This is dovegreyreader's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following dovegreyreader's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
dovegreyreader
Devon, U.K.
A Devonshire-based bookaholic, sock-knitting quilter who was a Community Nurse once upon a time.
Interests: reading, quilting, sock knitting, books, walking,
Recent Activity
It occurred to me how many times we might have missed a scene like that when we were out at work all day...so seeing it was one of the early joys of being ‘retired’ and having the time to stand and stare.
1 reply
Penny we live in ripe hunting and shooting territory and indeed, with a son who is a Gamekeeper, and loves his job, I have had to reframe a lot of my thinking about it all. There are no easy or comfortable answers to it when you have that level of family involvement but he is very good at explaining it all to me. Every conversation usually ends with ‘It’s a question of balance’ especially with things like rats and rabbits. Rats were the main reason we gave up on chickens and the reason we don’t have a compost heap for waste food, only for garden waste. We have to be extremely careful living here. I was interested to read in John Lewis Stempel’s latest book The Wood that he blasts a shotgun into the squirrel dreys because they raid all the nests for eggs so you are not alone in that one. Fox is a tricky one too and yes the hunt rides across the land that surrounds us here and past the garden gate.
1 reply
Fran, I think you would enjoy Foxes Unearthed too and thank you for reading this one and commenting with your thoughts. The distances covered were the first thing that struck me, one of the many things that Brian Carter gets spot on. The book has certainly added new perspectives to my thoughts and emotions when I see a fox now. The sight of a heavily pregnant vixen sniffing around our compost heap in all that snowy cold weather was something to behold. According to our Gamekeeper she should have been holed up in her den being cared for by her mate which got us all thinking that perhaps she was alone and having to hunt for herself. All I could think of for days was Teg and how I would feel the next time the hunt gallops over the horizon.
1 reply
Thanks for reading it Carol. Like you I had moments of real emotion as I read it. And yes, all so human in their emotions and beliefs but still animals. We will make the pilgrimage to Kitty Jay’s grave on your visit.
1 reply
Losing hens to foxes is a tragedy that we have suffered too CF, nothing worse than that run full of feathers in the morning. I wish I could remember which book I read a while back that was a spirited defence of this behaviour in foxes. It might have been Foxes Unearthed, I’m not sure, but it did much to explain this behaviour in foxes and much else about them besides. I emerged from the book with a radical new understanding and new sympathies. We still don’t keep chickens any more though.
1 reply
Image
At my request Bloomsbury very kindly sent proof copies of A Black Fox Running to three people who I thought would enjoy the book. My thanks to Fran and Carol for leaving comments on yesterday's blog post, I've promised them... Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
Image
He appears after dark, reads the wind with his nose, mirrors the moon in his eys, laps the dew, feels the grass sing in his blood. Ebb and flow of stars, waves of trees breaking on the sky -these are... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
10
Image
Hello Chums, Magnus here and as you can see I've been very busy supervising work in the greenhouse... I'm a bit confused about all this sewing... and then there's this other sowing, but never mind. I'm a bit averse to... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
50
It’s a seasonal thing I think, Poldark sees us through the autumn and then CTM cheers us through into spring and then we all get out in the garden and forget the TV is there...you have a dilemma now Judith!
1 reply
I know what you mean about the lack of ‘unresolved badness’ ...I’m not sure how we’d cope! I think we’ve all come to expect justice to be done and there will be sorrow but something will come right for someone somehow. I particularly like it when the girls who were going to give the babies up for adoption decide to keep them! And I do love the young lad with Downs and his rapport with Fred and his wife because that didn’t start well.
1 reply
I do like Greyladies. I bought and read all the medical ones written by a doctor at the London in the 1920s who then became a GP (name escapes me and I’m miles from the shelf). Sister Ann Returns was one and I think I bought a Noel Streatfeild too...Parson’s Nine?
1 reply
Tamar, that is so true...the book stands as a social record and as such is really important on that basis alone.
1 reply
Li, welcome from Hawaii...I hope you are OK through the recent storms. A friend has been posting pictures and it looks awful. Meanwhile I do hope you get to see more series of CTM.
1 reply
Oooh I have that book! Thanks for the prompt, I’ll get it off the shelf and take a look.
1 reply
I’m ever so sorry Elizabeth! I have added a footnote to the original post now warning of spoilers. I hope it doesn’t ruin it for you...just enjoy it all anyway and please come back and let us know what you thought. I do love a good binge watch of anything and that would include CTM ...maybe it’s time to start over and watch it all again.
1 reply
Oh Ann, I’ve just read your blog post so hope you are on the mend. I will download a sample of your dad’s book to my kindle and have a read!
1 reply
Lynne, I think we MUST have met! I shared a room in Rutland House in 1972-73. It faced the back garden as I recall and had what must have been the most lethal gas fire. I loved it there and am still in touch with my room mate who left to get married and never finished her training. And then I was at the London in 1974-5 and lived in Cavell Home in East Mount Street.
1 reply
Claire, I have been buried in Philip Hensher’s book for what seems like weeks now and am loving every word. Sadly I have had a few ‘issues’ with the first book you mention! It will all come out one day if I ever write a memoir!
1 reply
Image
My penchant for writing down the names of the inns and pubs of In Pursuit of Spring (more than seventy by the end of the book) is only matched by Edward Thomas's obsession with noting the names and epitaphs in... Continue reading
Posted Apr 16, 2018 at dovegreyreader scribbles
That is an amazing price!! Godspeed to the pearls, safe journey !
1 reply
Nice to think of your walking season mirroring ours Jude!
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2018 on The Walking Season at dovegreyreader scribbles
1 reply
Bet, once we are back up to speed after a winter of sloth we’ll do about eight miles. This was about 4.5. Interestingly 4.5 would have been good going a year ago so we have certainly got fitter.
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2018 on The Walking Season at dovegreyreader scribbles
1 reply
Image
Whilst taking nothing for granted, I would like to think the summer Wednesday Walking season is almost upon us. The portents are looking favourable. My Walking Friend and I were determined to keep our boots a-roving through the winter if... Continue reading
Posted Apr 13, 2018 at dovegreyreader scribbles
Gosh Karen, good to hear that all is well and the patient is mended. That can't have been at all nice, bring on the 'dull' I say! xx
Toggle Commented Apr 12, 2018 on Now, where were we? at Cornflower Books
1 reply
Ooh good and I will be interested to hear how available the book is over your side Elizabeth. I don't know why I was surprised to see so many 'of the moment' UK books on the shelves in NZ branch libraries but I was...some better stocked than our own.
1 reply