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This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. Don't Pick the Flowers 11-21-14 Bazoobee 11-22-14 11-22-14 11-23-14 Mid-Life w/Alan 11-23-14 11-24-14 11-24-14 Onion & Pea 11-24-14 11-24-14 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Laugh Tracks
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Fans of R. Crumb's work know that old-time and early recorded music, inluding the Blues, have always been a key area of interest for him. (Witness his book Heroes of Blues, Jazz & Country.) Here's a fascinating article about one important influence -- The Amazing Old Paramount Records Ads That Inspired R.Crumb. This video, which runs with the article, has some of his amazing bleues drawings: Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Laugh Tracks
Today's review: David Stanford, aide de sherpa I thank Francis Bonnet for volunteering for this public week-long editorial review of his strip Suburban Fairy Tales -- which concludes with today's installment. (If you've been snowed in, sans internet, you can quickly catch up by going here, here, here, and here.) I admire that Francis has been creating this comic strip with such discipline for so long. It is no small thing. He has been posting his work on Sherpa for most of Sherpa's existence -- and for a good portion of his own. I've often found that reading a book collection (or binge-reading online) can deepen your appreciation of a strip. In this case it's helped me see things more clearly. I always enjoy reading Suburban Fairy Tales, but I have also felt that I want something more. So what follows is me focusing on what I like, pointing out things that seem not as strong, and overall trying to figure out what that "more" might be. *** Your premise: fairy tale figures living in suburbia, most of them younger versions of themselves and hence in school. In committing to this concept you took a huge shortcut, one which pays off but also exacts a price. The payoff: You immediately assembled a huge cast of characters that readers are already familiar with, whose personalities and traits and backstories are, to varying degrees, known. The price: Although you get to create your own versions of these characters you are limited by their familiarity, and have to stay within the general boundaries of who they already are, and the expectations of readers. So you have traded some of your classic cartoonist freedom -- to create characters and a world of your own -- and thereby took possession of a very deep body of material with which to work, rich in reference points and options and opportunities. You have a lot of characters, and only in binge-reading did I sort them all out. Goldilocks and Rapunzel I confuse, and sometimes I don't recognize Pinocchio until he lies. Some of your characters seem more solid and filled out, others more like sketches. For me the biggest plus of the school setting is the teacher/witch Mrs. Hagatha (bonus: she evokes, for me, the witch in Little Lulu). And I like Little Pig 3, who is diarmingly self-aware. I enjoy their interactions: 5-7-12 2-11-11 I am also particularly fond of The Gingerbread Man. He's so lucky that he has a theme song which you can endlessly riff off of. 2-25-09 His strips are often full of action, which livens things up. 4-17-09 Humpty-Dumpty I like because you've put him in exactly the place he shouldn't be. A seemingly fragile fellow living the reckless life with confidence; that has archetypal resonance. 11-19-12 3-7-14 The Pied Piper and his mice-followers I like because, again, they are usually moving. There may be more to explore here beyond the occasional run-by, but whenever they show up it's fun. 5-13-09 Frog... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at Laugh Tracks
This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. Candace 'n' Company 11-18-14 Courageous Man Adventures 11-18-14 Regular Creatures 11-18-14 Spectickles 11-18-14 11-18-14 Mustard and Boloney 11-19-14 Spectickles 11-20-14 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Laugh Tracks
This is the fourth post in our week-long editorial review of the Sherpa feature Suburban Fairy Tales. In case you are just tuning in, you can catch up by going here, here, and here. Today's review is by John Glynn, the president of Universal Uclick: I started at the June 2, 2014 comic. Overall it’s sorta cute. However as far as the LOLQ (laugh out loud quotient) it scored pretty low. LOLQ is a made-up term of course. But imagine if it wasn't? My goodness those would be splendid days indeed! I did think a few gags were cute, a couple clever, but most were stock and predictable. Sorry. Sorry. Sorry. Not to hurt feelings, just one man's opinion, of course. PROS: -- I like that you move the camera around. -- For the most part, the characters are likable. I like the 7-14-14 strip. The last panel is strong, and the repeat of the facial expression and body language is good: 7-16-14 is a good gag too. Pearls-like: 7-18-14 has a good set up (though I'm not sure how it fits into Fairy Tales) but the last panel is a bit overwritten; the woman’s line (is that Goldilocks?) should be tighter: - CONS: -- The premise locks the creator into a Shrek-like world, which is a tough thing to live up to or break away from, from a creative standpoint. -- There are lots of characters, making it hard to get a feel for complexity or nuance in any one of them. -- The characters, setups, and payoffs are a little too