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dovegreyreader
Devon, U.K.
A Devonshire-based bookaholic, sock-knitting quilter who was a Community Nurse once upon a time.
Interests: reading, quilting, sock knitting, books, walking,
Recent Activity
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In keeping with my annual tradition (borne of not being allowed out to play on Good Friday as a child) dovegreyreader scribbles will have a quiet phase over Easter... and this year signing off for a little bit longer, which... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Sandham Memorial Chapel, not Sanditon and currently closed for restoration work apparently, reopens in August.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Berwick Church at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Virginia, I think this might be the Sanditon Memorial Chapel?? Or name similar...
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Berwick Church at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Hmm, no Bruce Chatwin on Kindle...well in the words of JL Carr, we can 'ask and ask' so perhaps we need a concerted campaign of pressing that 'tell the publisher I'd like to read this on Kindle' button on Amazon:-)
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Barbara, it is definitely apparent to me that age is changing so much about my reading ...and having been writing here for 8 years I am sort of revealing that change as I go along on here I now realise!! My first read found it moving but this second one has done so much more...and yes, what those young men lost, so many clever literary ways of demonstrating it.
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Mrs D I am thinking what a wonderful book to read through that transition from city to the peace of rural life...not unlike leaving a battlefield for something more tranquil and can see how this would be the perfect book to fall back on in such situations. Isn't it amazing how one small book can fulfil so ,any requirements. I am wondering if rereading it reminds you of the mood of that time?? Thank you for news of the church too. We are currently planning a trip down to Cornwall having heard news of the church at St Hilary which has paintings by the Newlyn artists including Laura and Harold Knight. There must be some real treasures tucked away waiting to be 'discovered'.
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Oh Caroline, yes...Bruce Chatwin! I had forgotten about him and it is years since I read On the Black Hill, I will move that onto the tbr pile instantly. I haven't seen the film of it either, thanks for the prompt.
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Liz, I am now trying to think of more writers like Carr and Fitzgerald ...they must be out there. Sometimes these short, quiet books really fit the reading bill and I could do with more of them, sort of fall-back staples.
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Very good news...The Last Englishman is only £2.10 on Kindle at the moment ...just be sure to buy the right book, there is another of the same title about Arthur Ransome, probably just as interesting.
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Claire I have Pat Barker waiting in the wings, thank you for the reminder. What are your thoughts on the other JLC novels...are they worth tracking down??
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Margarete, I didn't know of the NYRB edition, I will need to investigate that Michael Holroyd intro as I am intrigued to read more thoughts about it. It's a book that can't be faulted in any way to my mind and with so much there to find for anyone who chooses to look... As Gill says, so many themes...I should add recuperation to the list and yes, the healing powers of the countryside.
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Gill, I have elevated the book to one I would want to read regularly along with Penelope Fitzgerald's novels, and interesting to know that they knew each other, there are real similarities in the mood and quiet impact of the writing. Immensely powerful but gently so, and books like that seem rare.
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Cathy, I have Elizabeth Speller's book here so would love to know your thoughts. In my efforts to avoid actual trench warfare it may be one that I have to make an exception for. Interestingly I still call it the Great War too.
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Thoughts of painting in churches as I read A Month in the Country reminded me of my visit to Berwick Church in Sussex last year with Fran, and the promised pictures which never quite materialised on here. This seemed like... Continue reading
Posted Apr 15, 2014 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Carol S...I have to confess I am a fan of The Crimson Field, but I think I am in the minority, most people seem to be finding it dire. I am finding some of the characters fascinating, and yes, cliched maybe but it's hard to reinvent anything different about the actualities of the Great War, and perhaps it is bringing the whole story to a new generation.
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Sally, interestingly, in these days of trying to whittle my book shelves down, this is a book that I would love to own in a special edition..I will explore the Folio one so thanks for mentioning it.
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Oh Linda, just taken it back in this morning!!! Perhaps run over there and see if you can have it?? It came from another branch so they will be sending it off again...give them a ring.
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'We can ask and ask but we can't have again what once seemed ours for ever....they've gone and you can only wait for the pain to pass...' I have been giving some thought to my COBALT (Crisis Of Brilliance Art... Continue reading
Posted Apr 14, 2014 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Reading all your comments is like reading those two sections with new eyes...this is such a GOOD way to read a book. I wondered about Maan and Firoz too, and had also read the piece by VS's mother so wondered whether this was a subtle allusion in the book. Interestingly, my ears prick up at any reference to India on the radio or elsewhere now, and in a way they may not have done before, which all makes me think the book has well and truly crept into my consciousness. Last weekend ( I think) a concert on Radio 3, Nicola Benedetti and a student orchestra on a tour of India and all saying what a wonderful and welcoming country it was...seven of the musicians about to join a newly formed Indian orchestra there apparently. Jane I had been wondering about Rasheed and whether he would reappear and I would dearly love to know that the abused daughter (sorry name escapes me) situation was resolved for the better. A Suitable Girl is scheduled for April 2015 and I know I will be wanting to read it immediately, and yes, a second read of ASB would be very beneficial. Thank you so much for such a lively and fascinating discussion everyone x
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Re Dorothy Dunnett, should I keep them?? They are right by the back door in carrier bags...maybe Kindle if ever I get the urge??
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Heather I doubt I would have managed this without the Kindle version so that I can open it on every journey. Like you I wondered how I might fare with it but it seems to have been fine. I am now admitting that I am starting to prefer Kindle to the real thing these days...and I cannot believe I have just written that.
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Oooh Erika, now this is a very interesting thought...does Seth take himself too seriously...I wonder. Whilst you might have set A Suitable Boy aside I am hoping you might make some space to read An Equal Music. It is one of my very favourite books (read 3 times which is a lot for me). Entirely different to ASB and with a musical underscore which has a CD to go with it ...I'd love to know what you thought of it, and does it read like an entirely different author??
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We are very excited about them Roxanne...and Kate I meant to say, the Pride of Barbados that you sent is just peeking through..it seems to have enjoyed the 100 degs weve had in the greenhouse! My Himalayan poppies will be a real prize if I can get them into flower, Im thinking of putting them in a large pot this year just to be sure. www.dovegreyreader.co.uk
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Susan, you have good reason! Interestingly I cleared nettles and brambles off a wild bank last year to allow the periwinkle to have its way instead, and it has looked a treat this spring, a mass of purple flowers. We had almost forgotten it was there it was so submerged. I have a little soft spot for it remembering that it was used in vincristine, one of the first chemo drugs...it always seems like a momentous discovery, much like yew and its uses for great cancer. Enjoy your crocuses, ours have been and gone and we are currently a riot of primroses which have apparently loved our very wet winter.
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Kate, they will be on their way this week...your violets arrived beautifully intact and are in. So lovely to have some at last. I did sow some seed last summer and they have finally just peeked through so I am hopeful of more.
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