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dovegreyreader
Devon, U.K.
A Devonshire-based bookaholic, sock-knitting quilter who was a Community Nurse once upon a time.
Interests: reading, quilting, sock knitting, books, walking,
Recent Activity
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Staying on the Rowena Farre - Seal Morning trail laid by Happy Camper Angela at our Endsleigh Salon evening on Pseudonyms last month, I eventually diverted off at a crossroads and read Island of Dreams - A Personal History of... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at dovegreyreader scribbles
Sue D, great to hear you have actually visited the wood. I would love to have chatted to Richard Fortey and in particular asked him how possessive he felt about it all. He did say that a dog-walking company frequent the paths and though initially he had worried about them there had turned out to be advantages...I just can't remember what they were! Mountain bikers on the other hand seemed to offer no benefits
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Lovely poem Erika...I rue that fact that I didn't learn more by heart at an age when I could have done. It was all Shakespeare soliloquoys...some nice poems would have been much better now.I agree about the IT helper, we have a list of things to be accomplished by the next one who walks in the door!
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No, I'm thinking its mother came and found it Fran! It's safe and well and free somewhere! This is the first year that our dogs have taken an interest in baby birds...Nell has been particularly naughty. But we do seem to have a real increase in the numbers nesting and fledging around the garden...we are seeing new babies every day at the moment...blackbirds, wrens, house martins, swallows, goldfinches
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Interesting that on your side of the pond the reds and greys can live side by side Bet. Clearly they must have different immune systems to ours perhaps.
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I'm guessing we've all but given up on the reds now Carol, on the mainland at least. Interesting to think they felt they might re-introduce them in London, how sad that it failed.
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Islands seem to be the best hope for the red squirrels. Have just been watching the BBC programme about New Zealand wild life and how the non-native predators are decimating it and then read something in today's Times about a massive cull they are about to have to help protect it.
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Clare, thank you for reading and for the plant ID. I think it's one of those with countless names. Give my eye teeth to see a red squirrel in the wild
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Avis, have you come across John Wright's latest book The History of Hedgerows? His list of species numbers thousands. We are very fortunate to live in such a deserted place that litter is a minimum...not even sure how that biodegradable bag found its way into the woods.
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S&D how good to hear that libraries will buy when you suggest a book. Devon Libraries have just migrated to a voluntary trust so im not sure what the line is on buying reader suggestions...but they have upped the cost of reservations to 75p and fines have gone up to.I'm afraid I take all our loose change with me and stand there for ages paying it into the machine.
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I'd like a woodland too Acornmoon, though 'ours' so quiet and unattended that it has almost felt like ours for the last 22 years.
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Rose, I am very pleased with my decision to slow down, set the book aside and read month by month. I either steam ahead or more often fail to keep up but am finding,with this book, that I am sadly excited about embarking on August!
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I had bought a full day ticket for the literary festival at Dartington last week and am so pleased I had booked to hear Richard Fortey talking about his book The Wood for the Trees - The Long View of... Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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I thought you might all appreciate a paddle in the Atlantic today, before the holidaymakers arrive... We were on a bit of an "In the Footsteps of Rena Gardiner" excursion using this book as our guide... Printed in 1985, from... Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
Um...electricity?? Old graves?? A lock on the door, the church is never locked apparently... Guessing now...tell me!
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Avis, thank you so much for the recommend, we went to Honeychurch today...what a beautiful little church it is.
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It seems to be Church Window week on here because six still going mad in Dorset and it was off to the village of Moreton where we hoped to find a nice tea room (we did, a splendid one in... Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Oh thanks for this Jo! Have just printed it off to await the sure and certain return of my knitting mojo.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Hexagonal thinking... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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you have it there Jude...just need to live long enough! I have gone back to my stash from the 1970s for this one as well as more recent additions. Proudly said to Bookhound that it had only actually cost me £12 for the calico (on special offer at the quilt show) and he looked at me and smiled nicely. Well OK, so I had paid money for it in the first place I suppose:-)
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Hexagonal thinking... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Oh biochemist, GO FOR IT! What a wonderful project that will be, there is something very fulfilling about picking up and running with something already begun, a sort of handing over of the baton. I did it with some blocks that my mum had made before her vision went haywire, it was a true labour of love which I then gave her for her 70th birthday and that turned out to be her last one so it was very special (I was sat up finishing the quilting at about 2am the night before!)
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Hexagonal thinking... at dovegreyreader scribbles
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Well at least they seem to have survived Barbara, I should imagine they are listed now. Thank you for the update.
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Avis, I don't know Honeychurch but will soon rectify that having just read what Hoskins has to say about it...thank you! Honeychurch church (St. Mary) is charming: very small, very remote, and completely unsophisticated. It is an almost untouched 12th century building, to which a W. tower and S. porch were added late in the 15th century. In the tower are the three medieval bells in their original cage. The chancel arch was also re-made at that date, the roof renewed, and Perpendicular windows inserted in the old walls. The fittings are in keeping with the building: an excellent Norman font beneath a rustic Jacobean cover, a rustic Elizabethan pulpit, a complete set of late medieval benches (some with carved ends, but most of plain unvarnished oak), a crude wall painting in the nave (possibly the Royal Arms of Elizabeth), altar rails of simple country carpentry: all as well kept as the mother-church at Sampford. Honeychurch has one of the simplest and most appealing interiors of all English country churches. It lives up to its delightful name in a way that so rarely happens, and just to see it on a fine morning puts one in a good humour for the rest of the day.
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One of the interesting things to emerge from the book was the depth of the Piper's friendships with so many famous people and Britten was very high up on the list. It must have been an amazing time. I've just checked out the window at Aldeburgh Margaret...splendid and very inspiring, thank you for mentioning it.
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Dr Mama, I hope you will be AS delighted by the Piper windows as we were and nor had I realised that Plymouth now has a Minster church, designated on the anniversary of the Diocese of Exeter. I too have read MM in all ways, Fast, slow etc and agree it works whichever way you approach it.
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Please do report back if you remember kaggsy, I'd love to know what you make of this book
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