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Chelsea Lee
Washington, DC
I'm a manuscript editor at the American Psychological Association.
Interests: swing dancing, Balboa, crossword puzzles, grammar
Recent Activity
Typepad HTML Email You treat the number as though it is spelled out. So “1 in 3 Campaign” would be alphabetized under “O” for “One.” Hope that helps!
Toggle Commented Apr 9, 2015 on Alphabetization in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email No space! Thanks for the easy question!
Toggle Commented Apr 9, 2015 on A DOI Primer at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email Actually, use a comma rather than back to back parentheses: American Psychological Association (APA, 2010) recommends…
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Typepad HTML Email Actually, that person’s name would be listed twice, once as the author of the chapter and again as the editor of the anthology after “In”. You do list pages after volume information as you showed.
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Typepad HTML Email These chapters are considered “in press.” So you provide as much of the reference as you can, but use “in press” rather than the date of publication (since that date hasn’t come yet). For example: Smith, J. (in press). Title of chapter. In A. Editor (Ed.), Title of edited book. Publisher location: Publisher name. The references wouldn’t include page numbers since those haven’t been assigned yet.
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Typepad HTML Email Every citation has to uniquely refer to one reference list entry. So it’s Smith, Brady, et al. everywhere, even though Smith, Connor, et al. doesn’t occur until near the end of the paper. The plus of this approach is that you don’t have to remember where you last cited either Smith reference. Although note if the references have exactly three authors, you’ll actually have to write out all three names every time (see the section on the quirks of et al.). Good luck!
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, sentence case for article titles (including blog post titles) is correct!
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Typepad HTML Email You are following the correct procedure. While I see your colleague’s point, you can perhaps imagine the nightmare it would create in practice. As you are writing the paper you would constantly have to monitor whether you had added a citation to the other paper by Martin and update the references accordingly. It would be a lot of work and it would introduce considerable potential for error, as you would have to keep track of which you had switched and which you hadn’t. The method of assigning letters according to which title comes first alphabetically is simple and does not require any updates during the writing process, although it does require one to tolerate a “b” reference potentially coming before an “a” reference. Hope that helps!
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Typepad HTML Email Technically you are correct, because the manual says to put references in the same order as they appear in the reference list even when they shorten to et al. But in practice, people follow the convention of the proofreader and write “(Adams et al., 2013, 2014)” because the other way looks wrong even if it isn’t. I look at the practice of using chronological order with combined “et al.” citations to be an adaptation developed in the community that works, sort of like when people ignore sidewalks and make their own path through the grass. So you can decide which path is better for you to take. Good luck!
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Typepad HTML Email It does not matter whether words are in quotation marks for the purposes of capitalization. So the title of the paper would be written as follows: “I Didn’t Know Who Is Canadian”: The Shift in Student Expectations During the Initial Stages of a Study Abroad Program. Hope that helps!
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Typepad HTML Email The publication name is included for magazines, newspapers, and journals. However, blog posts don’t include the name of the blog in the reference list entry. So the thing to do is to determine what kind of source you’re looking at. Business Insider is an online newspaper, and Autoblog is (you guessed it) a blog. So yes to including the former, and no to including the latter in the reference.
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Typepad HTML Email The two references would be cited as (Harris, Bargh, & Brownell, 2009) and (Harris, Pomeranz, et al., 2009). You can’t shorten the reference with only three authors without it becoming confusing, so you just write out all three names each time in this case. Thanks for including the examples, too, as it made answering your question much easier! Hope this helps.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, you could use the same citation to refer to more than one image. My point is to clarify that you should not use the brackets before the parentheses because they are not necessary. You can simply put the information you had inside the brackets in the parentheses as well. Hope that helps!
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Typepad HTML Email You could actually put the comment inside the parentheses. Just write “(all images from Source, 2015)”.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, if the chapter has a DOI, you should include it at the end of the reference. The date of the chapters will be the same as the date of the whole book. Hope that helps!
