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Chelsea Lee
Washington, DC
I'm a manuscript editor at the American Psychological Association.
Interests: swing dancing, Balboa, crossword puzzles, grammar
Recent Activity
Typepad HTML Email You would put the study number after a comma: (McCleary et al., 2011, Study 1). Good luck!
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by Chelsea Lee APA Style references have four parts: author, date, title, and source, and these parts are separated by periods. This example of a book reference shows the pattern (the periods are highlighted to help you see them): Author,... Continue reading
Posted Aug 15, 2016 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email Once you introduce an abbreviation, you can use it at the beginning of a sentence if you want! Good luck!
Toggle Commented Aug 8, 2016 on An Abbreviations FAQ at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, you would use reverse italics on the title within a title: Christians and the color line: Race and religion after Divided by faith.
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Typepad HTML Email My advice is that you should use it whenever you mean it, but to keep in mind that no reader expects one study to be an exhaustive list of the literature. So if you are making a particular point and you cite a source or two, you probably wouldn’t need to use “e.g.” because the reader will already understand that those two sources are meant to support your statement, not that those two sources are the only two sources in the whole literature that support your statement. However, if you’re making a broader claim, or if you’re providing background information, “e.g.” is more helpful to the reader. Good luck!
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Typepad HTML Email I would use the page the footnote is actually on.
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2016 on How to Cite Part of a Work at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email A very strict interpretation of the rules would indeed produce a citation of (Barnett et al., 1992, 1987). However, in practice our authors tend to use chronological order for cases like these, and you are permitted to do the same. J
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Typepad HTML Email You’d use two hyphens: health-care-associated infection. J
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by Anne Breitenbach APA Style is older than virtually all of its users—if you were born after 1929, then APA Style is older than you are. But just because APA Style is nearing its 10th decade doesn’t mean that its... Continue reading
Posted Jul 14, 2016 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email I think either slashes or commas would work here! Perhaps “Sonata, Sonatina, and Baroque Festival.”
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Typepad HTML Email Hi D, This blog is a relatively informal place, so contractions are appropriate. There is no such rule as “no contractions” or “all contractions.” For your last question, the phrasing would be “contract either everything or nothing.”
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Typepad HTML Email Italicize the title of a press release. We reconsidered whether the title should be italic after talking it through with readers, and the old comments you see are evidence of that. We settled on italic. Thanks for asking!
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You should use double quotation marks. Thanks for the question!
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Typepad HTML Email Good question, but no, they wouldn’t be, because the articles are not packaged as separate issues.
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Typepad HTML Email It should go under T for “twenty-three.”
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, spell it out and alphabetize it under “World.”
Toggle Commented Jul 5, 2016 on Alphabetization in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email The title of the book within the journal article title should be in sentence case, italics.
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Typepad HTML Email APA doesn’t specify what to do with a list of acronyms. Since it sounds like a table, I would treat it as a table and put it in the list of tables, and otherwise format it as you would any other table.
Toggle Commented Jun 28, 2016 on An Abbreviations FAQ at APA Style Blog
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If the author thinks it necessary to define the acronyms in a table, then it makes sense to include them all, or to provide a rationale for which ones have been included.
Toggle Commented Jun 21, 2016 on An Abbreviations FAQ at APA Style Blog
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If you only use one book as a source for your paper, you will have only one reference list entry. For the in text citations, you can also include the page number along with the author and date to provide more specificity for the citation for the reader.
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Typepad HTML Email You can leave it the same as it was published—no need to add italics.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, looks great!
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, put citations midsentence if the information pertaining to those citations is also midsentence. Only put all citations at the end if all citations apply to the whole sentence.
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Typepad HTML Email No, you leave it off. The kind of punctuation you would leave would be a question mark or exclamation point, something that changes the tone of the sentence.
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Typepad HTML Email Usually in APA Style you don’t see a page number without an author and date, but this may have more to do with the usual writing practice of APA authors vs. students than this practice being prohibited. Here’s what I would do: For direct quotations, always include the author, date, and page number. For paraphrases, if this is the first time you have cited to a work in a paragraph, include the author and date, and the page number is optional. Within a paragraph, if you have multiple narrative citations, you can omit the author and the date upon subsequent narrative citations and include just the page number so long as the reference is clear. So in the example you provided, it’s all fine except for the end part that’s two pages later---that citation would have to be (Smith, 2010, p. 37).
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