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chuckgoolsbee
Arlington, WA, USA
Bio -Diesel home-brewer. digital.forest Datacenter Geek. Photog/Writer. Road Scholar. The Harold Snepsts of the Apple Macintosh world. Mac-Mgrs List Mom since 1995.
Interests: Vintage Cars, Ice Hockey, Writing, Photography, Technology.
Recent Activity
Yep looks embarrassing. Also looks like the Westin Hotel downtown, but I could be wrong. I hope you enjoyed your brief stay in our fair city. --chuck
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Dr. No. Dr. Love was in a KISS song.
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"I'll be takin' these Huggies, and whatever Pachinko balls you've got there behind the counter..." (Hilarity ensues…) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ulJyGJM51OY
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...and I pull and epic comedy fail by mis-typing "its" (facepalm) --chuck
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Vulcans prefer Buicks, as the last Vulcan Emperor (before the Coombs took over after the Great Upheaval) was known to have loved the brand. It is only natural that Spock would gravitate to the Riviera due to it's graceful nacelles. --chuck
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As for the edit, the horizontal distortion of the car adds a huge distraction for me: The wheels are no longer round! They look like cartoonish eyes in a moment of surprise. Very unnatural and garishly out of place. The exposure correction washes out the color and eliminates the depth of reflected landscape on the car itself, something I love in good car photos. --chuck
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Diego's right, E-type bonnets are really that long. This windfarm along the Columbia River is very new, and is still literally going up as we speak. Those turbines were not yet operational. I was returning home with another Jag from a vintage car rally in Oregon and stopped here to wait for the other to catch up after a "pit stop"... Naturally I grabbed my camera! If anything these shots were taken to remind me to return to this spot when the light is better for some REALLY good photos. Stay tuned! --chuck
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See! ALWAYS listen to guys named Chuck. They know everything. I keep telling this to my wife, but she doesn't buy it. --chuck
Toggle Commented Sep 25, 2009 on unraveling the mystery at WWdN: In Exile
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How many times does Wil break a fast anyway? --chuck
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I can grok nine-ness. 9/9/09 is my 21st wedding anniversary. The wife wanted to get married on 9/2/88, and I asked her to wait one week. The nine-ness makes it hard to forget the date. ;) Any chance you can have these up on iTunes so my lazy ass will have them force-fed onto my iPod with minimal effort, or do we have to work for these? --chuck
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I was hiding in the back of the cooler with a pipe wrench. Next time reach a little farther and you're MINE!! Bwahhahhaaaaahhhaaaahhaaa!! --chuck
Toggle Commented Jul 6, 2009 on everything's drawn and super 80s at WWdN: In Exile
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I was hiding in the back of the cooler with a pipe wrench. Next time reach a little farther and you're MINE!!! bwahhahhaaaahhaaaahhaaaaa! --chuck
Toggle Commented Jul 6, 2009 on everything's drawn and super 80s at WWdN: In Exile
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Point thine Macintosh here for Psuedo-Centipedeal goodness. It is better than crack. --chuck
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Data: "Hey, man, these characters aren’t even real” Isn't Data programmatically unable to speak contractions? (my gawd, am I that pathetic?) BTW: I suggest Laphroig Cask Strength or Bruichladdich. --chuck (oh yeah, almost forgot [:Secret Goalie Handshake:])
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p "It's like a slap in the face to be associated with these people who claim to be like me, and want to be part of our culture, but couldn't tell you [snip] how to use vi or emacs." i I scoff at your mention of emacs! Only the mentally challenged, or the wannabe geek uses emacs! It is a slap in the face to be associated with these emacs users who claim to be like me, and couldn't tell you how to use the one true editor. --chuck !:wq
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OK, I finally watched it on Hulu... and I really only have one question for you Wil: You beamed in wearing a red shirt... and SURVIVED. How?? --
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"I let in only one goal that game. Late in the overtime period." Ouch! Oh that hurts... even to hear. --chuck
Toggle Commented Mar 27, 2009 on LA Times: through a goalie's eyes at WWdN: In Exile
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Just read the linked article. Well done. It brings up something I've always noted while attending hockey games. I LOVE to sit behind the net. For one thing it is how a Goalie sees the game. You really can appreciate the flow of the passing and skating game so much better from the end of the rink rather than the sides. Try it sometime. This perspective also helps you spot all your fellow goaltenders who are NOT on the ice. How? They are the ones who do not duck when shots hit the glass! :D --
