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Don Penven
Youngsville, NC
Recent Activity
by M/Sgt Hayden B. Baldwin, Retired Illinois State Police In the endeavor of completing a work task certain criteria to complete the work task is needed. Crime scene processing is no different in that respect than to other work related tasks such as exchanging a motor in a car, painting... Continue reading
Posted Dec 8, 2010 at Crime Scene Training
The interpretation of blood spatter was first mentioned in a paper written in the 1890s by a researcher at the Institute for Forensic Medicine in Poland, Dr. Eduard Piotrowski. His work, "Concerning the Origin, Shape, Direction and Distribution of the Bloodstains Following Head Wounds Caused by Blows." But it took... Continue reading
Posted Dec 8, 2010 at Crime Scene Training
In Part 1 of this series we offered a description of what a latent print is, and an overview of latent print processing methods. This article will explain the various types of powders used to develop latent prints and their specific uses. One of the first known methods for developing... Continue reading
Posted Dec 8, 2010 at Crime Scene Training
First a basic explanation: 1. A latent fingerprint is one that is generally not visible unless it is treated in some manner. The print itself is composed of moisture—mostly water—but it also contains small amounts of the constituents of perspiration (sweat), like amino acids, choline, sodium and potassium salts and... Continue reading
Posted Dec 8, 2010 at Crime Scene Training
The wildly popular TV show, “CSI-Crime Scene Investigation” has changed the public’s view on how crimes are investigated and solved. In a sense this show has accomplished two points: 1. It has given the public first hand information about the tools and procedures that crime scene investigators use to solve... Continue reading
Posted Dec 8, 2010 at Crime Scene Training
by M/Sgt Hayden B. Baldwin, Retired Illinois State Police The reconstruction of crime scenes is a miss-nomenclature. You are in reality interpreting the information that you find by examining and processing the scene for evidence. This evidence will then permit you to make factual statements in regards to your findings.... Continue reading
Posted Dec 8, 2010 at Crime Scene Training
Blood Spatter and Newton's Third Law It's the little details that trip up the criminal every time. Dr. Doug Hanson DR. DOUG HANSON dougmh@comcast.netdougmh@comcast.net Forensics Contributor Officer.com Dr. Tom Harper thought he had committed the perfect crime. He had shot his wife in a manner that should have left the... Continue reading
Posted Dec 8, 2010 at Crime Scene Training
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Thank you for visiting us. The intent of this blog is to provide the most comprehensive, up-to-date training in crime scene investigation available on the Internet today. Present plans include our making at least one post per week. Once we are up and running, and the interest is there, we... Continue reading
Posted Dec 6, 2010 at Crime Scene Training
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Aug 18, 2010