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Chelsea Lee
Washington, DC
I'm a manuscript editor at the American Psychological Association.
Interests: swing dancing, Balboa, crossword puzzles, grammar
Recent Activity
Typepad HTML Email No, you do not combine a question mark and a colon in this context. Just use the question mark in the title so that you get “Can You Modify Behavior? It All Depends on Approach.”
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Typepad HTML Email When you begin a paper with a quotation, it’s called an epigraph. Usually APA publishes epigraphs at the beginning of the text; however, you may have different guidelines to follow given that you are writing a dissertation. Ask your advisor about how to handle epigraphs.
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Typepad HTML Email It’s fair to say that the Google corporation wrote the page about Google Now. Your initial attempt at a reference looks good.
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Each fall the APA Style Blog Team puts together a “best of” feature, and this year we continue the tradition with an updated set of posts from the APA Style Blog and our parent site, apastyle.org. We hope it will... Continue reading
Posted Sep 4, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email In both cases the reference list entry-related answer is about retrieval. If a reader wanted to find the article or the chapter, whose name would be written on the title page or in the byline? I can’t say for sure for your questions since you didn’t link to the actual examples, but I suspect that is the weekly editorial author for the first question and all three authors for the second. However, when you use these sources in the text, you can clarify which author is speaking, if that’s relevant to your discussion. For example, for your article with the minority report, you could say something like “Johnson stated in his minority report (Smith, Lake, & Johnson, 2013) that….”
Toggle Commented Sep 2, 2014 on The Generic Reference: Who? at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email You can leave the heading where it is.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, Mann-Whitney U is capitalized. The best way to determine capitalization for any specific variable would be to look it up in a statistics textbook or to see how other published authors have capitalized it and follow their usage.
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Typepad HTML Email That’s a bug!
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Typepad HTML Email No, you can continue using “et al.” in this case. The first citation spells out the author names and subsequent citations abbreviate, regardless of whether any of these citations are parenthetical or in the narrative.
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Typepad HTML Email The advice on when to italicize variables should be consistent across all three places (the Publication Manual, Concise Rules, and the blog). The bottom line is to use the symbol for a variable when it’s in conjunction with a mathematical operator, and italicize that symbol (e.g., M = 2.37).
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Typepad HTML Email The author should be the person who wrote or is responsible for the press release. If David Smith wrote it, then you’d put “Smith, D.” in the reference list. In this case, the Illinois Department of Health would be Smith’s affiliation, and it would not be part of the reference. If you needed to let the reader know the press release was from the Illinois Department of Health, that would be something you could incorporate into the text (e.g., “In a press release from the Illinois Department of Health (Smith, 2014), it was found that….”).
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, we recommend that you follow this guideline: If you are going to have any subsections in a section, have at least two. This is considered a good writing practice. Ultimately, whether it is okay for you to have only one section would depend on what your professor or editor thinks.
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Typepad HTML Email Unfortunately we don’t have anything to do with automatic citations generated by third-party software. But you’re right about what the correct citation should look like (plus you don’t even need the retrieval date for the citation). The correct format would be this: Hume-Pratuch, J. (2014, July 25). How to Use the New DOI Format in APA Style [Blog post]. Retrieved from http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/07/how-to-use-the-new-doi-format-in-apa-style.html
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Typepad HTML Email Your reference looks great. Even though the author used a nonstandard wording, it is still meant to be a proper noun and so you should capitalize it in the reference. However, in your own work please feel free to use the standard title of the mathematics policy.
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Typepad HTML Email In this case I would treat the reference as having no author and move the title to the author position. Your online reference work entry example looks great! The example provided by Drugs.com indeed makes no sense with any edition of APA Style that has ever existed.
Toggle Commented Jul 29, 2014 on The Generic Reference: Who? at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email For your question about the law reference: APA follows the citation formats of the Legal Bluebook (www.legalbluebook.com) for legal references. Your library will probably have a copy of this, or many law school websites will help you with legal citations. I did a search on “European Union directive citation Legal Bluebook” and you can find lots of examples that way that explain in great detail what to do (example: http://lawguides.creighton.edu/content.php?pid=135369&sid=1163728). I am not a legal scholar so I am not 100% on this, but I think the citation should be “Directive 2011/65/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 8 June 2011 on the restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment, 2011 O. J. (L 174) 88.” in the reference list. In the text, the citation is the name of the law and the year, so “(Directive 2011/65/EU, 2011).” For the personal communication citations: You may want to give both employees numbers (Employee 1 and Employee 2, rather than Employee and Employee 2) to make them easier for the reader to tell apart. Otherwise, the citation follows the format for a personal communication properly.
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Typepad HTML Email It’s that way because the title of the item for the reference comes from its caption, and there is no caption for the infographic. Thus you describe the item instead, inside square brackets.
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Typepad HTML Email You are very close with your reference. Ferrazi, K., & Raz, T. (2014). Never eat alone: And other secrets to success, one relationship at a time [Kindle book]. Retrieved from http://www.amazon.com In text the citation includes the authors and the date of publication, so that’s “(Ferrazi & Raz, 2014)” or “Ferrazi and Raz (2014)”.
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Typepad HTML Email If he gives permission for you to quote his words, you can quote his words. The issue is whether you can include his name and organization alongside his words. For that you should defer to his wishes. It is possible to quote his words without including any details about his name or the name of his organization.
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Typepad HTML Email If the man you interviewed does not want his name or organizational details included in your paper, then you must respect his wishes. If he is okay with you including his words, then you could include what he said in quotation marks and describe him in an anonymous way. For example, you could describe him as a man who works for a security organization who preferred not to be identified. For the focus groups (which are groups of research participants), you can quote the findings using any of the examples in the section of this post called “Examples of How to Discuss Research Participant Data.” If you read the post it tells you exactly what to do.
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Typepad HTML Email In a case like reading a textbook, you should track down the cited article, read it for yourself, and then cite the original article. The idea is that you cannot possibly know the full context of what those authors said based on what was said in the textbook. It’s your job to make sure the article says what you think it does and to cite that.
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Typepad HTML Email My understanding is that the Kindle does not have page numbers because the user can adjust the size of the text. So if the text is big, fewer words fit on a “page”; if the text is small, more words fit on a page. The location number is static (doesn’t change when the text size changes) but no one without a Kindle will ever understand it. Newer Kindle books often include the same page numbers as printed books, however. It just depends on the book.
Toggle Commented Jun 17, 2014 on How Do I Cite a Kindle? at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email No, this doesn’t work. The sentence should still be grammatically correct without the parenthetical information. If we take yours out, you get “According to, the studies have produced mixed results,” which doesn’t make sense anymore. Instead, you need to put the authors’ names in the narrative: “According to Albright (2004), Gibson (2011), and Smith (2010), the studies have produced mixed results.” Or, you need to add more words to the narrative so that the sentence makes sense, something like “According to several authors (Albright, 2004…..”
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Typepad HTML Email Cite it like a Facebook status update, but with the URL of the actual post you are citing. And instead of calling it a “Facebook status update” inside the square brackets, put a more appropriate description (your choice). You can get that URL by clicking on the date stamp of the post as per usual.
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Typepad HTML Email You need to identify the authors (Ferrazzi & Raz), the year (2014), the name of the book (“Never eat alone…”) and then the publishing information, which you know is a Kindle book you downloaded from Amazon. Just plug that information into the template shown in this blog post. The page number information goes in the in-text citation.
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