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Drew Boyd
Cincinnati
Co-author of Inside the Box: A Proven System of Creativity for Breakthrough Results. Innovation practitioner, professor, blogger, and speaker.
Interests: speaking, writing, teaching, ice hockey, innovating, playing blues guitar, building guitars, fishing
Recent Activity
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Are online reviews going extinct? From Yelp to Amazon, reviews these days are good for just one thing: Seeing what others think of a product, service, or business. But are reviews really helpful? Could they be an outmoded one-size-fits-all solution in a world where a user's interests are increasingly customized and niche-specific? Are they going the way of the dinosaurs? Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at Innovation in Practice
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Creativity is considered by many to be a rare, elusive gift only musicians or bohemian New York artists possess. And to be sure, some people are born with more than an average amount of it. But everyone has the capacity to be creative. Many of us simply don’t call on it very often. When you intentionally call on that capacity inside, really call for it, you’ll realize it can be summoned. Continue reading
Posted Nov 10, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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Many "wearable tech" devices measure the calories you burn in a day. But weight watchers know that's only half the equation. You also need an accurate count of calories consumed. Now a new device will do just that. It's called Vessyl, a cup that will not only identify and track what you drink and how much of it, but also sense the liquid type. It will transform how we consume every ounce of liquid throughout the day. Continue reading
Posted Nov 2, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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Innovation is an essential ingredient to the growth and success of China's economy. The use of methods such as Systematic Inventive Thinking will accelerate that growth. But where should China focus its innovation efforts? Professors George Yip and Bruce McKern make the case that China should focus on the following: Continue reading
Posted Oct 27, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
The only thing worse than having too many emails is getting very long ones. When I open an email and see a long-winded message followed by a chain of other emails that have to be read as well, I dread it. After all, brevity is a virtue, and I value those emails that are short and efficient. Now there's a new app that helps manage the problem, and it is a great example of the Subtraction Technique, one of five in the innovation method, Systematic Inventive Thinking. It's called "MailTime." MailTime re-formats and summarizes your mails into a messaging conversation view. It redesigns the way you assign tasks helps you to track information easier. Continue reading
Posted Oct 20, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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Listen to the Entrepreneur’s Library: Episode 5 - "Inside The Box" by Drew Boyd. Continue reading
Posted Oct 13, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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It's like a chair that isn't there, but magically appears whenever you need it. It's called the Chairless Chair and you wear it on your legs like an exoskeleton: when it's not activated, you can walk normally or even run. And then, at the touch of a button, it locks into place and you can sit down on it. Like a chair that is now there. It's a perfect example of the Subtraction Technique, one of five in the innovation method, Systematic Inventive Thinking (SIT). It's also a great example of Ideality, a property of innovation solutions that appear only when the problem appears. Continue reading
Posted Oct 5, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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Can creativity be taught? Here are insights from Professors Jacob Goldenberg, Rom Shrift and others on this seemingly elusive topic (from Knowledge@Wharton, August 27, 2014): Continue reading
Reblogged Sep 29, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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The course will help you master the tools necessary to generate new ideas and quickly transform those concepts into a viable pipeline of new products and services. Participants will learn the highly effective method of idea generation called Systematic Inventive Thinking used by many global firms across a wide variety of industries. They will also learn a suite of design thinking tools to take new concepts and put “life” into them. Generating ideas is not enough. Design thinking takes new ideas and sculpts them into market-winning products and services. Participants will learn the mechanics of each S.I.T. tool, and practice the use of each on a real product or service. Additionally, they will learn from a panel of seasoned practitioners and experts in the fields of innovation, new product development, and venture start-up. Continue reading
Posted Sep 22, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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Innovation is anything that is new, useful, and surprising. "Surprising" means that the idea makes you slap your forehead and say, "Gee, why didn't I think of that?" Here's a great example. Researchers at the MIT Media Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley have developed a new display technology that automatically corrects for vision defects — no glasses (or contact lenses) required. It is a classic and clever example of the Divison Technique, one of the five techniques in Systematic Inventive Thinking. Continue reading
Posted Sep 15, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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Just as there are five techniques of systematic innovation, there are six universal principles of persuasion. These principles help people know when it's appropriate to say 'yes' to a request. For innovators, creating great ideas is the first imperative. But then the hard part starts - how to align and convice others of the value of your idea. Take a look at this Infographic and YouTube video that explain the Six Universal Principles of Persuasion. Continue reading
Posted Sep 8, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
I'm pleased to announce the release of my latest course, Marketing Fundamentals, at Lynda.com. "Whether you're rebuilding your marketing program from the ground up or leading the first campaign of your career, this course will help you lay the foundation... Continue reading
Posted Sep 1, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
