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Adam Smith
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Thanks for your work on Summer of Tech, John. That sounds like great stuff!!!
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The next one will be more inspirational, I promise : )
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Also great points ichthyos!
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..especially if they help find the terrorists!!
Toggle Commented Sep 13, 2010 on Crazy Idea Sunday at Adam Smith's Blog
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Sure is! ThanksDdovgopoliy! Adam
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James -- that is awesome. I am sending you an email. datingbutnothappy -- wow that sucks. reminds me of the twitter attack in 2009 that relied on these plaintext password emails.
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Thanks for the comment, Mark. Very thoughtful.
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@Adamac -- yes Amazon would probably respond by either (a) lowering prices to their top customers, or (b) making their pricing model more complex at the high end of scale so as to remove the pricing arbitrage opportunity. Though if you are willing to be a cowboy with data safety you could get pretty exotic with the redundancy elimination and huge-data-set compression algorithms. If that happened then you would expect a new player could compete against Amazon based on technology / IP. (!)
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Hi Adamac, thanks for your comment! I knew about Squeezeboxes, but not about Rocketfish! Rocketfish is definitely the more interesting of the two to this concept. They have a $60 'wireless sender/receiver'. That is very, very cool. It seems like they're missing the pieces of software that really makes the system sing, though, most notably the virtual sound card and iphone remote software. Still, very cool.
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Mar 15, 2010
Hi Robert, thanks for your comment. I dont know Jeff Atwood or Joel Spolsky that well, and I havent listened to many of their podcasts, so you know more than I do and I cant comment on this specific situation. That said, behaviors or attitudes in a founder like the ones you mention would not scare me off from putting money into a company. Passion is a higher order bit than business savvy. Business savvy is also something that a first time founder tends to grow from scratch during their first 2-6 years, whereas passion is something that one should not expect to grow over time. Id also note that amateurs often beat suits because it turns out that getting the product and company culture right early on matters 1000x more than business hygiene. (Im not saying this applies to the StackOverflow case directly.) Thanks again for the comment Robert. Very interesting topics. Adam
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Sorry for the late reply Tom. Not surprisingly a great comment! I do see your distinction. Most questions on Quora today are factual, e.g. How many people work at X? Or Which startups has Mitch Kapor invested in? Whereas Hunch definitely has more of a recommendation flavor to it. Itll be interesting to which extent these categories remain separate.
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Hi Freddy, I am familiar with the eyefi. I don't have one but love the concept. It's a great example of the need for camera software platforms as they could easily do 3x more if they could interact with the user via UI!
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Thanks Jake!!
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Thanks for the link, @JeffC. That's a very interesting article. I think it's a bit far to say that Google may be complicit in the attacks. It seems clear, and logical, that Google has an automated system to service search warrants. And it's not surprising to me that that system was involved in the attack vector. All of that is fine to me. This sentence summarizes the position well: "More to the point, one might find it ironic that Google takes such a hard-line public stand in favor of Chinese dissidents who wish to evade Chinese law enforcement, but regards potential U.S. dissidents who wish to evade U.S. law enforcement as rightly subject to arbitrary surveillance." The whole point of our justice system is that US dissidents are subject to fair laws and due process, that they have certain freedoms but are still subject to US and local laws. So when it comes to China where folks don't have many of the freedoms we consider to be critical to a fair and well functioning society, we get to take the egocentric (and I think correct) position of trying to effect those freedoms on them as best we can. But when we're talking about domestically, if I am forced to paint with broad strokes, I do think the government should have the rights that it has. For the most part. No system is perfect, and there are still many problems. But due process, human rights, a death penalty on its way out the door, and most fundamentally a process for positive change over time (legislators, the press, an information-driven society, etc) make it one of the best systems in the world, and one which I think is due a lot of credit.
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For folks who implement the entire login flow in AJAX, these sites usually avoid HTTPS because they're limited by the same origin policy (see: wikipedia). There's a well understood workaround here: http://www.west-wind.com/Weblog/posts/107136.aspx
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@someone, I understand this attitude. I do hope it will become rarer over time as we give users better tools for identifying sites that dont protect passwords in transport. In fact, maybe Firefox should indicate to users when their password are sent in the clear. Browsers already know which fields are password fields. Will think about that one. In this particular case let me know if theres any way I can help / lower the cost for them. All the best!, Adam
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@Ethan, that is amazing! Great job, and thanks! Adam
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@Jose, some sites have login pages that are http but that use https for sending the actual password. That's why I used a packet sniffer -- so I'd get the bare results instead of trying to read code. In this case MySpace actually does secure the password during transport. @TicketmasterUser, I'll check it out! I'm also going to check out plentyoffish.com, which a Hacker News poster reported. Though sites used by foreigners worry me the most. @frustrated, to be honest my web skills are below par. You can always https the entire login page but it takes a workaround I believe in order to e.g. Javascript POST over https when the main page is http.
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@est: very cool! Thanks for the pointer! @njharman: yes, good point. Since the RIAA stopped suing people this might be a solution in search of a problem. It still might have relevance to internet censorship workarounds, though. (?) @Wes: wow thanks for the links! You guys are awesome! Good point on the metadata. Wow, it's humbling to see people doing this in research since 2001! I also submitted an update to the Monolith wikipedia page discussing "possible extensions" including pseudorandom basis files, and a plausible deniability idea submitted by the Hacker News commenter cookingrobot. Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monolith_(computer_program)
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Great points Rajat. I really enjoy the Steve Jobs / Bill Gates interview you mentioned. For everyone else it's available at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5Z7eal4uXI . Those guys are amazing.
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Thanks Seymour. Nice blog on public speaking!
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yes, that's true Marissa! I've been thinking lately with a "capital allocation" hat on after reading Warren Buffet's quote about how he's so lucky to be living in a time when allocating capital is a lucrative job. ...if only there were some way to get in the middle of that allocation step and capture some of the wealth. maybe a "this is what you should do with your career" service.....interesting.. THANKS for the comment!!!
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Thanks for the comment Cujo. That sounds convincing and about right though I think in limited cases you can drop the bar one notch and have things work out. My favorite story about this: one of our developers did mediocre in my on site interview. BUT I was the last interview of the day so he was tired. Our head of engineering had also worked with him at a previous company and had great experiences working with the candidate. He had also done some impressive win32 hacking that I understood and admired. During the interview he said "I don't know why this is tripping me up. It shouldn't be." If I were the hiring manager for that spot I would have still said no hire. But our head of engineering hired him (always empower your hiring manager) and he has worked out very well. Note there were a ton of other positive signals, most notably that someone had worked with him before quite successfully. Thanks again for the comment!
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hi there un-named Weebly! (David?) How do you look for personality and team fit during the in person interview? Much of it must be subtle social cues and things like that, but can any more be said? Thanks!, Adam
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