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Deb
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Hello, Thank you for your comment. Congratulations to everyone involved with Mankoushit Mariam [The Mankoushit ‘Lebanese pizza’ of Mariam]. It's a terrific book and we look forward to sharing it with others. The Toronto Public Library tries, wherever possible, to purchase copies of the outstanding titles for its circulating collections. In the meantime, I hope you will help us spread the word about your book, the other outstanding titles, and the IBBY reference collection itself, a valuable resource of books for and about young people with disabilities. Thanks again for stopping by and congratulations again! Deb
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Hello Marjorie, Thank you for your comment. I absolutely agree -- there is an amazing range of titles on this year's outstanding list. Thank you, too for helping us get the word out on your website, MirrorsWindowsDoors -- it's a great gathering place for all those interested in diversity in children's books! Yours from the world of books, Deb
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Every two years, the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) chooses outstanding books for and about children and young people with disabilities.This biennial selection draws attention to books published around the world, in an extensive variety of languages and formats, that address special needs and situations and which encourage inclusion at every level. The 2017 Outstanding titles have been selected. Learn more here! Continue reading
Posted Mar 20, 2017 at North York Central Library Blog
Your post is a timely one with lots of useful information -- thank you for that! One of the books you mention, "And Tango Makes Three" is an especially good one for young children and their parents and/or caregivers to share together. Its simple yet engaging narrative conveys the important point that families come in many shapes and configurations. Caring for others, treating them with respect and accepting differences are important values that we all need to embrace, now more than ever ...
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Hello Katherine, Thanks for stopping by and commenting. I appreciate your kind words. It's always great to meet someone else out there who is from that larger group I think of as my tribe! With best wishes, Deb
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My good friend, Laleh, is from Iran and every time I go to the library I see someone who reminds me of Laleh -- someone with dark wavy hair and olive skin that never looks pale or washed out even in the middle of a sun-deprived Canadian winter, someone with a gracious manner and a ready smile. It’s easy to want to be more like someone else, and all I can say is that’s true for me with Laleh. Continue reading
Posted Dec 28, 2015 at North York Central Library Blog
Thank you for highlighting the book "Window." You are right: its simple focus and interesting choice of perspective pull readers in and carry them through the narrative. Baker's book is certainly one of many noteworthy examples out there of wordless storytelling. I'm looking forward to covering other examples in an upcoming blog post! Thank you again for taking the time to comment, Deb
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Hello Jennifer, Thank you for taking the time to comment, and for your kind words. I loved reading your anecdote about the young man in Italy and appreciated your candor. I think that many of us have been in your shoes -- not sure whether or not to take the words of a stranger at face value. How interesting that it all had to do with the little island of Lampedusa! Thank you again for stopping by and for sharing your thoughts, Deb
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In recognition of the transformative role of books in the lives of children and young people, The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) is working to establish Lampedusa's first children's library. To build the library's collection, the Italian section of IBBY has gathered outstanding wordless picture books from 23 countries. To showcase the library, an exhibit of more than 100 renowned wordless picture books, called "Silent Books: Final Destination Lampedusa" has been on tour around the world. After stops in Italy, Mexico and Austria, the exhibit travelled to Edmonton and Vancouver. And from November 2nd to December 11th, this exhibit will be at North York Central Library. Continue reading
Posted Oct 23, 2015 at North York Central Library Blog
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One of the terrific things about working with The IBBY Collection of Books for Young People with Disabilities is the sense of community and connection that comes from looking at books that have been published around the world, all of them for and about children and teens with disabilities. There... Continue reading
Posted Sep 25, 2015 at North York Central Library Blog
Hello Jessica, Thanks for an interesting post. I am a bit confused -- what do you mean when you say that Tomi Ungerer is "the opposite of what a children's picture book author should be"? I don't have any sense that a children's author "should" be any particular way ... would it be possible for you to expand on this a bit? With thanks, Deb
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Every spring in Italy, in a vast indoor space that rivals the size of the Colosseum, the Bologna Children’s Book Fair brings together thousands of people with a passion for children’s publishing. This year’s fair, which begins on March 30, 2015 and runs for four action-packed days, is hosting writers,... Continue reading
Posted Mar 30, 2015 at North York Central Library Blog
Hello Elvira, Thanks so much for the update on Ajja & Bajja (Pippa & Boo.) We look forward to seeing more of those two characters and know that they will have a devoted following in whatever languages they are in! With best wishes, Deb