Can you imagine flying in a plane without windows? A design team from Technicon Design in Paris created an interior that displays 360-degree views that are simulated on internal screens from external cameras that capture the surrounding environment in real time. The images displayed in the interior cabin—including the walls and even the ceiling—give passengers the feeling of flying through the air in an invisible vessel. Continue reading
Posted Aug 25, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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Success in life depends not only on what you accomplish, but also how you overcome everyday challenges. This includes the challenges many college students face during back to school season. Don’t call mom and dad yet: Here are five easy problem-solving tips you can apply to just about any challenge, big or small. Continue reading
Posted Aug 18, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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People need time to innovate, but corporations tend to "tax" employees with time-wasting bureacracy. As reported in The Economist, clutter is taking a toll on both morale and productivity. "Teresa Amabile of Harvard Business School studied the daily routines of more than 230 people who work on projects that require creativity. As might have been expected, she found that their ability to think creatively fell markedly if their working days were punctuated with meetings. They did far better if left to focus on their projects without interruption for a large chunk of the day, and had to collaborate with no more than one colleague." Continue reading
Posted Aug 11, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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When describing the SIT method, I sometimes say it’s like using the voice of the product. That’s because SIT is based on patterns that are embedded into the products and services you see around you. If products could talk to you, they would describe the five patterns of SIT. But there’s another important voice in business innovation: the voice of the customer. After all, that’s why you do innovation - to create new value, directly or indirectly, for your customers. A good innovator understands their needs and wants. In this video, I’ll show you four different ways to gain new insights from your customers. Continue reading
Posted Aug 4, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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Philips North America announced the launch of the second annual Philips Innovation Fellows competition, in conjunction with the release of its 2014 North America Innovation Report. According to the report, nearly two-thirds of North Americans consider themselves innovators, of which a majority (72 percent) believe they are sitting on an idea for “the next big thing,” and just need money and ‘know how’ to develop it. The Philips Innovation Fellows Competition awards mentoring and $100,000 in cash prizes to inspire would-be entrepreneurs to bring their ideas to life by entering the competition. Continue reading
Posted Jul 28, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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Creative marketers use a clever little tool called fusion. Fusion links a product to a message in a creative way that communicates the value inherent in the product. Fusion creates a visual connection between the product and a symbol representing the value. When a customer sees that connection, they instantly understand the message and appreciate the value delivered by the product in a more powerful and subtle way. Continue reading
Posted Jul 21, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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This innovation is a classic example of the multiplication technique. The Multiplication Technique is defined as copying an element already existing in the product or service but changing it in some counterintuitive way. Continue reading
Posted Jul 14, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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You can use an innovation method like SIT on your own. But there are times when you want to use it in a group with your colleagues. After all, innovation is a team sport. Innovating in groups lets you harness the brainpower of others. Here are some tips and techniques to get the most out of your group ideation session. Continue reading
Posted Jul 7, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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The famous inventor, Thomas Edison, lived in a beautiful home. But something was unusual about the gate that led into his house. His visitors had to push the gate very hard to open it, and then again very hard to close it. It seemed odd that such a successful inventor like Thomas Edison wouldn’t fix his gate. Rumor has it that Thomas had attached a pump to his gate so that every time someone opened or closed it, they were pumping fresh water into the plumbing system of the house. This is a great example of the innovation technique called Task Unification. Task Unification is defined as the assignment of additional tasks to an existing resource. That resource can be a component of a product or service. Or it can be something in the immediate vicinity of the product or service. Continue reading
Posted Jun 30, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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One of the most important principles in the SIT Method is the Closed World principle. It states that there is an inverse relationship between the distance from the problem and the creativity of the solution. The farther away you have to go to find a solution, the less creative it will be. So it’s important where you set the boundaries of the Closed World as you apply the SIT Method. Continue reading
Posted Jun 23, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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One way to develop your expertise in the SIT techniques is with pattern spotting. A key premise of SIT is that for thousands of years, innovators have used patterns in their inventions, usually without even realizing it. Those patterns are now embedded into the products and services you see around you, almost like the DNA of a product. You want to develop your ability to see these patterns as a way to improve your use of them. Continue reading
Posted Jun 16, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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Just released! Lean the entire SIT Method on Lynda.com. Continue reading
Posted Jun 9, 2014 at Innovation in Practice
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The SIT method is great for creating exciting new products and services. But you can also apply these techniques to digital assets. For example, let’s apply the Attribute Dependency technique to a website. You start by listing the internal and external attributes of the site. You list the attributes, and you create a two dimensional matrix that pairs internal attributes to other internal and external attributes. Continue reading
Posted Jun 9, 2014 at Innovation in Practice