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Drew Boyd
Co-author of Inside the Box: A Proven System of Creativity for Breakthrough Results. Innovation practitioner, professor, blogger, and speaker.
Interests: speaking, writing, teaching, ice hockey, innovating, playing blues guitar, building guitars, fishing
Recent Activity
Confirmation bias is the tendency for people to only seek out information that conforms to their pre-existing viewpoints, and subsequently ignore information that goes against them. You overweight the good news, and underweight the bad news. Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at Innovation in Practice
The shifting map of global innovation In the 2015 Global Innovation 1000 study, Strategy&, PwC's strategy consulting group, provides new insights into the ways corporate innovation spending—which totaled $680 billion last year—has been changing in recent years, and examines the implications both for the future course of global economies and for corporate performance. How and where innovation is performed matters: As Harvard Business School professor Michael Porter, author of classic texts on corporate strategy and the competitive advantage of nations, has noted, “Innovation is the central issue in economic prosperity.” Continue reading
Posted Nov 16, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
A great source of new sales growth is with your existing loyal customers. After all, they already understand the category, they trust your brand, and you have an existing relationship - meaning you’ve been given permission to interact with them. When I say loyal customer, I mean one that buys 100% of the product or service from you and no one else like your main competitors. Continue reading
Posted Nov 9, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
If you want to shift your mindset in order to aid your innovative thinking, simply act in accordance with the Big Five, and you will be surprised how much faster and easier it will be for you to maximize the innovative thinking techniques and tools you are utilizing. By practicing, you are exercising your brain networks involved in innovative thinking and strengthening the neural connections that matter. Build a strong foundation for your innovative thinking and relish the results. Continue reading
Posted Nov 2, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
When using the Attribute Dependency technique, you’ll reach a point in the function follows form process where it’s time to make adaptations to your concept. That’s where you try to improve the concept and put more definition around it. Continue reading
Posted Oct 26, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Imagine you’re driving down the highway, and you notice a flag waving in the distance. But something’s not right. The flag is upside down. You’d notice it right away because it’s not in its usual position that you have seen hundreds of times before. Continue reading
Posted Oct 19, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
The Product Development and Management Association (PDMA), the premier global advocate for product development and management professionals, announced today that it has awarded the 2015 Outstanding Corporate Innovator (OCI) Award to BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) (NYSE: BDX). Continue reading
Posted Oct 12, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
How does a company cope with change? It’s a question that looms large for many executives who are struggling to keep up with the breakneck pace of business. Those who fail to answer it may face loss of market share, or, in extreme cases, financial ruin. All too often, companies respond to these pressures by fixating on the future, not realizing that their greatest strength could be hidden in their past. Continue reading
Posted Oct 5, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
The Task Unification Technique is great because it generates novel ideas that tend to be novel and resourceful. Task Unification is defined as: assigning an additional task to an existing resource. That resource should be in the immediate vicinity of the problem, or what we call The Closed World. In essence, it's taking something that is already around you and giving an additional job. Here are two great examples, one about a very young person and the other about a new and nifty device for old people. Continue reading
Posted Sep 28, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
When you try on a new piece of clothing, like a shirt or a new jacket, what do you see when you look in the mirror? If you’re like most consumers, you’re not looking at the clothing. Rather, you’re looking at yourself and thinking about how that new clothing fits the image of the person you are or want to become. Continue reading
Posted Sep 21, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
On any given day, it’s estimated that 1 in 25 hospital patients in the U.S. has at least one healthcare-associated infection (HAI), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That includes pneumonia; gastrointestinal illness; or infections of the urinary tract, bloodstream or surgical site. Sadly, despite enormous resources aimed at preventing the problem, HAIs continue to result in infection and even death. Moreover, HAIs cost the U.S. healthcare system an estimated $35 billion annually, making it one of the biggest challenges facing hospital chief executive officers. Clearly, a new way of thinking about HAIs is needed. Continue reading
Posted Sep 14, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Taylor Mallory Holland at Content Standard wrote this insightful article how tight deadlines can have both a positive and a negative affect on creativity. Continue reading
Posted Sep 8, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
