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Chelsea Lee
Washington, DC
I'm a manuscript editor at the American Psychological Association.
Interests: swing dancing, Balboa, crossword puzzles, grammar
Recent Activity
Typepad HTML Email You didn’t include your example, so I can’t comment on that, but if the running head is overflowing, have you checked it for length? It should be max 50 characters including spaces.
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Typepad HTML Email Again, the report is not a recoverable source so you cannot cite it per se. You just cite the test that you took and describe in your narrative that your quotation comes from the report of your results.
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Typepad HTML Email The results of the self-assessment are not a recoverable source, so you can’t cite them. However, you can cite the test that you took (provide author, date, title, and source in the reference list and author and date in the text)—this is what I advise you to do.
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Typepad HTML Email It’s not in the manual but is part of general writing advice. Use “such as” to introduce examples. Use “like” for comparisons of things that are similar. So in your example, I would use “such as resource constrains and political pressures.”
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Typepad HTML Email You are right to put the edition next to the page numbers, but they go in the same set of parentheses: (7th ed., pp. 25-47). Also put the title of the chapter and the book in sentence case (Leadership theory and application for nurse leaders), and you do not need the retrieval date—instead give the publisher information. Then you’re good to go!
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Typepad HTML Email The primary source is the source in which the information was first reported or published. A secondary source reports information secondhand. When you write “The State of Obesity 2018 report (as cited in Molina, 2018),” you are citing the Obesity report as a secondary source; you didn’t read the Obesity report, you read Molina. Your formatting if you read Molina is correct. Does that help?
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Typepad HTML Email In this case, the Obesity Report is a secondary source, because the data as reported in Molina were already published somewhere (in the report). So use the “as cited in” version of the citation.
Toggle Commented Sep 17, 2018 on The Myth of the Off-Limits Source at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email The newspaper article is a primary source because the quotation is being published in that article for the first time. However, because the speaker in the quotation is not the same as the author of the article, you have to work the name of the speaker into the sentence and then insert the citation---your second example is correct.
Toggle Commented Sep 17, 2018 on The Myth of the Off-Limits Source at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email The ampersand is not included because the ellipsis makes it redundant. Including both an ellipsis and an ampersand is not necessary; hence, only the ellipsis is used.
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Typepad HTML Email Have my many blessings! The clarity of the writing is the most important thing. If you’re going cross-eyed, that’s not good for clarity. I advise that you use “U.S.” as the form.
Toggle Commented Sep 10, 2018 on An Abbreviations FAQ at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email The citation I sent comes from the authors of the test and can be found on their website. It needed some formatting for proper APA Style, but otherwise, we advise that you use a suggested citation wherever possible. That’s why my citation looked the way it did---although I appreciate your thoughtfulness.
Toggle Commented Sep 10, 2018 on How to Cite Part of a Work at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email I believe that Merriam-Webster’s has changed how they refer to their own dictionary over the years. You should cite the title as shown on the work, which for this dictionary is the Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary. You can see the official name in their FAQ (see the question “Which dictionary is used”): https://www.merriam-webster.com/about-us/faq
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Typepad HTML Email You should cite the author, date, title, and source of the test itself. Browne, C., Culligan, B., & Phillips, J. (2013). The New General Service List. Retrieved from http://www.newgeneralservicelist.org In text: (Browne, Culligan, & Phillips, 2013) Hope that helps!
Toggle Commented Sep 6, 2018 on How to Cite Part of a Work at APA Style Blog
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by Chelsea Lee Dear Style Expert, How do I format quotations from books or articles written in a foreign language? Do I have to present the quotation in both the original language and in translation, or do I present only... Continue reading
Posted Sep 3, 2018 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email APA does not have specific rules for this, other than to use numerals (which you did). I recommend using the same formats you see in the literature you are citing, so that you are consistent. The formats you included in your example sentence are fine.
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Typepad HTML Email I’d be happy to help, but I’m having a hard time imagining you paper. Can you email your question and an example to StyleExpert at apa.org?
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, that’s correct. You don’t nee to start a new page until the references section.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, that would be fine!
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Typepad HTML Email Images are treated as figures in APA Style, and images reproduced from other sources need more thorough credit than a quotation does. See this blog post series for details: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2016/01/navigating-copyright-overview.html All that to say, you would put the image and then the credit beneath it. But APA Style isn’t really set up to use an image as an epigraph so it won’t be as neat a solution as if you used a quotation.
Toggle Commented Aug 7, 2018 on How to Format an Epigraph at APA Style Blog
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by Chelsea Lee Feeling spacey on how to line space your APA Style paper? Follow this handy guide to never have line spacing questions again. Line Spacing Recommendations for APA Style Element Spacing Note Title page Double Abstract Double Text... Continue reading
Posted Aug 6, 2018 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email If you’re publishing with an APA journal, present a quoted tweet in the same way as you would present a quotation from any kind of work---the format depends on length (less than 40 words in quotation marks in a sentence, more than 40 words in a block quotation). Some papers adopt a special style when the paper has lots of quotations, which is likely what you’re seeing when people always use block quotes or change font size, but that style is not APA Style specifically. The person has most likely made their own style for that paper, and you can do this too if you are publishing your paper online or on your own. As for the reference list, yes, do include the tweet in the reference list even if you have quoted it in the paper.
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Typepad HTML Email If the full URL will work, provide it! Basically, if you can use the URL in your web browser, that’s the easiest thing for everyone. But if that URL won’t work because it’s behind a subscription login, give the homepage URL because that’s what will work.
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by Chelsea Lee Dear Style Expert, How do I format quotations from research participants who I interviewed as part of my work when those quotations are in a foreign language? Do I have to present the quotation in both the... Continue reading
Posted Jul 16, 2018 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email If there were only one book, no comma…. With multiple books, it could be either way (there is no set guideline). I think the comma helps clarify that the edition belongs to all the versions and not just one.
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Typepad HTML Email There’s no guideline on what order to use—feel free to use whatever order you think makes the most sense. And yes, a comma before the version is correct.
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