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dovegreyreader
Devon, U.K.
A Devonshire-based bookaholic, sock-knitting quilter who was a Community Nurse once upon a time.
Interests: reading, quilting, sock knitting, books, walking,
Recent Activity
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At hawthorn-time in Wiltshire travelling In search of something chance would never bring, An old man’s face, by life and weather cut And coloured,—rough, brown, sweet as any nut,— A land face, sea-blue-eyed,—hung in my mind... Edward Thomas ‘Lob’ It... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at dovegreyreader scribbles
And thank you to for the link to the Ringing World site Kris, I’m a bit addicted now! What wonderful names and who knew so many bells are being rung in any one day around the world.
Toggle Commented yesterday on The Quarter Peal at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Gill, for 25 years we ran our interior design business from the premises to the left of that tower, right underneath it. Tuesday evenings, Bell-ringing practise nights, were a complete no-no for running my patchwork classes. So lovely to hear them though and I’m looking forward to a return trip up the tower at the church summer fete in July.
Toggle Commented yesterday on The Quarter Peal at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Oooh Kris, thank you so much for this! I was hoping someone would come along and explain. I looked it up and was none the wiser so decided not to go there in the post, but I do at least understand a bit more thanks to your comment. I realised after I’d written it (probably at 3am) that it would be impossible to call that many changes in the allotted time. And I’m so pleased to know that name of the ringing as in Grandsire Caters...we were making all sorts of wisecracks about Triple Bobs without knowing a thing!
Toggle Commented yesterday on The Quarter Peal at dovegreyreader scribbles
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The novelty may well wear off, and my apologies if you have already seen this, but I think I have just discovered how to embed my little Instagram video clips onto here, and I couldn't resist sharing the Quarter Peal... Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Before I wax lyrical about Melissa Harrison's second novel, At Hawthorn Time, later this week, I thought I would resurrect an extract from a post I wrote on here in 2014 about her debut novel Clay. It has been good... Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
As Carol has said, and as I hadn’t really thought about...the Chapel was there when Thomas Tallis wrote his music, which is an amazing thought. Even more amazing to me was the idea that Henry VIII is buried under the Quire.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on One Fine Day... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Nooo, you haven’t rained on the parade Thomas, it’s always good to get other opinions. I think we are so used to the rather sedate Cof E ceremonial here, and especially on those big occasions, that Bishop Curry took everyone by surprise. I almost wonder if they were smiling rather than smirking, at the way he’d thwarted centuries of tradition and brought life and spontaneity into the proceedings. It would have been hard to sit po-faced through something so alive and vibrant. All we can say is God Bless America for sharing Bishop Michael with us, I reckon he’ll be back!
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on One Fine Day... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I knew you’d all be watching! Interestingly I hadn’t really paid much attention in the run up, not even got that excited about the day really...the press were going so crazy about all the shenanigans I just found myself sighing and wondering if the couple were wishing they’d eloped. But dawneth the day and I realised it felt imperative not to miss it. If one thing grated it was the TV commentators going on and on about the mixed race element. Karen Gibson from the Kingdom Choir put that firmly in perspective when she was asked...she’s a young woman in love, let’s focus on that. Incidentally, having come across Karen Gibson on Gareth Malone’s (was he there?) choir programmes I thought she and her choir were stupendous. I’ve listened to Stand By Me over and again today.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on One Fine Day... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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If you partook in the day I hope you all enjoyed yesterday as much as we did. Bookhound kept saying he was going to mow the grass/ walk the dogs/ do things, but in the end I think, like me,... Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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On that recent trip to London, and wandering through Bloomsbury to lunch and revisit The Lost Words exhibition, I walked along Great Ormond Street with Adele Geras and Helen Rappaport and took them into the children's hospital to see the... Continue reading
Posted May 16, 2018 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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'On May 15 1967 Graham Green wrote to his brother Dr Raymond Green to ask how a character could be killed off without arousing suspicion. 'Could you help with a suggestion?' he wrote. 'I am writing of a man in... Continue reading
Posted May 13, 2018 at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Jessica, thank you for adding the above, goodness me ...this... soon I have wandered in over the waves of the words to the temples of thought.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2018 on Mary Oliver at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Avis, like Tavistock, the Oxfam bookshop two doors along from the Indie. Sadly it is the Oxfam that seems more vibrant. I go in several times a week and rarely emerge empty-handed. Thank you for that news about the BL, it has changed since the 1990s in that case which is a good thing.
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What wonderful legacies our dads have left us x
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Janet, thank you for this, it’s good to have memories from librarians on this thread. Maybe you know the answer to the infectious diseases question...what did happen to the books? Is that what the rexine covers were about...did they get a quick wipe? It has always mystified me but must have been an issue back in the day when contagious diseases were so much more prevalent and risky.
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Libraries stay in the memory it would seem Bet. I can visualise them now. I eventually looked up Mitcham Library and then Wallington on google and I was right. Both very lovely, quite imposing ‘stately homes’ to look at, and very similar. This in the day when very special buildings were allocated or donated for library use.
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That is some achievement Angela, bit like flying up to Guides from Brownies if ever you did that! There I’ve sort of ceremony really shouldn’t there. I’m thinking about it now and I rarely see older children or teenagers in the adult section of our library. The children’s section always buzzing. I really do hope there is a generation up and coming who will use it.
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Avis, every author you mention would be on my list of formative reading too. We adored Jean Plaidy and one book would make its way around the entire classroom at senior school.i suspect we all watched the same films too...The Inn of the Sixth Happiness, maybe A Town Like Alice...films that could be followed up with the books. Is the BL open to all-comers now? I triedto get access when I was doing my OU degree and they said only for those doing MA or higher, I was very disappointed at the time.
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Aah, Lesley I’m so sorry to have made you cry but what happy memories those are! When I sat down to write this piece, having driven home from the library with it in my head, it just poured out in one draft. I didn’t change a thing, proof read it and sent it in. I didn’t want to mess with the memory at all. And yes, we travelled to school on our own from a very young age too. The 118 bus across Mitcham and we’d often walk home across the Common.
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Lisa, you now remind me about reading a good book under the desk at school during a ‘boring’ lesson! I loved How Green Was My Valley too, some adult novels were very accessible to children with a good reading age. I read Jamaica Inn when I was about ten or eleven I think. It was the only book I could find at my grandparents cottage in Devon while we were staying there. That first read has stayed with me, I think of it every time we drive past Jamaica Inn now.
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Valorie, does the town make much of that I wonder? Here in the UK we’d probably have plaques and festivals and goodness knows what! Thank you for the twitter link ....I think you need to cut and paste the permalink at the bottom of the post or from your title bar if you are able to do it.
Toggle Commented May 10, 2018 on Mary Oliver at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Oh Cath, I had Felicity in my hand in the bookshop today with my winnings in the other hand ready to buy it. Opened it only to find a ripped page and it was the only copy. I will get it soon though. I don’t know Rutger Kopland, thank you for the mention, I’m off to investigate.
Toggle Commented May 10, 2018 on Mary Oliver at dovegreyreader scribbles
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This is lovely Bet and a perfect example of a poem that speaks such sense.
Toggle Commented May 10, 2018 on Mary Oliver at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Jan she writes consolation beautifully, they will uplift at every turn. And she does grief too because her long term partner died and she somehow captures the moments of missing and loss so well.
Toggle Commented May 10, 2018 on Mary Oliver at dovegreyreader scribbles
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