This is Chelsea Lee's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Chelsea Lee's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Chelsea Lee
Washington, DC
I'm a manuscript editor at the American Psychological Association.
Interests: swing dancing, Balboa, crossword puzzles, grammar
Recent Activity
Typepad HTML Email For your question about the law reference: APA follows the citation formats of the Legal Bluebook (www.legalbluebook.com) for legal references. Your library will probably have a copy of this, or many law school websites will help you with legal citations. I did a search on “European Union directive citation Legal Bluebook” and you can find lots of examples that way that explain in great detail what to do (example: http://lawguides.creighton.edu/content.php?pid=135369&sid=1163728). I am not a legal scholar so I am not 100% on this, but I think the citation should be “Directive 2011/65/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 8 June 2011 on the restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment, 2011 O. J. (L 174) 88.” in the reference list. In the text, the citation is the name of the law and the year, so “(Directive 2011/65/EU, 2011).” For the personal communication citations: You may want to give both employees numbers (Employee 1 and Employee 2, rather than Employee and Employee 2) to make them easier for the reader to tell apart. Otherwise, the citation follows the format for a personal communication properly.
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email It’s that way because the title of the item for the reference comes from its caption, and there is no caption for the infographic. Thus you describe the item instead, inside square brackets.
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email You are very close with your reference. Ferrazi, K., & Raz, T. (2014). Never eat alone: And other secrets to success, one relationship at a time [Kindle book]. Retrieved from http://www.amazon.com In text the citation includes the authors and the date of publication, so that’s “(Ferrazi & Raz, 2014)” or “Ferrazi and Raz (2014)”.
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email If he gives permission for you to quote his words, you can quote his words. The issue is whether you can include his name and organization alongside his words. For that you should defer to his wishes. It is possible to quote his words without including any details about his name or the name of his organization.
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email If the man you interviewed does not want his name or organizational details included in your paper, then you must respect his wishes. If he is okay with you including his words, then you could include what he said in quotation marks and describe him in an anonymous way. For example, you could describe him as a man who works for a security organization who preferred not to be identified. For the focus groups (which are groups of research participants), you can quote the findings using any of the examples in the section of this post called “Examples of How to Discuss Research Participant Data.” If you read the post it tells you exactly what to do.
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email In a case like reading a textbook, you should track down the cited article, read it for yourself, and then cite the original article. The idea is that you cannot possibly know the full context of what those authors said based on what was said in the textbook. It’s your job to make sure the article says what you think it does and to cite that.
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email My understanding is that the Kindle does not have page numbers because the user can adjust the size of the text. So if the text is big, fewer words fit on a “page”; if the text is small, more words fit on a page. The location number is static (doesn’t change when the text size changes) but no one without a Kindle will ever understand it. Newer Kindle books often include the same page numbers as printed books, however. It just depends on the book.
Toggle Commented Jun 17, 2014 on How Do I Cite a Kindle? at APA Style Blog
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email No, this doesn’t work. The sentence should still be grammatically correct without the parenthetical information. If we take yours out, you get “According to, the studies have produced mixed results,” which doesn’t make sense anymore. Instead, you need to put the authors’ names in the narrative: “According to Albright (2004), Gibson (2011), and Smith (2010), the studies have produced mixed results.” Or, you need to add more words to the narrative so that the sentence makes sense, something like “According to several authors (Albright, 2004…..”
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email Cite it like a Facebook status update, but with the URL of the actual post you are citing. And instead of calling it a “Facebook status update” inside the square brackets, put a more appropriate description (your choice). You can get that URL by clicking on the date stamp of the post as per usual.
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email You need to identify the authors (Ferrazzi & Raz), the year (2014), the name of the book (“Never eat alone…”) and then the publishing information, which you know is a Kindle book you downloaded from Amazon. Just plug that information into the template shown in this blog post. The page number information goes in the in-text citation.
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email What an interestingly sticky situation. Actually, though, this isn’t your fight---you should cite the book with the names of the authors presented however they are on the book itself. The purpose of the reference is to help the reader retrieve the source, not to tell the story of its disputed authorship. So just treat it like a work with two authors. Good luck!
Toggle Commented May 30, 2014 on The Generic Reference: Who? at APA Style Blog
1 reply
Image
by Chelsea Lee In some psychology classes, students take an inventory or measure (such as a personality inventory) and then are asked to report their results and write about their reactions in a paper. This post addresses how to report... Continue reading
Posted May 29, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email You do not include any degrees in citations. So just leave the PhD off entirely.
1 reply
Image
by Chelsea Lee Any sleep-deprived student knows those papers don’t write themselves. A living, breathing, person must produce the words on the page, and in certain contexts, you have to acknowledge that fact in the text itself. Let’s go through... Continue reading
Posted May 22, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email No you are not supposed to begin with a heading, unless there is some extenuating circumstance. The abstract is not an introduction.
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email When including a direct quotation, the safest route is to always include the author, year, and page number. Thus your first example would be preferred: Erikson (1968) stated, “To review the concept of identity means to sketch its history” (p. 15). However, as you noted this does create some repetition as far as the citation is concerned----while it’s not incorrect, consider recasting the sentence to put that citation (or the previous citation) in parentheses entirely, which may make for a text that reads more smoothly. For example: I will explore the idea that “to review the concept of identity means to sketch its history” (Erikson, 1968, p. 15).
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email If all the chapters are by the same author (which it sounds like is the case), then you cite the entire book in the reference list. In the text, include the number of the chapter alongside the author-date reference. Examples and a longer description of what to do can be found here: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/11/how-to-cite-part-of-a-work.html
1 reply
APA Style double spaces the whole reference page. But if your professor asks for something different, follow what your professor says to do.
1 reply
Yes, (n.d.-a) and (n.d.-b) are the formats to use. Just put a hyphen in there and you're set.
1 reply
I looked into the example and Lippincott Williams & Wilkins is the publisher. They're owned by Wolters Kluwer Health, a large corporation that appears to own a lot of other entities, but this detail is more than you need for a reference list entry. The name of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins is sufficient.
1 reply
The first citation uses all three names and all subsequent citations use the first name plus et al. Whether first or subsequent citations are parenthetical or in the narrative does not matter.
1 reply
From looking at the source (thanks for the links) this looks like a regular edited book to me. Since you retrieved it online, you only need to provide the URL, not the publisher information too. Danesh, H. B. (Ed.). (2011). Education for Peace Integrative Curriculum Series: Vol. 4. Education for peace reader. Retrieved from http://efpinternational.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/efp_reader.pdf So actually this one is pretty simple. Good luck!
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email It doesn’t affect the ordering in the reference list. If the author and year are the same, order the references alphabetically by title, e.g., Author, A. (2003a, February). Aardvarks… and Author, A. (2003b). Building bridges…. Hope that helps.
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email The reference should reflect the qualities of the source you used, because the purpose of the reference is to help the reader retrieve the source. So if the book was published for the first time in 1950, the year in the reference should be 1950.
1 reply
Typepad HTML Email Yes, that’s right. The period would go inside the quotation marks in the example Marcus gave.
1 reply