sitcom-like (this feels more Charles in Charge than Seinfeld or The Office). And that's the rub; there's just not enough that I can see that differentiates the strip. Because that is what it has to be -- familiar enough the editors will understand it without too much explanation (which I think this is) but also different enough that it's distinguishable from the other strips that may have the same types of talking animal characters on the comics page. And it has to be funny too. It's really not an easy thing to come up with. -- The art is not bad, but it’s simple almost to its detriment. Simple is fine, but you have to be careful about balancing simple and backgrounds. If you want to be simple, mirror Pearls Before Swine and Dilbert (in both of which you’ll note the lack of environmental details that are not essential to the gag, and character placement as almost always in the forefront). -- Sometimes the backgrounds can distract from the main characters. Example -- panel one of 6-9-14: And the last panel of 6-20-14: -- I'm not crazy about the facial features on the characters. The mouths are odd, and seem stuck in one or two talking poses. The eyes do not do enough to convey emotions. I suggest you play around with expressions and eye placement more. Some strips are too wordy. You could have cut the... Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Laugh Tracks
1-8-14 1-17-14 2-19-14 I wanted to start this post with a few Suburban Fairy Tales strips, just to get us back into that world; the strips above aren't referred to in the critique below, which is the second installment in our four-part editorial review. The first installment was yesterday, and I introduced the feature on Monday. --DS Today's comments are by Universal Uclick editor Lucas Wetzel: Suburban Fairy Tales is a great title and a fun concept, but too often it reads like a simplistic soap opera instead of a strip in which the characters' unusual talents and identities are put to use to help them deal with the challenges of modern living. When the strip does do this (the Pied Piper employing rats to fetch him pizza, for example) it's good for a chuckle. 12-17-08 Most of the time, however, the characters are one-dimensional — selfish, insecure or annoyed — with the interaction rarely more complex than the plot of an average "Saved By The Bell" episode. The 4/8/9 strip felt a little homophobic, perhaps unintentionally: Others, like the 4/30/12 strip where the pig interacts with his spelling tutor, are more amusing. In general I just didn't feel like this was an actual comic strip as much as a collection of familiar tropes of fairy tale characters' most recognizable traits. These traits should be used to add a little extra intrigue and character to the strip, but shouldn't be used as a substitute for actual events and dialogue. I would recommend narrowing down the characters and trying to write some punchlines that don't depend on Humpty Dumpty being an egg or the Frog Prince being worried about looking like a frog. Then see what kinds of identities emerge, and take some time to identify and create a web of relationships from which more nuanced exchanges, misunderstandings and humorous interactions can occur. The art and line work are nice and clean, with good facial expressions and visual balance. But the strip needs to break new ground, tell new stories and breathe new life into these characters. rather than just retell fairy tale episodes like the Gingerbread Man who doesn’t think he can be caught. Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Laugh Tracks
For those just tuning in, this is the first installment of a four-part editorial review of the Sherpa comic strip Suburban Fairy Tales. I introduced the strip yesterday, and include the above strip just for fun; it is not referred to in the comments below. And away we go! -- DS Today's commentary is from Shena Wolf, UU's Acquisitions Editor: There are a lot of things that this strip is doing well, and some areas that could be strengthened. I think that the depth of the world is really good, the differentiation in characters that comes across in the writing, and some of the humor is very solid. I like what you’re doing with the backgrounds in the forest scenes. Very complicated, lots going on, nice camera POV changes. I like some of the running gags (pun unintended), particularly the Gingerbread Man. The longer story lines are interesting but I’d suggest watching out for getting too text heavy. It isn’t that you’re necessarily overwriting, but there are some good art opportunities that are being missed because panels are turning into walls of text. There are some art issues -- this is such a rich world visually that I find myself wishing the art (human character art, particularly, as the stylized look is working pretty well for the fairy tale animals) was more polished. There are a lot of pretty groan-worthy puns, which I only point out because there are some pretty sophisticated setups and punchlines that work really well. There’s a lot of humor in the strip, and the bad puns seem like a step back for the writing. Tomorrow: Editor Lucas Wetzel Continue reading
Posted Nov 17, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. Batch Rejection 11-14-14 County Line 11-14-14 Green Pieces 11-14-14 Kirby's Treehouse 11-14-14 Elmo 11-15-14 Frank Blunt 11-16-14 Good With Coffee 11-16-14 11-16-14 Regular Creatures 11-17-14 Snow Sez... 11-17-14 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted Nov 17, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
