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dovegreyreader
Devon, U.K.
A Devonshire-based bookaholic, sock-knitting quilter who was a Community Nurse once upon a time.
Interests: reading, quilting, sock knitting, books, walking,
Recent Activity
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One of the things that beating the bounds around us here on a daily basis has made me increasingly aware of is the fact that our footprint now extends back over the last twenty-two years. We moved in on a... Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Hello Chums, Magnus in camouflage here... Shall we have a little sing-song first...how about The Happy Wanderer, and let's give it some wellie on the chorus... I love to go a-wandering, Along the mountain track, And as I go, I... Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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This is interesting reenstitcher. The Bernina Doctor wouldn't put mine in the boot in case it fell over. He strapped it into the back seat with the seat belt safely around...good advice about the needle being down. I will now confess that I only discovered the needle threader about a month ago!! Was looking through the manual and had always wondered what that grey lever was for... I had wondered about getting one of the very cheap lightweight machines for workshops...are they any good at all?? I see John Lewis do them.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on The Poorly Bernina... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Avis I agree, keep trying Christine. Ebay is awash with spare parts for every machine, a good service agent will track one down I'm sure. And best to find one not associated with a dealer or shop-based perhaps..they'd be very keen to sell you a new one after all.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on The Poorly Bernina... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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You've got me thinking S&D... I think we used the old Singer hand machines at school, if we were allowed near them once we'd spent two years smocking an apron that is.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on The Poorly Bernina... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Loving the Sewing Bee again Avis, though am missing May the judge (not the month)
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on The Poorly Bernina... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Erika...I am laughing at the thought of your singing washing machine and the choice of music, perfect:-)
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on The Poorly Bernina... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Bethany, yes! The Bernina Doctor had the means to load the software and restored the original stitches. I seem to remember the disc held a big selection and I had swapped them all around. I am over the moon with the little blanket stitch.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on The Poorly Bernina... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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It was state of the art when I got it for Christmas 2002 and we still use the empty box for the Christmas deccies. The Bernina Virtuosa 153 Quilter's Edition with stitches that you could programme in from a computer.... Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Heads up for you on a recent favourite read... Amy Liptrot's book The Outrun is the Daily Deal today in case anyone fancies a vicarious trip to Orkney. Posted on the move... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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It has been a while since I have read a poetry collection cover to cover, but when Reward for Winter by Di Slaney arrived from Valley Press, a Scarborough-based independent publisher, several planets of current interest aligned and it jumped... Continue reading
Posted May 18, 2016 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I don't really need to ask permission to buy books, but just occasionally, when I feel like I've bought quite a few, I might casually say to Bookhound... 'Tell me to buy this book that I really really want and... Continue reading
Posted May 16, 2016 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Elizabeth yes! The pink dot is us and the field we were built in, a few years after the tithe map was drawn up, is called Over Down. There were three houses down amongst the orchards though and I want to put them on if I do a larger version. By the 1891 census there doesn't seem to be anyone living down there, just in our house, so who knows what may have happened and no sign of houses now, just the barns. I would sell a cat to have a picture of them but haven't been able to find anything yet.
Toggle Commented May 15, 2016 on Tex-Tithing...the Method at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I can't begin to describe just how much I have enjoyed creating this first map in the Textithe project and while we are on the subject here's my method. Firstly all the background research and then drawing up my pattern,... Continue reading
Posted May 14, 2016 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I feel like that should be a Bee Gees song and I should be throwing a few disco moves but no, it's been on with the boots and some sedate striding (landskipping no less) around our corner of the Parish.... Continue reading
Posted May 12, 2016 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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'Time is stitched into this landscape,' notes Anna Pavord in her latest book Landskipping - Painters, Ploughmen and Places, and I knew in an instant what she meant. And this piece of advice, from artist Samuel Palmer in 1850, also... Continue reading
Posted May 10, 2016 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I'm not quite sure how this one passed me by, but the long list has been announced for one of my favourite book prizes, the Thwaites Wainwright. "The Wainwright Prize seeks to reward the best writing on the outdoors, nature... Continue reading
Posted May 10, 2016 at dovegreyreader scribbles
Thank you for all the tulip tips everyone. I'm thinking some feeding over the next few weeks and then planting nice and deep in a Tulip Corner and we'll see what reappears. Meanwhile can't wait for the catalogues to start arriving.
Toggle Commented May 10, 2016 on Tulips at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Susan, that is just devastating to read....precious homes and belongings gone. And what a true test of a nation it is when something like this happens.
Toggle Commented May 9, 2016 on Dear Canada... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Erika, I love the way old projects come back into the limelight and work their magic again. I never feel guilty about them...well maybe only that Kaffe Fassett quilt UFO. I have a half knitted Rams and Yowes blanket that winked at me today and awaits the return of my knitting mojo currently dormant.
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I can't claim to be an expert on the tulip, in fact I really only planted my first batch about two years ago. There is something tragic to me about spending all that money on good bulbs only to get... Continue reading
Posted May 8, 2016 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Jen Jones, who started the Welsh Quilt Musuem, was finding quilts insulating tractor engines which is why she decided to start preserving them. Biochemist, I hope yours had enjoyed a happy life too.
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...we have been following the devastating fire on the news and are thinking of you and hoping you are all safe. Please do let us know how things are if you can. Posted on the move... Continue reading
Posted May 7, 2016 at dovegreyreader scribbles
Susanne, I am sure there are connections with the Acland family of Killerton near Exeter , St Kilda the island and the Australian name too. I need to do more looking up. Acland family philanthropy towards the islanders involving help to improve their living conditions is mentioned in this book but I think they sailed there and there is a boat involved too. If only I'd looked it up first, this from wikipaedia.. "Before being officially named St Kilda in 1841 by Charles La Trobe, who was superintendent of the Port Phillip District of New South Wales, the area was known by several names, including 'Green Knoll' and 'The Village of Fareham'. It was named after the schooner the Lady of St Kilda, which was owned between 1834 and 1840 by Sir Thomas Acland. In 1840 Thomas Acland sold the vessel to Jonathan Cundy Pope of Plymouth who sailed for Port Phillip in Melbourne in February 1841. The vessel was moored at the main beach for most of that year, which was soon known as "the St Kilda foreshore."[8][9] The schooner "Lady of St Kilda" was named in honor of Lady Grange, who was imprisoned on the island of Hirta, the largest island in the St Kilda archipelago, on the western edge of Scotland, by her husband in 1734–40."
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Erika you had me googling in an instant because I clearly remember the Tristan da Cunha volcanic eruption and everyone being evacuated to Britain. Now I see it was 1961 so I would have been 8....a nicely impressionable age for a big adventure like that. Are there any good books to recommend about the island? I want to know more now!
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