So what happened here? You were guilty of a bias that we all have called The Hindsight Bias. Hindsight bias, also known as the “knew-it-all-along effect”, is the inclination to see events that have already occurred as being more predictable than they were before they took place. Hindsight bias causes you to view events as more predictable than they really are. After an event, people often believe that they knew the outcome of the event before it actually happened. Continue reading
Posted Aug 31, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Think about the last time you bought a car or perhaps a computer. Now, think about the next time you’ll buy one of those items. Are you going to do it exactly the same way as before? If you’re like most consumers, the answer is probably not. That’s because you learned some things from the first experience that will improve your purchasing behavior on the next experience. That's especially true with new, innovative products. Continue reading
Posted Aug 24, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Engineering firm B/E Aerospace has filed a patent for a “legroom adjustable” seat design that allows flight attendants to move a seat forward or back depending on the size of a passenger, reports the Telegraph. Continue reading
Posted Aug 17, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
I invite you to join the upcoming Innovation Suite in San Francisco, November 16-18, 2015. Continue reading
Posted Aug 11, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
I want you to imagine that you’ve been working on a string of projects, and they’ve all gone very well. You’re talented, hardworking, and ambitious, and you’re on a roll. Then, your next assignment comes along. It’s a big challenge like the ones before. You’ve got a tight deadline, a limited budget, and lots of pressure to make it a big success. Then, something bad happens. You were faced with a critical decision. You knew ahead of time that you didn’t have all the information, but you made a decision anyway...and it was dead wrong. So what happened? Well, you may have been guilty of a cognitive bias called overconfidence. Continue reading
Posted Aug 3, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Innovation is all about creating products and services that make your company more competitive in the marketplace. Those actions typically include generating ideas, creating prototypes, building the business case, and getting alignment to launch. Marketers must develop a strategy to know where to focus their resources. Continue reading
Posted Jul 27, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
In Innovating Out of Crisis, How Fujifilm Survived (and Thrived) As Its Core Business Was Vanishing, published by Stone Bridge Press, Berkeley, California, Shigetaka Komori, FUJIFILM Holdings Corporation Chairman and CEO, recounts how he was inspired to lead Fujifilm’s journey from the brink of extinction to its current path of prosperity and growth – and a new direction. Continue reading
Posted Jul 20, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Do you remember a time when you were just about to buy something, but at the last minute, you stopped and said, “No, I don’t think I’ll buy this.” So what stopped you? It was most likely because you were worried about something. There was too much risk around the purchase, so you walked away. Guess what? You’re just like every other consumer out there. Being a consumer is risky business. As an innovator, you have to understand the risks and uncertainties faced by your customers, and figure out ways to lower that risk. The lower the risk to consumers, the more likely they are to buy the product and less likely they are to complain about it afterwards. Continue reading
Posted Jul 6, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Nielson released its 2015 BREAKTHROUGH INNOVATION REPORT that features best practices from winning brands – with 7 specific case studies from brands like Pepsico, Kraft, MillerCoors, Kellogg’s, Nestle Purina, Atkins and L’Oreal Paris. The report is based on a two year study examining over 3000 products that were launched to consumers in the US. It debunks conventional wisdom that new product success is random. Instead, it shows that success in new product innovation is repeatable and scalable when the science of innovation is applied. Continue reading
Posted Jun 29, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
Learn innovation, group creativity, and much more at, a division of LinkedIn. Check out these courses. Continue reading
Posted Jun 22, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
One way to make adaptations with Attribute Dependency is to change the type of dependency. There are three ways to do it: passive, active and automatic. Think of these as what has to happen within the product or service for the dependency to take place. Let’s look at each type. Continue reading
Posted Jun 15, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
When describing the SIT method, I sometimes say it’s like using the voice of the product. That’s because SIT is based on patterns that are embedded into the products and services you see around you. If products could talk to you, they would describe the five patterns of SIT. But there’s another important voice in business innovation: the voice of the customer. After all, that’s why you do innovation - to create new value, directly or indirectly, for your customers. A good innovator understands their needs and wants. Continue reading
Posted Jun 8, 2015 at Innovation in Practice
The Innovate! Inside the Box app for iPad facilitates the use of Systematic Inventive Thinking. It explains each of the five techniques and allows users to generate creative ideas and innovations on demand. Continue reading
Posted Jun 1, 2015 at Innovation in Practice