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Drew Boyd
Cincinnati
Co-author of Inside the Box: A Proven System of Creativity for Breakthrough Results. Innovation practitioner, professor, blogger, and speaker.
Interests: speaking, writing, teaching, ice hockey, innovating, playing blues guitar, building guitars, fishing
Recent Activity
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At some point as an innovation leader, you and your team will launch new innovations into the market place. Those could be new products and services, it could be a new advertising campaign, or simply displaying your products at a trade show. These initiatives are an important test of your leadership. So here are my tips - the DO’s and DON’Ts for launching new initiatives. Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Innovation in Practice
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You are one of the few people who have encouraged me to admit that I want to do great things in my life. I did not always have the courage to proclaim this. When I say it aloud, it fills me with energy. It makes me hungry to acquire knowledge, inspire breakthrough, and create impact. Thanks to you, I feel that I am on my way. Continue reading
Posted Jun 13, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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Diversity is a driver of creativity. Diverse teams see new possibilities, they hold each other accountable to bring their best thinking. And it helps you boost your creativity at work. Continue reading
Posted Jun 6, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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What products or services have you purchased that are your absolute favorites? Can think of a few? My bet is that you can think of a few because those products did everything and more than what you expected. Your satisfaction after consuming those products is very high. That’s one reason why the last step of the buying process, the post-purchase phase, may be the most important in the study of consumer behavior. Let’s learn more reasons why and what you as the innovator can do about it. Continue reading
Posted May 30, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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For most companies, the top marketer, usually called the chief marketing officer, is part of the senior leadership team and sits on the executive committee or management board. In other words, marketing has a “seat at the table.” Continue reading
Posted May 23, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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Have you ever heard the expression, "Riding on the Coattails of Others?" What it means is - achieving success by associating with other people or groups. In sales and marketing, it’s another great way to create opportunities and improve your sales revenue. Let’s look at how. Continue reading
Posted May 16, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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Adjacent markets are a great source of sales growth if you can spot them and if you have the right skills to go after them. Let’s look at how you do it. Continue reading
Posted May 9, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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Look at any industry, in any market, and you’ll find the same strategy playing out everywhere. Companies compete with one another in a mindless race to the bottom, matching products and services feature for feature, competing primarily on price. This commoditizes markets and drives down prices and margins. But ultimately, no one wins—not even the consumer--as quality, service and differentiation suffer. We call this senseless strategy “Attrition Competition”, and it is derived from prevailing military strategy, which seeks to overwhelm competitors. Continue reading
Posted May 2, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the Zika virus is a global emergency. To fight it, humans have to find a way to kill the Aedes Aegypti mosquito. Two marketing agencies in Brazil have designed a novel way to do just that. They call it The Mosquito Killer Billboard. It's a great example of the Task Unification Technique, one of five in the innovation method called Systematic Inventive Thinking. Here's how their innovation works: Continue reading
Posted Apr 27, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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Are You an Innovator? Take the Quiz. Continue reading
Posted Apr 18, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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The division technique works by dividing a product or its components functionally or physically and then rearranging them back into the product. Division is a powerful technique because it forces you to break fixedness, especially structural fixedness. Division forces you to create configurations by rearranging components in ways you were not likely to have done on with on your own. Continue reading
Posted Apr 11, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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You've heard that old adage. Don't judge a book by its cover. The same holds true in creativity. We want to resist the temptation of judging ideas depending on where it came from. Yet, its very difficult for us to do this. If we like the person, we tend to like their idea. And if we don't like that person, well, let's just say we might see a few more flaws than we might have otherwise. Continue reading
Posted Apr 7, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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A very simple technique is, instead of working as a large group, imagine breaking the group down into smaller teams, pairs, or groups of three. Why does this work? Working in pairs has many advantages. When you work with another person, you give that person your undivided attention. You feel a certain accountability to that other person to do your fair share of the thinking. Continue reading
Posted Mar 28, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
I love umbrellas and the many versions that demonstrate the five patterns of Systematic Inventive Thinking. Here's a new one that demonstrates the Task Unification pattern. Task Unification is defined as: assigning an additional task to an existing resource. That resource should be in the immediate vicinity of the problem, or what we call The Closed World. In essence, it's taking something that is already around you and giving an additional job. Continue reading
Posted Mar 21, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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Task Unification is defined as: assigning an additional task to an existing resource. That resource should be in the immediate vicinity of the problem, or what we call The Closed World. In essence, it's taking something that is already around you and giving an additional job. Continue reading
Posted Mar 14, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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One of my favorites is the Absurd Alternative Tool. It works by offering exaggerated alternatives to using the product or service to highlight the benefit. But the key is to make the alternative truly absurd. Otherwise viewers can get confused. Continue reading
Posted Mar 7, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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Innovation is often associated with triumphant lone inventors. The likes of Thomas Edison, Louis Pasteur or Bill Gates are the central characters in this narrative. But all innovators spring out of a specific context. The environments that foster their individual and collective success are very often ‘innovation clusters’: ecosystems that stimulate and nurture the best ideas and attract the brightest talents. Continue reading
Posted Feb 29, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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Task Unification is defined as: assigning an additional task to an existing resource. That resource should be in the immediate vicinity of the problem, or what we call The Closed World. In essence, it's taking something that is already around you and giving an additional job. Continue reading
Posted Feb 22, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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Today is Valentine's Day, and to celebrate, here are ten creative ways to show how much you love your partner. I generated some of these for a TV interview yesterday on FOX19-WXIX morning news is Cincinnati. They wanted me to share how to use S.I.T. to be more creative on this special day. So here is my extended list: Continue reading
Posted Feb 14, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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You've heard that old adage. Don't judge a book by its cover. The same holds true in creativity. We want to resist the temptation of judging ideas depending on where it came from. Yet, its very difficult for us to do this. If we like the person, we tend to like their idea. And if we don't like that person, well, let's just say we might see a few more flaws than we might have otherwise. Now you and your colleagues might not even be aware that you're doing this. And what this means for you in practice is that you have to find a way to strip ideas of their identity. Continue reading
Posted Feb 8, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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A clever way to find new growth is to change your market category or create a new one. When you create or change your category, you’re redefining the boundaries of your market space, and that opens your eyes to new targets of opportunity. Let’s look at how to do it. One way to do this is by zooming up from your current category. That means you dial the category definition up a bit to create a bigger market space. Continue reading
Posted Feb 1, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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People who believe that the wheel is the greatest invention ever assume two things: That it was wholly new when it was invented, and that is was so wonderful that people adopted it immediately. Historically, neither is true. Continue reading
Posted Jan 25, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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The availability heuristic is a mental shortcut that occurs when people make judgments about the probability of events by how easy it is to think of examples. The availability heuristic operates on the notion that, "if you can think of it, it must be important." Continue reading
Posted Jan 18, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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Imagine your marketing team comes up with an idea for a great new product. You absolutely love it. But when you start shopping the idea around the building, you get some very strange looks from people. People are resisting the idea, and you and your team are getting frustrated. Resistance to innovation is a natural phenomena in companies, and it can become a huge challenge unless you manage it correctly. Continue reading
Posted Jan 4, 2016 at Innovation in Practice
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As a teacher of creativity, I agree that persistence is an important success factor when producing new ideas. As the researchers point out, when creative challenges start to feel difficult, most people lower their expectations about the performance benefits of perseverance, and consequently, underestimate their own ability to generate ideas. But other factors can boost...or inhibit innovation...motivation, hope, and anxiety (yes, you read it correctly - anxiety). Continue reading
Posted Dec 28, 2015 at Innovation in Practice