Toggle Commented Mar 27, 2009 on LA Times: through a goalie's eyes at WWdN: In Exile
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"I wonder if being a goalie is... if you do your job right, you're totally invisible. If you screw up, though, everyone notices, the team begins to erode, and you get hung out to dry. " In a word, YES. Are we OK with that? Yes. Goalies are Geeks-on-skates... and we're OK with that too. Good luck between the pipes Will, we look forward to reading about your "comeback" ;) --chuck [secret handshake]
Toggle Commented Mar 27, 2009 on LA Times: through a goalie's eyes at WWdN: In Exile
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Enjoy the read. In fact I'll pull mine off the shelf and add it to my reading list. I loved the Curtis Curve. It provided a full-stick on-ice surface. I can not recall how many "OMG" saves I made off the handle, but it was a lot. The recurve at the top provided that extra atlatl "oomph" leverage to my shot that turned my wimpy clearing passes into full-fledged Hextall-like rockets. The design moved from one brand to the next, and I faithfully bought 2-3 sticks each year as it changed, giving up my lifelong (to that point) allegiance to Koho. For those that have no idea what we're talking about, here's a picture. --chuck
Toggle Commented Mar 26, 2009 on Books I Love: Open Net at WWdN: In Exile
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Wil, [secret goalkeeper handshake] have you read Ken Dryden's "The Game"? Dryden was my childhood hero, and the guy is likely one of the smarter nutbars to carry the big stick. He famously left the Canadiens for a year to do his law clerk duties(!) when he finished Law School (while playing, full time and winning Stanley Cups!) Do you still play at all? I had a cement-head D dump a guy, and himself... of course, onto me causing my right knee to bend in several unnatural ways. A career-ending injury. Mind you this was just a "beer league" game when I was an adult, but NOT being able to play is truly painful for me mentally. I always found goaltending to be such a Zen activity, requiring such total mental focus that it shut my "10,000 RPM" brain down enough so that I could actually function better when I wasn't playing. Odd I know, but I guess you just have to have a brain like mine to understand... it needs to be turned off once in awhile. I'd trade just about anything for the chance to skate back to the crease and play again. BTW I was rummaging around in my basement a few weeks ago looking for something and I found a band-new, never used, un-taped stick, complete with "Curtis Curve" setup (that ring any bells?) --chuck
Toggle Commented Mar 25, 2009 on Books I Love: Open Net at WWdN: In Exile
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I lived for a while when I was a kid in Montana, and miss it every day, and go back to visit whenever I can. If I could make a living there I'd move back in a heartbeat. Cold doesn't bother me! --chuck
Toggle Commented Feb 28, 2009 on my awesome brother at WWdN: In Exile
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"and listening to the radio meant hearing the same 27 songs every two and-a-half hours" Actually that part hasn't changed. We've just stopped listening to the radio. Unfortunately the byproduct of that process is a lot of good radio is being killed off and replaced with even MORE bad radio. Sigh. --chuck
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I never said that the fighting was disciplined (far from it) I said that fighting itself is a form of discipline. It is used to keep the rest of the active play from getting out of control. Your next query will be "Isn't that what the referees are for?"... I started wearing stripes for beer money in college and eventually worked my way up to refereeing College and European professional hockey, so believe me when I say that it is impossible for the on-ice officials to see everything and a lot of 'chippy' play goes on that technically doesn't violate the rules enough to get called. The idea that if you ride the team's star in a certain way means that some six-foot-ten cement-head will be out there for your next shift to play patty-cake with you acts as a deterrent. So plainly said: Fighting prevents potentially more dangerous stick-play. It is subtle and brutal. But it is a fact. The truth is that the potential for serious injury is much higher from a cross-check or a hit from behind than it is from fisticuffs. HTH --chuck PS: where I do agree with you is the "Slap-shot" style fighting for fighting's sake, which includes lunacy like bench-clearing brawls. As a goaltender I always saw fights as a nice mental vacation. A chance for me to take the mask off, wash the sweat off my face, and not focus like a damn laser beam on that little disc of vulcanized rubber. I never entertained the idea of skating down to the other guy in the Ancient Brotherhood and dropping my gloves. Maybe I'd go there and have a chat about leg pad technology or ask him about that nice catching glove... but fight? Never!
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