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Chelsea Lee
Washington, DC
I'm a manuscript editor at the American Psychological Association.
Interests: swing dancing, Balboa, crossword puzzles, grammar
Recent Activity
Typepad HTML Email APA Style certainly doesn’t endorse this construction; other guides with which I am familiar (Chicago, MLA) don’t endorse this approach either. Hope that helps!
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, this is the official APA Style Blog! Any advice you receive on here comes officially from APA.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, the pseudonym needs to appear in the sentence only once; otherwise, it’s redundant. As long as the pseudonym is in the narrative or in parentheses, you will have attributed the quotation to the participant. You don’t need to do both.
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Typepad HTML Email According to APA alphabetization rules, the letters with accent marks are treated as though the accent marks are not there. So, you would put a name starting with Ö alongside a name starting with O. I think that because you are writing in English, it stands to reason that you should follow English alphabetization principles. Hope that helps!
Toggle Commented Sep 20, 2017 on Alphabetization in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email You should include the code section as you did in your first example --- also capitalize the words preceding the section number (e.g., Code 3.05). Because the parts of the ethics code are systematically numbered, you can use this as the location information in the citation.
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Typepad HTML Email You can quote the book flap in your paper. The reference list entry should be to the book itself, and in the text, instead of a page number, state the location information for the quotation. For example, (Smith, 2017, front cover book flap).
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Typepad HTML Email I would not use the block quote format; regardless of length, the passage is still paraphrased.
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Typepad HTML Email Well, some of the journals may have style guidelines that do ask for a period after the DOI---so by their rules the formatting may not be incorrect. It all depends on whether the journals are using APA Style. For those articles that are inconsistent, this is a case of poor copyediting, which could exist for many reasons.
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Typepad HTML Email The guidelines described in this blog post work the same for longer quotations (that would appear in block quote form) as they do for shorter quotations. So you should attribute the quote to the participant’s pseudonym, but there is no citation per se.
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Typepad HTML Email The adaptation you came up with in your linked Facebook post looks great. The purpose of the reference should be for the reader to be able to identify and retrieve the material being cited, and you have accomplished that.
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Each fall we put together a “best of” post to highlight blog posts and apastyle.org pages that we think are helpful both for new students and to those who are familiar with APA Style. You can get the full story... Continue reading
Posted Sep 6, 2017 at APA Style Blog
Typepad HTML Email The APA guideline would be to indent the epigraph from the left margin like a block quotation--- not centered.
Toggle Commented Aug 28, 2017 on How to Format an Epigraph at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email I think that Ministerio de Salud de Chile as the author makes good sense. That’s what I’d use.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, repeat the headings at the top of each subsequent page of the table. At the bottom of the first page of the table, write (table continues). Then on the top of each subsequent page of the table, write Table 1 (continued). (Of course use the number of the table for your paper.)
Toggle Commented Aug 9, 2017 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email If the symbol has a spelled-out version (example: mean and M), then the spelled-out version is usually used outside of parentheses.
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Typepad HTML Email Your question would probably make more sense to a statistician, which I alas am not! I suggest you consult your statistics professor for more clarity on this matter.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, screenshots are images and images are figures, so screenshots would be treated as figures. You should credit them in the figure caption using the author-date citation, such as (Rice, 2007).
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Typepad HTML Email The actual image portion of the figure should use sans serif font. The figure caption should be in serif font (Times New Roman). All of tables should be in Times New Roman font as well. Sorry for the confusion you experienced!
Toggle Commented Jul 31, 2017 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email No, you should put the book in your reference list only once, and the citation will refer to the whole book. In the text, just include the relevant page number along with the author and year of the citation.
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Typepad HTML Email I noticed that too; however, that name doesn’t appear on any of the actual articles as far as I can tell. Because a key focus of citation is citing what you see, we recommended to cite the source using the information on the article itself.
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Typepad HTML Email Yes, that’s just how it works!
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Typepad HTML Email I would italicize the period, because it comes between two italic elements.
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Typepad HTML Email For the abstract, the word count refers to just the words in the paragraph of the abstract itself. Good question! And yes, “guideline” is used intentionally to convey that different practices may exist depending on the publisher, assignment, etc. J
Toggle Commented Jul 17, 2017 on You Can Word Count on This at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email The suffix is included in the reference list entry but not the in-text citation: Reference list: Holton, J., IV In text: (Holton, 2015)
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Typepad HTML Email You could also cite the OSHA standard via the C.F.R. route. The reader might not necessarily realize the OSHA standards are in the C.F.R. (I didn’t at first). Since you’re working in a field where citing standards is very common, using the C.F.R. version of the citation sounds like a great solution.
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