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dovegreyreader
Devon, U.K.
A Devonshire-based bookaholic, sock-knitting quilter who was a Community Nurse once upon a time.
Interests: reading, quilting, sock knitting, books, walking,
Recent Activity
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You may recall my foray into the novels of Iris Murdoch which was going so well before Christmas. Well' I haven't been able to get back into them again yet but had written this post about The Bell which I... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at dovegreyreader scribbles
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We have been following the Anzac centenary commemorations this weekend, and also some incredibly moving tributes to lost relatives on Facebook, whilst thinking that our poppy from the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' at the Tower of London... Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Oh thank you Virginia, some listening would be good too, I'm going to seek that out.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Pick up a Trollope at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Annone, I think the Pallisers start with Can You Forgive her and then move onto Phineas Finn, The Eustace Diamonds, Phineas Redux, The Prime Minister and The Duke's Children in that order.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Pick up a Trollope at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Joanna Trollope rates Miss Mackenzie as her ancestor's best book so I shall be onto that next, but meanwhile I am absolutely riveted by Barchester Towers all over again. Obadiah Slope and his lumpy red hair cemented with grease, and his capacious and shining forehead and his spongy porous nose..it's a wonder any of us held a torch for Alan Rickman after that..or perhaps it was only me??
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Pick up a Trollope at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Happy Camper Angela had recently visited Antony House, just across the river in Cornwall, and said we had to go soonest to see the camellias and magnolias in flower on the woodland walk. Keen to get our moneysworth from the... Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Heavens above Araminta, you remind that I haven't yet put up the blog post about The Bell. I wrote it before Christmas I think and what with one thing and another...I must sort that for next week.
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Heavens what a busy week of bookish happenings and there was me thinking we'd all have a rest today. Sorry no, I'm back again because apparently it's time to pick up a Trollope. The Trollope Society emailed to say that... Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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...John Lewis-Stempel, the winner of this year's Wainwright Prize, for his book Meadowland - The Private Life of an English Field. I would have been delighted for any of this excellent shortlist to have won, but of all the books... Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Having missed three Endsleigh Salons this year I pulled all the stops out for my return in April, so instead of (lazily) making a book I had read fit the theme I chose a specific one for this month. For... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Thinking about that last sentence Carol, about knowing a field was poor grazing and could only support twenty cows...something you wouldn't know presumably unless the information was handed down. The fields around us now managed by learned looking agronomists who we sometimes come across doing their reports when we are out walking...science has replaced local knowledge and instinct on the land as much as it has anywhere else.
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Osmosis comes with time as we have discovered too Jude, and clearly this takes twenty years! We feel a real affinity with our surroundings now and can predict and see the signs in ways that wouldn't have occurred to us when we first moved here. I look back and think how naive we were, and plenty of mistakes to make (and we did!) as we took to rural life...I mean where did we think the water was going to come from for a start?? Now of course our spring supply would be a USP, water the garden all day for free, what's not to love!
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Bless the monks Fran, it is hard to imagine the scale of their land ownership back in the day or how they could possibly oversee it all. So much to go round between far fewer people especially after the Black Death. I get a real buzz from imagining it all and I know you do too and all that history around you there, 1066 and all that!
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Maws, we identify with this...two children who roam the planet, one who rarely leaves the parish, all three have a wealth of knowledge of enormous value. And the more we walk and walk the same land the better we get to know it and the more we see. No tiny change goes unnoticed.
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Cath, sending sunshine and thank you for that quote. I keep meaning to explore John Burnside's poetry so that is a welcome reminder. What a lovely word. I am thinking about the word 'heft' from The Shepherd's Life...it is the familiar paths and territory that a sheep learns and remembers, and I am thinking humans have something very similar.
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Gill, the sadness is in the dying isn't it, so many of my dad's friends are lines crossed out in his address book, page after page of names I knew of and would love to talk to now about their memories of friendship. I have a winter's work ahead of me with these albums I think!
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Carol, CHICKS ...Country Holidays for Inner City Children is very active around us here. It is so easy to take the freedoms of the countryside for granted, especially those you mention about children being allowed to make a noise and let off steam without being labelled as trouble. the same might be said for the grown ups!
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Jane that is such a valid point about the photos of the future, and also the quality because even if we print digital photos ourselves, which so many people do these days, the quality seems to deteriorate very quickly. Quite a few that my dad had printed off have disintegrated in my hands. A vast amount of history is going to be lost.
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I have been trying to remember where and when I first heard about Shadows in the Hay - Landscape, nature and the passage of time on a Herefordshire farm by Colin Williams, and I think it was on one of... Continue reading
Posted Apr 19, 2015 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Tonight Don Juan's Reckless Daughter, I am enjoying my Joni-Fest so much and good to know I am not the only one. I think too, how lucky to find her at an impressionable age, and keep her music alongside all these years. Has anyone been to see the new Carol King musical?? She was another one I loved. Tapestry...wonderful
Toggle Commented Apr 19, 2015 on Joni at dovegreyreader scribbles
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We haven't had a Joni Mitchell conversation for ages, and I really feel we should because didn't we all get a fright. Joni found unconscious at her home and rushed into hospital and intensive care a few weeks ago. I... Continue reading
Posted Apr 18, 2015 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I am having a bit of a happy Snow Goose problem. I don't seem to be able to stop myself buying any plant that happens to be called Snow Goose, and Endsleigh Nurseries, barely five minutes from home, is becoming... Continue reading
Posted Apr 16, 2015 at dovegreyreader scribbles
Jean, I have read Mrs Robinsons's Disgrace and you are right, same issues about the power of money and how women were controlled by their lack of it...and likewise in Greenbanks, Louisa, when widowed hands over contro, of her finances to her son who makes a right hash of it but still exerts the control over his mother, so no freedom even when the spouse dies. I interviewed Kate Summerscale at Port Eliot a few years ago, it must be on here somewhere. Thinking now how many books delineate this situation...
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Carol, it sounds like the Zugunruhe is happening! Safe journey back. And talking of building shelter, a fascinating programme called The Island is testing exactly those human skills. Whilst much of it is might be contrived and well-edited a group of men and a group of women have been parked on separate remote and uninhabited Pacific Islands apparently with just 24hrs of water and no food and now have to survive. Now I'm sure all is not as it appears, but the building of shelters is proving quite a challenge to say nothing of lighting a fire and finding food.
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I just knew it would be a Persephone book to the rescue, and that it might be a Dorothy Whipple that would end my fiction drought, and I wasn't wrong. Greenbanks, published in 1932, and the Book of the Month... Continue reading
Posted Apr 14, 2015 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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