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Cobb
LOS ANGELES, CA
Dad. Architect. Writer. Entrepreneur.
Interests: gaming, bourbon, gadgets, big data, multitouch interfaces, game theory, theology, political & analytic philosophy, computer augmented decision support, spycraft, creole cuisine, asian jazz fusion, bbq, electronica, historical fiction, beef cattle, fast cars, and anything that fits into a 19 inch rack.
Recent Activity
My life matters. That should be obvious. How could it not? But I'm not representing myself as having a #BlackLife that matters. I'm not that kind of commodity. I own my own blackness and it's not up for symbolic manipulation.... Continue reading
Posted Mar 22, 2015 at Cobb
Problem: Determine how many people are at the beach on the 4th of July. Solution 1: Big Data Analytics - minded Take a fleet of quadcopter drones and have them take thousands of snapshots of the people on the beach.... Continue reading
Posted Mar 20, 2015 at Cubegeek
Is it ever proper for the law to support capital punishment? The short answer is yes, but I've got a nuance I've been thinking about. It is found in the recourse for suicide. The death penalty is an institutionalized form... Continue reading
Posted Mar 18, 2015 at Cobb
Paul Shaffer is not political at all. If the world were to crumble around him, he'd still say 'whatever dude'. Everything's a joke to him. He represents a kind of naive apathy that is also very Boomer. Larry David is uptight and Paul Shaffer is mellow, the combination reinforce the strident idiocy of the Larry Davids of the world. I happen to like Paul Shaffer, and I'd rather make the example of Jimmy Buffet, but I really know nothing about Buffet's personality at all. If he's a weed-smoking layabout, he would make the better example. Jokey and smokey and permanently immature. That's the attitude I'm trying to capture. "Don't call me Mr. Shaffer, that's my father", says a 60 year old man.
Toggle Commented Mar 18, 2015 on Giuliani v Obama at Cobb
1 reply
If it were the case, that would be easy enough to prove. But the larger point is that this is another species of radical autonomy that demands a multiculturally sensitive message for every political identity. Political identity trumps policy.
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2015 on Giuliani v Obama at Cobb
1 reply
Former NYC mayor Rudy Giuliani doesn't like Obama. Recently he's been telling folks that Obama ought to be more like Bill Cosby and take a lot of black Americans to task for their self-evident distance from the norms of civil... Continue reading
Posted Mar 13, 2015 at Cobb
As 'Chief Iteration Officer' at Full360 my mantra is 'iterate to quality'. That means preserve what you know and get a little bit better every day. I have always been from the Deming School and don't often advocate the Hammer... Continue reading
Posted Mar 12, 2015 at Cobb
As 'Chief Iteration Officer' at Full360 my mantra is 'iterate to quality'. That means preserve what you know and get a little bit better every day. I have always been from the Deming School and don't often advocate the Hammer... Continue reading
Posted Mar 12, 2015 at Cubegeek
Both, and then some. What I've been involved in is enabling initiatives that are part of what goes under the heading of 'Transformation Services' that are sold by the big accounting / consulting firms. So my technical skills were sold as part of a package, say by Deloitte, in preparing a bank for a merger or new regulations. So I have to be able to talk to management and understand the direction they're going and design systems accordingly. I've also done so as part of a software company selling technology into the space, and I've done a whole lot as an independent contractor or lead consultant on a team from a specific subcontractor where all they care about is my technical expertise. So I have been doing similar work through 4 generations of technology going back to 1986 or so. But it has always been about building the systems that upper level management actually looks at and uses to determine how well the business is doing. That's my sweet spot. What I've become very good at is wedding the technology to the business process and calling out bullshit in either. Now that I'm in my 50s I can say 'thats bullshit' in meetings and be taken seriously. It's the best part of the job. Most of my work has been with financials, but I've also done loyalty programs, inventories, manufacturing quality, HR, aviation, energy KPIs and crazy one-off stuff. My recommendation would be (if you're going to call yourself a data scientist) is to get into the biggest customer you can find and stay put as long as possible. I'd hate to be among those crowds looking for work for long - because right now there is a bubble, and that bubble is going to pop within a year. Concurrently with that learn statistics at the highest level you possibly can. That will serve you much better than glomming on to any technology. I'tll tell you exactly what's going to happen. IBM, HP, SAP, Oracle, MSFT and SAS are all within a year or so going to ramp up their marketing and convince everybody who is guessing right now, that they have comprehensive 'data science' products, and its going to freeze the Global 2000 out of the reach of every independent on the planet, except for those smart enough to build better products than IBM, HP ,etc. Then once that's done, in two or three years, those same guys are going to swoop down and acquire all the serious competitors in the space. And you're either going to be somebody with 3 years of experience with the IBM Watson Data Scientist Suite or you're going to be pounding the pavement. Again. Try to remember how many people thought they were going to make a fortune selling iOS apps three years ago. The safest place to be is making 20% less than the going rate of a 'data scientist' in a company (like Caterpillar, or Weyerhauser or Comercia Bank) that's never going out of business and doesn't make a habit of trying to be sexy. Then you actually have time to learn all the statistics there is to know, you have a stupid unsexy title, but you really know your shit. The worst place to be is the highly paid 'data scientist' in some startup in San Francisco whose CEO is 32 years old, already has a million in the bank and is doing the VC shuffle selling his 'next generation' whatever I need to say to get funding and figure out my exit strategy. Which may be able to do 1/3 of the actual statistical math but sells it to other newbie companies with a sexy interface.
