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Chgowiz
Interests: Old school D&D, scifi, kids, stock car racing, fishing, computers, Life
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Wil: I just lost my Father this month and I was with him through the last days. It does make a difference after awhile, because you will, I think, realize your love helped Ferris to take the next step in his journey. I know that knowledge helps me. It hurts. Grieve, remember, laugh and be well. Our whole family, and our dog Bear, are sorry for your loss.
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That's one setting that I know a lot of people loved in 2E - and surprisingly, there isn't a retroclone of 2E that I know of. There is a lot of talk about it. My guess is that as we wind our way through 4E and more people want to go back to what they grew up with, you'll see a retroclone of 2E become available.
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Wil, there are many free RPGs that are available right now that boast of professional quality and, best part IMNSHO, they hew close to that D&D that you and I grew up with: Swords & Wizardry (Original D&D clone) http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/ OSRIC (AD&D - virtually identical) http://www.knights-n-knaves.com/osric/ Labyrinth Lord (Basic/Expert) http://www.goblinoidgames.com/labyrinthlord.htm There are a ton more but these are good ones to get started. I'd also recommend the magazines Fight On! and Knockspell for old school style magazines - like Dungeon mag and Dragon mag used to be back in the day. http://www.fightonmagazine.com/ http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=10 Disclaimer - I'm a self-proclaimed Grognard who never left OD&D/AD&D in his heart and when 3E made me cry, these clones helped me to rediscover the love.
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@wilw - awesome! It's always nice to come away from the screen with that flushed "Yes!!!!" feeling that you just did some awesome gaming. @Craig - "you want to do that? Ok, ROLL FOR IT!". QFT. That's exactly what I learned from a DM at a recent ConGame when I too "gained a level in gaming" - Rient's Rule #1: When in doubt, roll d6. All questions will be answered, all conundrums resolved, all mysteries solved with a "something in 6" chance.
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He's still figuring out what it means to roleplay, so I helped him along a little bit. I cleaned up the whole exchange for this post. Very cool! I do the same thing with my kids - helping them learn by asking questions, but not telling them what to do because they sometimes come up with the coolest things. What will be neat is to see what Nolan's character does with dwarf artifacts in the future. That kind of growth is why I keep going back behind the screen to DM.
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That's one of my favorite tactic - "You just killed that creature, tell me how you did it?" I've discovered my wife likes killing rats and goblins in really gruesome ways. :)
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I'm curious about this: "I want to do something about the statue," Nolan said. "I don't like that it's just all crumbled down there like that." "Sure," I said. "You spend some time gathering up the pieces as best as you can, and you say a prayer to Moradin. You feel a little better." Why did you tell him what he did? Was this just something that you wrote about that way, or did you actually DM-act for him? Please, this isn't a criticism of your DM-fu, I'm just curious about that. I'm curious because I think it would have been neat to ask Nolan what he would have wanted to do to make it better - possibly providing a "hook" possibility. If he'd made a big deal of praying to Moradin, maybe he gets a vision or something? Sometimes players really give us things to work with - my wife is doing that all the time in our solo game. I'm really glad you're doing this with family. I've gotten my wife into an ongoing (4 months now) solo OD&D game, my step son and my daughter are also playing in the same campaign world, but different party (different feel but same world) and my step daughter jumps in on occasion. These are good times for us.
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@David - the Blue Basic Book is the "Holmes" Basic D&D book. This was started in the mid/late 70s concurrent to EGG writing AD&D. It is fairly complete as a standalone game, although it stops at 3rd level and encourages people to buy AD&D for more. It's been discussed that Dr. Holmes wrote the Blue Book as a way of simplifying the Original D&D Little Brown Books and Supplements into a more coherent ruleset - it's certainly easy to compare the two and see direct lineage and compatibility. The boxed version that I have came with laminated "chits" instead of dice. Back in 79, I used those chits. It wasn't until I went to a game store that I learned/realized that I could get the dice locally.
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@WilW - Your tshirt "How We Roll" was seen in action at an old school AD&D game this weekend - thought it would be good karma seeing that you're grooving on some old school juice with the Basic set. Anytime you're in Chicago and you want to see how we roll, there's a spot at the table for you. http://oldguyrpg.blogspot.com/2009/03/we-game-dark-ages-mar-15.html
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I've learned that my best prep is to flesh out the outline, let my players drive the plot to fill in the places to go, and my notes for my "on the fly" rulings to fill in the details later on. Running a sandbox, I have to have enough for the players to explore, and have enough in the back of my head so I can fill in if the players decide to do something out in the hills. That's part of the fun for me.
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I prefer the 4E DMG to the older ones, because it is an actual guide to being a DM, instead of just a reference book. I've been rereading the 1E DMG as I'm currently running an OSRIC game (yay for OGL and fresh blood for 1Estyle games) and I find this tome was wildly unappreciated in my day. I read it then for the reference. I read it now and see so much more to it. If you can get a dead tree copy, I really encourage you to take a look at it with fresh eyes. I wish I had read it with experienced eyes 28 years ago.
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If you get a chance, grab the 1st Edition DMG - In looking between the two, I still "feel" D&D from the 1st Edition book much more than the 4th.
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You're welcome. It's what I wanted to do, and I was proud to serve and protect. (Sgt., USAF, 305th AREFW, SAC, Grissom AFB - 1986-1992)
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You're welcome. It's what I wanted to do, and I was proud to serve and protect. (Sgt., USAF, 305th AREFW, SAC, Grissom AFB - 1986-1992)
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@all those that are angry You have every right to be angry. I'm angry. I'm going to take that anger and do something with it. I'm going to take that anger and use it as fuel to get my ass out of bed early and go volunteer to make some of this vision become reality. I'm going to take that anger and work for change that I feel reflects what I believe in. I don't have to hide anymore, because there is an opportunity and a real need to make change. People are scared of their jobs. They're scared of their futures. They're scared that the world is really going tilt and that we might really see some seriously bad shit. I'm scared of those things to. I know what those people of the "Greatest Generation" (WWII) knew... that we're going to have to buck up and work hard, and sacrifice to make a future for our kids. The days of innocence, the days of everything is easy in the bubble are over. We're going to have to work hard, scrape by and save and be what our parents were doing in the 70s. I know this, so my anger at the injustice fuels me to work towards the changes and the sacrifices needed so my kids and grandkids can have a safe tomorrow. That's just me.
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@all those that are angry You have every right to be angry. I'm angry. I'm going to take that anger and do something with it. I'm going to take that anger and use it as fuel to get my ass out of bed early and go volunteer to make some of this vision become reality. I'm going to take that anger and work for change that I feel reflects what I believe in. I don't have to hide anymore, because there is an opportunity and a real need to make change. People are scared of their jobs. They're scared of their futures. They're scared that the world is really going tilt and that we might really see some seriously bad shit. I'm scared of those things to. I know what those people of the "Greatest Generation" (WWII) knew... that we're going to have to buck up and work hard, and sacrifice to make a future for our kids. The days of innocence, the days of everything is easy in the bubble are over. We're going to have to work hard, scrape by and save and be what our parents were doing in the 70s. I know this, so my anger at the injustice fuels me to work towards the changes and the sacrifices needed so my kids and grandkids can have a safe tomorrow. That's just me.
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