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dovegreyreader
Devon, U.K.
A Devonshire-based bookaholic, sock-knitting quilter who was a Community Nurse once upon a time.
Interests: reading, quilting, sock knitting, books, walking,
Recent Activity
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There was one walk on Dartmoor that we particularly wanted to do in November. I had borrowed a book from the library, With Magic in My Eyes - West Country Literary Landscapes by Anthony Gibson (yes, of course I have... Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Dynnargh dhe Lanstefan, welcome to Launceston. Twenty or more years of parking the car in the town and looking across to the castle and I'd like £1 for every time we have said 'Must go up there one day.'... Three... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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'Today's allotment is not just a place to grow vegetables but a socially mediated space, shaped by local and national politics, by immigration, economics, public health and social change.' We know plenty of people who have had, or have an... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Lottie, I was quite surprised to see pictures of the windows, much more modern than I was expecting and all the better for it, fabulous colours. Thank heavens the Anglican church can move with the times and be creating this sort of thing for posterity...imagine people looking at those in a few hundred years time as we look at old stained glass now. Let's hope so anyway!
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Fran, I remember now, we saw some. Hoping the library get the books for you, I fear some will have to convert into wish list though! Definitely days when Dartmoor doesn't beckon, but isn't amazing how books and a fire can bring joy to the greyest winter afternoon. I almost relish days like that now.
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Anne, I have just had a look...what wonderful colours in those windows. I must admit I don't really know Thomas Traherne that well but that quote had really whetted my appetite for more so I must explore.
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That's your Christmas sorted then Carol, and you can start Meadowland at the beginning unlike me who couldn't wait and jumped in half way. Have you read Field Notes from a Hidden City by Esther Woolfson, it's very good.
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Oh but Diane, the lure of the Pacific, what a joy to be able to walk it.
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Alice, you will love High Dartmoor and ignore all those copies for £195 on Amazon (well maybe it was just the one I saw!) We saw one for sale at a book fair last week for £65, which is only £15 more than we paid back in the early 1980s...mind you felt like a mortgage back then. Very sad that Eric Hemery died very suddenly out on Dartmoor soon after the books was published, it's a terrific legacy.
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Liz, Meadowland has become a constant now and I feel sure it is destined to sit alongside Notes From Walnut Tree Farm and become a regular annual/daily read. I do know what you mean about that 'being desperate to go walking somewhere' feeling. We are very lucky just to be able to walk out of the gate and be there. I am reading Esther Woolfson's Nature Notes From a Hidden City, it is very revealing and certainly spells out that we don't have the monopoly on nature and walking here in the country.
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Isn't it lovely Ann. Though Ted Hughes wasn't really a Moorman his observations were spot on.
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Avis, that is so true about never really knowing Dartmoor. I am slowly accumulating a series of tried and tested walks again after years of easy ones with small children and a Border Collie who adored rounding up sheep so it was never that relaxing. Now I can just walk and watch and listen and take in the views. Love that book coincidence, wonderful.
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'You never enjoy the world aright till the sea itself flows in your veins, till you are clothed with the heavens and crowned with the stars, till you so love the beauty of enjoying it you are earnest to persuade... Continue reading
Posted Nov 18, 2014 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Good question Sarah. There doesnt seem to be anywhere to ask for a paper copy, details might have come in the regular email Little Toller send and I emailed to ask for one, so perhaps contact them via the Contact link on the website.
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There is nothing like a book about something very specific, let's say an ash tree, to suddenly make me notice ash trees all over the place, and where previously I may just have walked past... This one, spotted on the... Continue reading
Posted Nov 16, 2014 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Oh Liz, what a wonderful story to set the seal on this week's posts. We've just watched War Horse which almost finished us off, I can't decide which sets me off more, the real thing or the puppets, but perhaps one of the best WW1 films to be made/stories to be written.
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The last of this week's Great War posts today, but what a fascinating discussion we have had in comments. Thank you to everyone who has added such thoughtful and interesting replies. It is always the best bit of any blog... Continue reading
Posted Nov 14, 2014 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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News from the publisher (Bloomsbury) today of a forthcoming book, here's the email for your info if anyone is interested. I just wanted to let you know about a new book, Vera Brittain and the First World War by Mark Bostridge. We publish on 4th December. The new book by Vera Brittain’s literary executor and biographer explores Brittain’s experiences in the war and how losing the four young men closest to her led her to write Testament of Youth, informing her eventual decision to become a pacifist. Mark Bostridge has been a consultant on the making of the new film, and the book features an essay ‘From Book to Film’ including interviews with the cast and producers, as well as with members of Brittain’s family such as Shirley Williams. It also features stills from the film and photos from the Vera Brittain archive. Testament of Youth, made by BBC and Heyday Films, premiered at the London Film Festival to glowing reviews.
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So much to think about here and so good to read all your thoughts. It is never as simple as it may seem is it...and Margarete, what interesting insights you offer on those Berlin Wall commemorations...celebrations...I don't think I know what to call these moments any more and it is clear there can be no one single meaning or interpretation. Each of us is going to see and understand the same thing differently...and that's what makes it all work in a way I think, makes us think. I have thought so much more about the poppies in the light of all your thoughts. I have to say I felt genuinely upset at Sheila Hancock's suggestion that we should all watch them be mown down and smashed to smithereens by a tank so that we really understood the broken bodies of the Great War. I feel we have seen those bodies broken once, and lived with that memory and the remembrance of it all our lives... we don't need to see them smashed again, but rather kept whole...and doing some good too. The RBL at least will benefit.
Toggle Commented Nov 14, 2014 on Poppies at the Tower at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Margarete, one thing Crisis of Brilliance (the book about the war artists) makes clear is that so many went with enthusiasm but felt cheated and duped when they realised what was happening, but how little of that truth made it back home. I think Bertrans Russell was one of Ottoline Morrell's many lovers, she was the Bloomsbury equivalent of Ettie Desborough now I think about it, the Hostess with the Mostest.
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Rhys, I think it reveals a great deal about the anguish they suffered too, wartime losses were great amongst the aristocracy and they too struggled with keeping a stiff upper lip and setting an example from the Big House. Ettie had the ear and the confidences, and doubtless the fears of the politicians, ahead of the war so she must have known her sons would be at risk.
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Our theme at the Endsleigh Salon this week, and not surprisingly given that we met on 11/11, was The Great War. A wide selection of books was forthcoming, amongst them Into the Silence - The Great War, Mallory and the... Continue reading
Posted Nov 12, 2014 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Rhys, I am intrigued to know why your friend was horrified? I have a list of books that this one book sent me in search of, and which I will put on here later this week. You might want to read Ettie by Richard Davenport Hines after this interesting introduction to Lady Desborough.
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Saved for today for obvious reasons, my final choice of books for that Persephone Lunch talk... I suspect anyone who knows Persephone Books has a favourite endpaper and mine has never been displaced from its number one slot. A few... Continue reading
Posted Nov 10, 2014 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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We sang our hearts out and I am still waking at 3am with the Faure Kyrie ringing in my ears for some reason. But our concert in that little village church raised over £500 for SSAFA so we are all very pleased.
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