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Typepad HTML Email You need to put quotes around the person’s fake name only the first time --- thereafter, just write it out normally. Whether you give the person a last name is entirely up to you. And finally, the research participants do not go in the references section, because their quotes are part of your study data, and you don’t cite your own data you gathered for that study. Hope that helps!
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Typepad HTML Email The PM does in fact allow you to use a paragraph number in a citation even if the paragraph number is not visible: “If the document includes headings and neither paragraph nor page numbers are visible, cite the heading and the number of the paragraph following it to direct the reader to the location of the quoted material” (p. 172). However, the PM doesn’t directly state what to do if a document has neither headings nor visible paragraph numbers or page numbers; in this case you should count the paragraphs from the beginning of the document. This would apply to a text of any length; however, it is likely that longer documents have headings or sections, allowing you to follow the advice quoted above and just count paragraphs from that heading, not from the beginning of the document. As to your final point, you are of course correct that many users will use the search function rather than the paragraph or page number to find the location of the direct quotation in online material; perhaps we will see an evolution of this practice in the future. Thank you for your comment!
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by Chelsea Lee All APA Style in-text citations have two parts: the author and the date. Some in-text citations also include page numbers (or other location information when page numbers are not available, as with some online materials). This post... Continue reading
Posted Mar 3, 2015 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email Yes, you’re pretty close, except I don’t think there is really an author for the compiled reviews. So I would treat it as a reference with no author and no date, which means the title goes at the beginning of the reference. A retrieval date would also be good to include since this page will constantly be changing. That gives: Evernote [Compilation of reviews for the app Evernote]. (n.d.). Retrieved March 2. 2015, from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/evernote/id281796108. Then in text you use the citation (“Evernote,” n.d.). Hope that helps!
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, in cases of copublication, put a semi-colon between the two publishers. So the reference in question would be cited as Tomlinson, J. A. (Ed.). (2002). Goya: Images of women. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art; New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Thanks for your question!
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Typepad HTML Email You should italicize the name of a newspaper, magazine, or journal no matter where they appear in a paper. So it will always be Economist, New York Times, and so forth, both in the text and reference list.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, you’re right, the name is a proper noun and so it capitalized.
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Typepad HTML Email Indeed this is a confusing case! The reference I would write is actually different than either of those you have presented. It focuses on the whole book, which is chiefly authored by Barth, edited/translated by Bromiley, and with an introduction by Gollwitzer. The key here is “with” an introduction --- Gollwitzer helped, but he didn’t write the whole thing, so the reference is adapted for that. Likewise, Bromiley edited and translated, but the ideas belong to Barth, not Bromiley. Here is what I would do: Barth, K. (with Gollwitzer, H.). (1994). Karl Barth: Church dogmatics. A selection with introduction (G. W. Bromiley, Ed. & Trans.). Edinburgh, Scotland: T&T Clark. In the text, the citation would be “(Barth, 1994).” If you’re quoting Gollwitzer’s introduction, use his name in the narrative to properly designate who is speaking, for example, “In his introduction to Barth (1994), Gollwitzer stated that….”
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Typepad HTML Email Hello and congratulations for being the first to ever ask this question! Review references in APA Style cite the author of the review, the year of the review’s publication, the title of the review, and the URL where the review can be retrieved. They also include information about the reviewed item (in this case, the name of the app and its author) in square brackets after the review title. The tricky issue I see here is getting a URL that will get the user to be able to see the review in question. As far as I can tell, reviews don’t have direct URLs, and you can’t see all the reviews unless you are in the app itself, so the URL to download the app is probably the best we are going to be able to do for now. Here is an example of a review for the app Epocrates. JabberFox. (2013). Essential tool for practitioners [Review of the app Epocrates, by Epocrates]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/epocrates/id281935788?mt=8 In the text, the citation would be to the author of the review and the date, so “(JabberFox, 2013).” Hope this helps. Good luck!
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Typepad HTML Email APA Style capitalizes all words of four letters or more, so you should capitalize “Based” in a title.
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