This is Drew Boyd's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Drew Boyd's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Drew Boyd
Co-author of Inside the Box: A Proven System of Creativity for Breakthrough Results. Innovation practitioner, professor, blogger, and speaker.
Interests: speaking, writing, teaching, ice hockey, innovating, playing blues guitar, building guitars, fishing
Recent Activity
How does a company cope with change? It’s a question that looms large for many executives who are struggling to keep up with the breakneck pace of business. Those who fail to answer it may face loss of market share, or, in extreme cases, financial ruin. All too often, companies respond to these pressures by fixating on the future, not realizing that their greatest strength could be hidden in their past. Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at Innovation in Practice
The Task Unification Technique is great because it generates novel ideas that tend to be novel and resourceful. Task Unification is defined as: assigning an additional task to an existing resource. That resource should be in the immediate vicinity of the problem, or what we call The Closed World. In essence, it's taking something that is already around you and giving an additional job. Here are two great examples, one about a very young person and the other about a new and nifty device for old people. Continue reading
Posted Sep 28, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
When you try on a new piece of clothing, like a shirt or a new jacket, what do you see when you look in the mirror? If you’re like most consumers, you’re not looking at the clothing. Rather, you’re looking at yourself and thinking about how that new clothing fits the image of the person you are or want to become. Continue reading
Posted Sep 21, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
On any given day, it’s estimated that 1 in 25 hospital patients in the U.S. has at least one healthcare-associated infection (HAI), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That includes pneumonia; gastrointestinal illness; or infections of the urinary tract, bloodstream or surgical site. Sadly, despite enormous resources aimed at preventing the problem, HAIs continue to result in infection and even death. Moreover, HAIs cost the U.S. healthcare system an estimated $35 billion annually, making it one of the biggest challenges facing hospital chief executive officers. Clearly, a new way of thinking about HAIs is needed. Continue reading
Posted Sep 14, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Taylor Mallory Holland at Content Standard wrote this insightful article how tight deadlines can have both a positive and a negative affect on creativity. Continue reading
Posted Sep 8, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
So what happened here? You were guilty of a bias that we all have called The Hindsight Bias. Hindsight bias, also known as the “knew-it-all-along effect”, is the inclination to see events that have already occurred as being more predictable than they were before they took place. Hindsight bias causes you to view events as more predictable than they really are. After an event, people often believe that they knew the outcome of the event before it actually happened. Continue reading
Posted Aug 31, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Think about the last time you bought a car or perhaps a computer. Now, think about the next time you’ll buy one of those items. Are you going to do it exactly the same way as before? If you’re like most consumers, the answer is probably not. That’s because you learned some things from the first experience that will improve your purchasing behavior on the next experience. That's especially true with new, innovative products. Continue reading
Posted Aug 24, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Engineering firm B/E Aerospace has filed a patent for a “legroom adjustable” seat design that allows flight attendants to move a seat forward or back depending on the size of a passenger, reports the Telegraph. Continue reading
Posted Aug 17, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
I invite you to join the upcoming Innovation Suite in San Francisco, November 16-18, 2015. Continue reading
Posted Aug 11, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
I want you to imagine that you’ve been working on a string of projects, and they’ve all gone very well. You’re talented, hardworking, and ambitious, and you’re on a roll. Then, your next assignment comes along. It’s a big challenge like the ones before. You’ve got a tight deadline, a limited budget, and lots of pressure to make it a big success. Then, something bad happens. You were faced with a critical decision. You knew ahead of time that you didn’t have all the information, but you made a decision anyway...and it was dead wrong. So what happened? Well, you may have been guilty of a cognitive bias called overconfidence. Continue reading
Posted Aug 3, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Innovation is all about creating products and services that make your company more competitive in the marketplace. Those actions typically include generating ideas, creating prototypes, building the business case, and getting alignment to launch. Marketers must develop a strategy to know where to focus their resources. Continue reading
Posted Jul 27, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
In Innovating Out of Crisis, How Fujifilm Survived (and Thrived) As Its Core Business Was Vanishing, published by Stone Bridge Press, Berkeley, California, Shigetaka Komori, FUJIFILM Holdings Corporation Chairman and CEO, recounts how he was inspired to lead Fujifilm’s journey from the brink of extinction to its current path of prosperity and growth – and a new direction. Continue reading
