This is Coruskate's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Coruskate's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Coruskate
Recent Activity
Interesting article. My responses to a couple of the comments: First: "[...] where the content is Creative Common (or similar) and legitimately reproduced. In this case, there is no reason why Google should automatically give the first publisher a better ranking: if some of the scrappers published it in a "better" (whatever the metrics) way for the searcher, why shouldn't it get a higher placement?" As a consumer I would rather reward (with traffic) the content creators for making knowledge available to mankind than I would the scrapers who have not generated anything new. By doing this, I assume, I am encouraging them to continue to create content - looking at the scrapers instead is less likely to have that effect. So, the scrapers are by definition not "better" and if the metrics think they are then the metrics are broken. Second point: the categorisation into "social" and "algorithmic" search seems to me terminologically inexact when a key element of the "algorithmic" search is which sites have incoming links from other people. If those links are put there by people, that's a pretty social algorithm ;-) Perhaps the distinction would better be drawn between "anonymous" and "personal social" search.
Toggle Commented Jan 4, 2011 on Trouble In the House of Google at Coding Horror
The problem with lettting the tickets find their market value, I assume, is that the artists would rather perform to "real fans", and "real fans" are not necessarily rich people. So what combination of economic incentives (and to whom) is required for an artist to select "only people we like the company of" as his audience? Perhaps attendees should be required to post some kind of security bond which is forfeited if at the end of the night the performer doesn't feel they've been "a tremendous audience, we love you all". Or if they don't sing loud enough in the singalong.
Instructions for Chrome pretty much work, but need a little imagination At step 4 4) Click on the blacklists tab 5) Click on Edit 6) Paste the two lines twitter.com##div[id="recommended-similar-users"] twitter.com##div[id="recommended_users"] into the edit box 7) click "save" Changes should take effect when you reload the twitter page. I didn't need to restart Chrome or anything like that This is using Chrome 5.0.375.99 on Linux, YMMV with other versions
Coruskate is now following The Typepad Team
Aug 9, 2010