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Welcome to the second-ever Sherpa Review, a week-long series of posts in which Universal Uclick editors offer comments, suggestions, and feedback on one feature. Today's post gives some background information, and offers you the chance to familiarize yourself with the work. The next four days will each offer a different editorial take. Title: Suburban Fairy Tales Creator: Francis Bonnet Premise: A large cast of familiar fairy tale characters live in a modern suburban community, and some of them attend high school together. Characters: Pinocchio Frog Prince/Prince Charming 1 Prince Charming 2 Rapunzel Red Riding Hood Three Little Pigs Goldilocks Humpty Dumpty Rumpelstiltskin Big Bad Wolf Mr. Gepeto Gingerbread Man Cheshire Cat Pied Piper Mrs. Hagatha Bo Peep The Lost Sheep Santa Claus And more... Notes: Francis Bonnet graduated from the Fashion Institute of Technology in 2001 with a degree in illustration. From 2003-2005 he published the strip Crunchy, about a crazy turtle, on Comics Sherpa. He ended that feature and launched Suburban Fairy Tales in 2005. He paused it from 2006-2008 in order to do Made To Malfunction, a strip about a robot. Suburban Fairy Tales resumed in 2008, and has appeared three times a week ever since (except for a very brief hiatus in 2013 during which he experimented with a short-lived strip called Insane Forest). In addition to running on Sherpa, Suburban Fairy Tales appears on francisbonnet.com and Facebook. Bonnet has self-published four Suburban Fairy Tales books, and sells and signs at various Comic Cons. Preparation: Read a curated sampling of strips from the past seven years here. To read the most recent five months of the strip, begin here. Read the complete 2008-2015 Sherpa run, from the beginning, here, or backwards from today, here. Tomorrow's Review: Shena Wolf, UU's Acquisitions Editor -- David Stanford, aide de sherpa Continue reading
Posted Nov 16, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
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Next week LAUGH TRACKS will present the second Sherpa Review, in which GoComics editors take a close look at Francis Bonnet's Suburban Fairy Tales. The review will run in four parts, beginning on Monday. See you then! Continue reading
Posted Nov 13, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. Bushy Tales 11-11-14 Lili and Derek 11-11-14 Promises Promises 11-11-14 A.P..E. (anmal puns 4 every 1) 11-12-14 Boogerbrain 11-12-14 Girth 11-12-14 Smith 11-12-14 11-12-14 Buns 11-13-14 Mort's Island 11-13-14 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted Nov 13, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. 11-7-14 Don't Pick the Flowers 11-7-14 Spectickles 11-8-14 Stanko & Tibor 11-9-14 11-9-14 And now... 11-10-14 11-10-14 Cleo and Company 11-10-14 Green Pieces 11-10-14 Ron Warren 11-10-14 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted Nov 10, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. Girth 11-4-14 11-4-14 Mustard and Boloney 11-5-14 Rogue Symmetry 11-5-14 11-6-14 Ron Warren 11-6-14 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted Nov 6, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
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Ah, what a nice double-find -- two great videos about Lalo Alcaraz, a unique cartoonist whose strip LA CUCARACHA appears on GoComics (here -- this one is a Day of the Dead strip), as do his editorial cartoons, which are here. Lalo on his editorial cartoons: "I'm not really trying to convert anybody. I'm not trying to make friends, you know. I'm punching back." Searching for an embeddable version of that Times video led me right to this TEDxSoCal talk: "A Cartoonist's Guide to Life," which does indeed include a 13-point list: "#7: Coffee is your best friend. Alcohol does not help you draw any faster. It just makes your work seem funny -- to just you." "#11: Above all work hard. Work hard like a hard-working American. And if you want to work even harder than that, work like an immigrant." He's a busy and incredibly productive guy, with a web site that's packed with all kinds of stuff -- including his posters, like this one: Viva Alcaraz! Continue reading
Posted Nov 3, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. Alison Ward 10-31-14 10-31-14 Kartoons by Kline 10-31-14 Smith 10-31-14 Snow Sez... 10-31-14 Speckticles 11-1-14 Green Pieces 11-1-14 Frank Blunt 11-2-14 Snow Sez... 11-3-14 I'm Telling Mom 11-3-14 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted Nov 3, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
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Browsing my favorite bookstore this morning I was happy to come across a big new beautiful collection of Don Martin's work. Martin was a key part of the mystique and delight of Mad Magazine for me as a kid, and he is the only cartoonist who I actually tried to imitate, though briefly. It didn't bring me the glory my friend Melvin Jung got for drawing perfect Snoopys for anybody who asked, but I enjoyed penciling hairs sticking out of long scrawny Martiny legs. He was billed as Mad's Maddest Artist, and reading through this new full-color book made me realize how many times I must have read my Don Martin mass market paperbacks, as so many of his drawings are deeply and precisely burned into my memory -- like this dentist drill image. Characters like Fester Bestertester and Karbunkle and Fonebone were familiar friends. I see that his widow Norma Martin has a good website going here, and there's a terrific shot of Martin's studio -- accompanying a Martin-interviews-Martin piece -- here. It alludes to his struggles with Mad publisher William Gaines over copyright issues. While looking around for biographical information and images I was delighted to find out that shortly before his work first appeared in Mad in 1956, Martin did album covers for the Prestige label, for such artists as Art Farmer, Sonny Stitt, Bud Powell, J.J. Johnson, Stan Getz -- and Miles Davis. He did the cover of Miles Davis and Horns. Which makes Martin even cooler than I already thought he was... Crazy. Continue reading