Toggle Commented Mar 11, 2015 on Essbase Capacity Planning (1997) at Cobb
1 reply
I was just involved in a discussion and meta-discussion about the recent flap over some outrageous fraternity prank in Oklahoma. I only judge it to be outrageous because clearly people who had paid attention to the details were outraged. I... Continue reading
Posted Mar 11, 2015 at Cobb
If you want to know what I believe, it is that the answer is out there. You just don't want to figure it out. I had an interesting experience the other day over at Quora. Quora is a general question... Continue reading
Posted Mar 8, 2015 at Cobb
See Also Metric Land - https://www.evernote.com/shard/s6/sh/f7206e8e-60d9-4d5d-95c9-3601dd762114/2aa32d45ea0c5a029e0457d5d585103d
Toggle Commented Mar 8, 2015 on The Persistence of 360 at Cobb
1 reply
You only use HDFS because you have masses of unstructured data spweing from sharded web services. No matter what you call it, it's still a file system. If you're clever enough to Hive and Pig your way into something resembling an analytic schema, you very likely have map reduced all of that log crap into something resembling a data warehouse. But I still really haven't seen any reason why anybody would run a data warehouse on HDFS. It doesn't make sense to me. Big structured data shouldn't go to HDFS. Next, it is my distinct impression that whatever you R, you're doing for 1-5 people. I don't listen, but I've never heard of multiuser concurrent read write systems of R. Essbase is a multiuser concurrent read write database with security down to the cell level. When you get data prepared to share with a team of executives and managers in an analytical model that allows you to do multiple forecasts, budgets, contingency scenario planning and that stuff, then you call out Essbase. What's big for Essbase? > 20GB per model. That would be something like a 7 dimensional profitability model for 500 segments of customers. So basically I would do something like use R to design 500 segments of customers over 10 demographic dimensions of 10,000,000 folks. Use HDFS to map reduce the 10 million down to 500 market segments, then put those 500 in Essbase and plan for 500 customer segments - not 10 million individual customers.
Toggle Commented Mar 3, 2015 on Essbase Capacity Planning (1997) at Cobb
1 reply
Glad to be of service. I will always own the domain mdcbowen.org. So no matter where I go or what I do, there will be pointers there. Cheers.
Toggle Commented Feb 27, 2015 on The Four Pillars of Business Intelligence at Cobb
1 reply
The most important thing about backing up important files is that you do it yourself, fairly often and redundantly in different media. That way, over time, you'll have opportunities to rescue data that is important to you, and then you'll... Continue reading
Posted Feb 26, 2015 at Cubegeek
There are also Four (that I can think of right now) Barriers to value add. NR - Not Relevant NA - Not Actionable NS - Not Sufficient NE - Not Efficient Imagine, for example, that your automobile has 100 sensors... Continue reading
Posted Feb 24, 2015 at Cubegeek
This entry is a pointer to a couple capacity planning documents. The first one I created was back in 1997, which I updated last in 1999. The 1999 Capacity Planning Document is embedded in the extended entry. (Format sucks) The... Continue reading
Posted Feb 20, 2015 at Cobb
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The following is my route around the site. My realtime audio recording is here: Download TorranceExplosion (yeah I know I said the wrong date at the end. Today is the 18th not the 17th.) I drove clockwise around the refinery.... Continue reading
Posted Feb 18, 2015 at Cobb
BI - What is it? BI is business intelligence. It is the art and science of getting computers to know and think in ways humans do not do well, but need to know in order to better run their businesses.... Continue reading
Posted Feb 2, 2015 at Cobb
BI - What is it? BI is business intelligence. It is the art and science of getting computers to know and think in ways humans do not do well, but need to know in order to better run their businesses.... Continue reading
Posted Feb 2, 2015 at Cubegeek
It certainly can be helped. The classic example is how Weyerhauser changed the way they managed the forests they owned by carefully inventorying what they harvest against what they plant. They simply will never sell more than what they can produce. I'm pretty sure this is standard in the wood and paper products industry. I think that's possible because these are not consumer goods, but I think companies that provide consumer goods are more likely to screw up. Of course wood is a renewable resource and it's easier to manage than say ocean fish...
Toggle Commented Jan 30, 2015 on But I Can Afford It at Cobb
1 reply
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I just skimmed through a story about bluefin tuna. Apparently, we are about to run out. But yet it's everywhere. It makes me think about what might be a fatal flaw in our form of capitalism, and raises the following... Continue reading
Posted Jan 29, 2015 at Cobb
That's precisely it. I was originally going to assign these to 'SF Time Travel', but time travel is always science fiction, and ultimately the quality of the fiction has to do with how well it handles flirting with causality. I like Groundhog Day because it explores the gamut of human emotions wrapped up in the paradox, and yet it deals nicely with what I believe to be true if time travel were possible. There aren't multiple universes and causality is what it is, IE there can be no butterfly effect because the energy of local events is irrelevant to remote events. It would be like saying if a star exploded in space, it would change human destiny. Stars in space explode all the time. But things that are going to happen, generally do happen, and the larger area events retain their equilibrium. I recall reading 'Connecticut Yankee' as a kid. Forgot about that one.
Toggle Commented Jan 28, 2015 on My Top Ten Time Travel Movies at Cobb
1 reply
Now I'm going to say right up front that Terminator, Back to the Future, Pleasantville and Peggy Sue Got Married are not going to make the list. I just don't think they're good enough and I don't possess the sentiment... Continue reading
Posted Jan 27, 2015 at Cobb