toggle Commented Oct 27, 2016 on Do I Capitalize This Word? at APA Style Blog
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by Chelsea Lee A hyphen is usually used in APA Style when two or more words modify a common noun (and that noun comes after the modifiers), for example, 7-point scale or client-centered counseling. When multiple modifiers have a common... Continue reading
Posted Oct 27, 2016 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email Well, technically you should use uppercase for when the word refers to a subscale directly and lowercase otherwise. However, if it is ambiguous which category should be used, I agree that a consistent approach would be advisable.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2016 on Do I Capitalize This Word? at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email Do not lowercase the acronym. Your capitalization is correct.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2016 on Do I Capitalize This Word? at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, capitalize the whole acronym.
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2016 on Do I Capitalize This Word? at APA Style Blog
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You can use the abbreviation for all the group authors after introducing it once. And when you cite multiple documents by this author at one time, you can combine the citations by listing the author once and then all relevant years. Example: (NT Government, 2015a, 2016).
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