Posted Oct 30, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. Bushy Tales 10-28-14 10-28-14 10-28-14 10-28-14 Jack Radio Comics 10-29-14 10-29-14 Peanizles 10-29-14 Regular Creatures 10-29-14 Abbott's "Specticles" 10-30-14 The Boobiehatch 10-30-14 ' A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted Oct 30, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
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Here at GoComics we've been working hard for years to help create the online future for comics. And yet cartoons on pieces of paper remain one of life's great pleasure for me -- not only in the daily newspaper, in books, and in The New Yorker, but in the monthly comics and humor newspaper Funny Times. For almost 30 years, a small team of people have spent their time surveying the riches of the cartoon universe and plucking what they like in order to fill out this monthly toon-trove, which is actually printed on newsprint and arrives in the mailbox for a modest fee. Once indoors, an issue of Funny Times can migrate around the house for weeks, folded to a different page every time you see it, and increasingly stained by coffee-cup rings. An issue arrived in my mailbox today, and by my count has about 100 comics and cartoons (some by well-known people, others not) and about a dozen humorous essays (same deal -- Dave Barry, Andy Borowitz, and people whose names I don't recognize). Regular text features include News of the Weird, Curmudgeon quotes, and the always-amazing Harper's Index. The cartoons are from all over the place -- lots of GoComics creators are in there, as are Sherpa creators, alt-indy-undergrounders, New Yorker folk, and there are people you'll see here first and get to know elsewhere later. When I saw the new issue and felt the anticipation of enjoyment, I realized I should pass along word for any toonfolk who may not have heard of it yet. Check out the site here. Continue reading
Posted Oct 27, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. Alison Ward 10-24-14 10-24-14 Just Posted 10-24-14 Kim The Grim Elf 10-25-14 The Boobiehatch 10-25-14 10-26-14 Frank & Steinway 10-27-14 Magic Coffee Hair 10-27-14 Mort's Island 10-27-14 10-27-14 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted Oct 27, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. A Boots & Pup Comic 10-21-14 Buns 10-21-14 10-21-14 Promises Promises 10-21-14 The Beauforts 10-21-14 Alison Ward 10-22-14 10-22-14 10-22-14 10-22-14 10-22-14 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted Oct 23, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. 10-17-14 S.O.D. 10-17-14 Buns 10-18-14 10-19-14 Green Pieces 10-19-14 10-19-14 Alison Ward 10-20-14 And now... 10-20-14 Batch Rejection 10-20-14 Frank & Steinway 10-20-14 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted Oct 20, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
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There's a nice long Chris Ware profile/interview from The Guardian here, in which Ware talks about his new book, Building Stories. It is about one unnamed woman, and consists of 14 stories which can be read in any order. From the article: "On stage he described the cartoon as a 'working-class art form' and an 'art of the people.' He expanded on this afterwards; beginning with a short-hand history of early comics from Rodolphe Töpffer to Richard Felton Outcault, he warmed to his theme. 'In America, it really exploded in the 1920s, in Chicago specifically, with the artists on the Chicago Tribune doing what were essentially serial stories that predated what would happen with radio and TV. And they were all about regular people. Take Gasoline Alley –- that strip suddenly became about real life, it had a continuing narrative and a warmth. They knew the readers of the newspaper were regular people who didn't want to be talked down to. That's appealing to me: it seems like the best possible America, the point at which the ideals coalesce into a popular art form that could actually be great." Continue reading
Posted Oct 16, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. Candace 'n' Company 10-14-14 10-14-14 Elmo 10-14-14 10-14-14 10-14-14 10-14-14 Cleo and Company 10-15-14 Girth 10-15-14 Smith 10-15-14 Snow Sez... 10-15-14 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted Oct 16, 2014 at Laugh Tracks
This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator. We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback. Cleo and Company 10-10-14 County Line 10-10-14 10-10-14 Regular Creatures 10-10-14 Snow Sez... 10-10-14 10-10-14 10-10-14 10-12-14 A Boots & Pup Comic 10-13-14 Onion & Pea 10-13-14 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. Continue reading
Posted Oct 13, 2014 at Laugh Tracks