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Hello Claire, Thanks so much for your comment -- yes, this is a terrific list and it would be great to see all of the books available in English. We understand that Lola e io [Lola and I], one of the Italian language books, will be published in North America in English -- very good news for those of us who like this book! I am also glad to hear that you have ordered Writing with Grace -- it's beautifully written and very thought-provoking. Happy reading and thanks for stopping by, Deb
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Every two years, the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) chooses outstanding books for and about children and young people with disabilities. This biennial selection draws attention to books published around the world, in an extensive variety of languages and formats, that address special needs and situations, and which encourage inclusion at every level. For this year’s outstanding selection, 159 books from 27 countries -- including Russia, Australia, the Slovak Republic and China -- were submitted. Of these books, 50 were chosen as outstanding works. Continue reading
Posted Mar 11, 2015 at North York Central Library Blog
Hello Tina, Thank you for getting in touch with us. I'm delighted to hear that you would like to visit our collection and learn more about it. It's a wonderful resource! The collection is available to the public and it's not necessary to book a time to see it. However, in your case, I do suggest making an appointment with IBBY staff so that we can address your specific questions and highlight the parts of the collection that are most relevant to your needs. This is a service we are pleased to offer to anyone who needs it. To book an appointment, please email us at: ibby@torontopubliclibrary.ca We look forward to hearing back from you! Deb
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Hi Fran, Thanks for stopping by and asking about this terrific resource. I want to make sure that I understand your question ... Are you asking specifically about books featuring children with disabilities? All of the books in the collection are either for or about children and teens with disabilities. If you can let me know a bit more about what you might be interested in, Leigh (the librarian in charge of the collection) and I will be pleased to help you! Deb
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The full name of this one-of-a-kind resource is "The IBBY Collection of Books for Young People with Disabilities" but there are other words that best describe this collection: "Amazing!" "Fantastic!" and, yes, "Wow!" The IBBY collection features more than 3000 multilingual books in sign language, Braille, Blissymbolics, as well as cloth and tactile books and other formats -- all for and about children and teens with disabilities. What's so special about this collection? And why should you see it for yourself? Here are three reasons to come and explore these books ... Continue reading
Posted Mar 8, 2014 at North York Central Library Blog
Hi Maureen, Thanks for your comment. Like you, I was surprised (and delighted) to discover the music for Goodnight Moon. The words may have come quickly to Margaret Wise Brown (without, one assumes, the aid of any opium-like substances) but the book's illustrations (by Clement Hurd) took the better part of a year for Hurd to complete. He started off with human figures then, finally, settled on the bunny characters we are all so familiar with. Thanks again for stopping by! Deb
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Back in 1945, when children's author Margaret Wise Brown woke up and wrote down the words to a book that had come to her in a dream, no one imagined that this book, first called "Goodnight Room", would become a classic loved by generations of children around the world. Today,... Continue reading
Posted Jan 15, 2014 at North York Central Library Blog
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If C is for Culture and D is for Days, then E is for Everyone (can participate!) Please join us at North York Central Library on Saturday, Sept. 28th at 2 pm for an interactive production by Red Bear Collective featuring First Nations storytelling, music and dance. Find out what... Continue reading
Posted Sep 16, 2013 at North York Central Library Blog
Hello Donna, Thanks for stopping by and adding a comment. I'm glad to hear that you thought this post was a good one. Yours from the world of children and books, Not Quite Miss Rumphius
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Hi Maureen, Thanks for another terrific post. It's always great to have a chance to talk about writing. Two of my favorite books about writing are: Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott. I re-read this one periodically and love the author's quirky, humorous, and self-deprecating look at (as she notes in the subtitle) both writing and life. I love her other books, too. The Courage to Write: How Writers Transcend Fear by Ralph Keyes. This is another title I return to again and again. Recently, I had the good fortune to read two other excellent books on writing. One is called Writing From the Inside Out by Dennis Palumbo and the other is Unless It Moves the Human Heart by Roger Rosenblatt. Yours in books and writing, Not Quite Miss Rumphius
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I'm Not Quite Miss Rumphius and this is the blog for the Children's Department at North York Central Library. Welcome back. * * * * * * Becoming a new parent means entering the fantastical world of teeny, tiny things. There's your baby, of course, a darling little handful and... Continue reading
Posted Feb 3, 2013 at North York Central Library Blog
Hello Maureen, There's something here for everyone who loves The Hobbit -- and who would have thought that Leonard Nimoy would be part of the wealth of Hobbit-related lore out there? Thanks for sharing some terrific stuff with us! Not Quite Miss Rumphius
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