Posted Jul 20, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Do you remember a time when you were just about to buy something, but at the last minute, you stopped and said, “No, I don’t think I’ll buy this.” So what stopped you? It was most likely because you were worried about something. There was too much risk around the purchase, so you walked away. Guess what? You’re just like every other consumer out there. Being a consumer is risky business. As an innovator, you have to understand the risks and uncertainties faced by your customers, and figure out ways to lower that risk. The lower the risk to consumers, the more likely they are to buy the product and less likely they are to complain about it afterwards. Continue reading
Posted Jul 6, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Nielson released its 2015 BREAKTHROUGH INNOVATION REPORT that features best practices from winning brands – with 7 specific case studies from brands like Pepsico, Kraft, MillerCoors, Kellogg’s, Nestle Purina, Atkins and L’Oreal Paris. The report is based on a two year study examining over 3000 products that were launched to consumers in the US. It debunks conventional wisdom that new product success is random. Instead, it shows that success in new product innovation is repeatable and scalable when the science of innovation is applied. Continue reading
Posted Jun 29, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Learn innovation, group creativity, and much more at, a division of LinkedIn. Check out these courses. Continue reading
Posted Jun 22, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
One way to make adaptations with Attribute Dependency is to change the type of dependency. There are three ways to do it: passive, active and automatic. Think of these as what has to happen within the product or service for the dependency to take place. Let’s look at each type. Continue reading
Posted Jun 15, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
When describing the SIT method, I sometimes say it’s like using the voice of the product. That’s because SIT is based on patterns that are embedded into the products and services you see around you. If products could talk to you, they would describe the five patterns of SIT. But there’s another important voice in business innovation: the voice of the customer. After all, that’s why you do innovation - to create new value, directly or indirectly, for your customers. A good innovator understands their needs and wants. Continue reading
Posted Jun 8, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
The Innovate! Inside the Box app for iPad facilitates the use of Systematic Inventive Thinking. It explains each of the five techniques and allows users to generate creative ideas and innovations on demand. Continue reading
Posted Jun 1, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
It's hard for me not to play favorites when it comes to the five creativity techniques of the SIT method. After all, they're just like children - each is unique with their own potential and personality. But when it comes to versatility, the one that may do it the best is Task Unification. It tends to produce ideas that are both clever and resourceful, often harnessing resources in the immediate vicinity of the problem in a unique. These ideas tend to make you slap your forehead and say, "Gee, why didn't I think of that?" Continue reading
Posted May 25, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Most people think the way you create an idea is to start with a well-formed problem and then brainstorm a solution to it. What if you turned that around 180 degrees? It sounds counter-intuitive, but you really can innovate by starting with the solution and then work backwards to the problem. Continue reading
Posted May 19, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Jacob Goldenberg, in his book, "Cracking the Ad Code," describes eight patterns that are embedded in most innovative, award- winning commercials. Continue reading
Posted May 11, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
SIT is a collection of five techniques and a set of principles to help generate quality ideas on demand. One of the challenges you can have is deciding which technique to use. So here are some rules of thumb to get you started. Continue reading
Posted May 6, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Think about how often you push buttons during the normal course of a day; at home, in our car, and elsewhere - elevators, crosswalks, and so on. Did you ever stop to wonder how many of those buttons you push don't actually work? It's called a placebo button - it seems to have functionality, but actually has no effect when pressed. Continue reading
Posted Apr 20, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Who would use a cashless ATM (Automated Teller Machine)? It seems like a ridiculous idea, because that's the whole point of using an ATM - getting cash. That will all change with the RTM (Retail-Teller-Machine). It works just like an ATM. Instead of dispensing cash, the RTM prints a secure ticket that is exchanged for cash. RTMs are located inside any store and provide a full range of Banking services. Continue reading
Posted Apr 13, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
One way you can use the Task Unification Technique is to make an internal component take on the function of an external component in a Closed World. In effect, the internal component “steals” the external component’s function. Continue reading
Posted Apr 6, 2015 at Innovation in Practice