This is www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=24208086's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=24208086's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=24208086
Recent Activity
Image
Noritake Sestina Relish Butter Tray (pictured) Wag's Revue is offering up a "Syllable Sestina Challenge" based on an exercise from the Oulipo listserv, in which a sestina is composed with only six syllables. Poetry editor Will Guzzardi admits it may be easier to complete the challenge in French than English, but it doesn't stop him from giving it a try with "The Masturbating Sign." Submit your sestina before March 1, 2010 and you may be published in a showcase on Wag's Revue with other sestinaistas! Continue reading
Posted Feb 10, 2010 at The Best American Poetry
Image
This is a love letter. Not an exegesis. Not a manifesto. Not a new notion. This is a thank you note. I met Andrew Hughes in January 2002, during my final residency at the Bennington College Writing Seminars. Andy was the first editor outside of a school literary journal to accept a poem of mine for publication. He and Whit Griffin started Tight in 2001 while undergraduates at Bennington. I was fortunate enough to be included in the second issue, which also features work from Jonathan Williams, John Coletti, Russell Dillon, Stephen Sandy, Anselm Berrigan, Amy Gerstler, Pierre Joris, Thomas... Continue reading
Posted Feb 6, 2010 at The Best American Poetry
He always demanded an audience: yet in the end, though he included the critic, though his self-consciousness grew noisy and acute, his finest efforts seemed mainly for his peers. Constance Rourke "Chest Fever" was written as a reaction to "The Weight." It is what Robertson refers to as a "vibes" song. "At the time I'm thinking, 'Wait a minute, where are we going here with Buñuel and all of these ideas and the abstractions and all of the mythology?' This music, for us, started on something that felt good and sounded good and who cares. 'Chest Fever' was like, here's... Continue reading
Posted Feb 5, 2010 at The Best American Poetry
He always demanded an audience: yet in the end, though he included the critic, though his self-consciousness grew noisy and acute, his finest efforts seemed mainly for his peers. Constance Rourke "Chest Fever" was written as a reaction to "The Weight." It is what Robertson refers to as a "vibes" song. "At the time I'm thinking, 'Wait a minute, where are we going here with Buñuel and all of these ideas and the abstractions and all of the mythology?' This music, for us, started on something that felt good and sounded good and who cares. 'Chest Fever' was like, here's... Continue reading
Posted Feb 5, 2010 at The Best American Poetry
Image
"Nobody should experience anything they don’t need to, if they don’t need poetry bully for them. I like the movies too. And after all, only Whitman and Crane and Williams, of the American poets, are better than the movies." Frank O'Hara's famous "Personism" manifesto is one of the great modern expressions of American Transcendentalism. It reminds you that poetry isn't a form but a way. Just because a piece of text is written in lines doesn't make it a poem. Nor does a poem have to take the form of words necessarily. Anything that works well, that does the thing... Continue reading
Posted Feb 4, 2010 at The Best American Poetry
10
Image
My father suffered a series of brain seizures due to sleep apnea at the end of August '09 and I, his only child, was responsible for taking care of him (my mother passed away from breast cancer in 1995). So I flew down to Naples, Florida. He didn't know who I was. He would answer your question with the same question. You could tell he was fighting, tell there was some recognition in his eyes, but the engine wasn't turning. The first few weeks were scary, but he soon began to recover. I returned to Vermont with a promise to... Continue reading
Posted Feb 3, 2010 at The Best American Poetry
Image
In the past year (at least) I've made several attempts to write a long piece about Charles North's excellent 2007 book Cadenza. Each time, I've faltered. I think my best course of action is to apply for a grant and, Gideons-like, use the money to place not just Cadenza but all his other books into hotel rooms across the country. The book would act both as reading material, the artwork that adorns the walls, and the rural radio station. I'd like to call his style something like "Transcendental Objectivist" but I don't want the responsibility. The book's title poem is... Continue reading
Posted Feb 2, 2010 at The Best American Poetry
Image
An open letter to the Nobel Committee No American-born poet has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for his/her country. Eliot was a British citizen and, despite the fact that he could never hide his St. Louis roots, we must consider that. Of himself Milosz said: "I am a Lithuanian to whom it was not given to be a Lithuanian." Brodsky, when asked, replied: "I am Jewish—a Russian poet and an English essayist." What does this matter? Poetry knows no geographical or even temporal boundaries. Yet it would be naïve not to acknowledge that Laureates are often chosen because... Continue reading
Posted Feb 1, 2010 at The Best American Poetry
Image
I was born in Concord, Massachusetts. Raised in Connecticut. Brookfield for the first eight years, four years in Marietta, Georgia (home of the Big Chicken and the Georgia Satellites), then back to Southbury, my hometown if I have one. The state's branded no country for young men, a place you go when you have a family and want to keep them safe. Surely that was my father's logic. I understand. He's from Brooklyn. But Connecticut is a supremely weird place. Brothers Dave and Jake Longstreth are from Connecticut. I went to high school with Jake, a talented artist who reminds... Continue reading
Posted Jan 31, 2010 at The Best American Poetry
Image
I was born in Concord, Massachusetts. Raised in Connecticut. Brookfield for the first eight years, four years in Marietta, Georgia (home of the Big Chicken and the Georgia Satellites), then back to Southbury, my hometown if I have one. The state's branded no country for young men, a place you go when you have a family and want to keep them safe. Surely that was my father's logic. I understand. He's from Brooklyn. But Connecticut is a supremely weird place. Brothers Dave and Jake Longstreth are from Connecticut. I went to high school with Jake, a talented artist who reminds... Continue reading
Posted Jan 31, 2010 at The Best American Poetry
www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=24208086 is now following The Typepad Team
Dec 24, 2009