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John Whitehead
Boone, NC
Recent Activity
Today: While few outside of Texas and North Dakota are complaining about this huge savings that consumers have enjoyed since energy prices began falling last summer, economists have been stumped recently trying to figure out exactly what consumers are doing with the windfall. They have not gone on a shopping... Continue reading
Reblogged yesterday at Environmental Economics
Numbers. I can't resist: On Tuesday, the residents of Hermosa Beach are going to vote yet again on an oil and gas drilling initiative — whether to allow a contract with the energy company E&B Natural Resources Management to proceed despite a current drilling ban. The contract, which could mean... Continue reading
Reblogged yesterday at Environmental Economics
The CBO doesn't think that implementing the changes propossed by this legislation would cost very much: H.R. 1029 would require the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to make various changes related to the qualifications of members serving on the Science Advisory Board (SAB) and to expand disclosure requirements for members of... Continue reading
Reblogged 2 days ago at Environmental Economics
Here is the conclusion: So there are good reasons for the economists hired by Congress to pursue dynamic scoring. But there are also good reasons to be wary of the endeavor. via www.nytimes.com Congress now requires the CBO to use dynamic scoring when assessing their proposals. Dynamic scoring allows the... Continue reading
Reblogged 3 days ago at Environmental Economics
Zhongmin Wang: In a new RFF discussion paper, “Egregiousness and Boycott intensity: Evidence from the BP Deepwater Horizon Spill,” we ... explore the relationship between boycott intensity and media coverage, due to the latter’s ability to influence consumer awareness about egregious events. In order to test our model empirically, we... Continue reading
Reblogged 5 days ago at Environmental Economics
I'd like to know too: A Democratic member of Congress is digging into the funding of a handful of researchers who have questioned the prevailing view on the causes of climate change, The Washington Post reports. Arizona’s Raul M. Grijalva, the top Democrat on the House of Representatives’ Committee on... Continue reading
Reblogged 6 days ago at Environmental Economics
Christian Neumann, Linwood Pendleton, Marianne Kettunen and Tundi Agardy: The value of ecosystems and the associated services they provide is receiving growing attention both in the public and decision-making arena. The language of Ecosystem Services essentially translates the complexity of ecological processes and functions into descriptors that define the socio-economic-ecological... Continue reading
Reblogged 6 days ago at Environmental Economics
The guardian of academic integrity or something? I should blissfully enjoy being snowed in and not having to teach negative externality in an 8 am micro class. From the inbox: Classes that begin before 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 26, are canceled. Classes that begin at 12:30 p.m. and later... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Environmental Economics
Something to do at lunch time: RFF Seminar Date February 25, 2015 12:45–2:00 p.m. EST A light lunch will be provided starting at 12:30 p.m. Location RFF First Floor Conference Center 1616 P Street NW, Washington, DC Registration Seating is limited and provided on a first come, first served basis.... Continue reading
Reblogged 7 days ago at Environmental Economics
Phil Miller: The American Economic Association now has JEL classification codes for Sports Economics and subareas within the field. Here are the codes: Z2 - Sports Economics Z20 - General Z21 - Industry Studies Z22 - Labor Issues Z23 - Finance Z28 - Policy Z29 - Other In an email... Continue reading
Reblogged 7 days ago at Environmental Economics
I agree that an entrance fee is a drop in the bucket. But, that still does not get in the way of the fact that many don't see it that way. I stand by what I wrote: "At some point, the National Park Service decided that everyone should get a chance to visit the most popular parks." Somehow I remembered that I had read something like this in graduate school (in the dusty government documents section): "Throughout the history of the System, there have been differences of opinion--often sharp--as to how these expenses should be borne. One side has held that admission to the parks and the use of most park facilities and services should generally be without specific charge to the visiting public, which is to say that the full cost of the parks should be paid by the general taxpayer. The other side has argued that people actually using the parks should pay, through entrance and user fees,* a proportionately greater share than the public at large. In recent times few have contended either that the parks should be entirely supported by their users or that all park facilities, such as developed campsites, should be "free"; the issue has narrowed for the most part to whether and where entrance fees should be levied and how much should be charged for both park entry and use of developed facilities." This is interesting too: "In 1976 the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (BOR) commissioned Economic Research Associates to conduct a study of the public's willingness to pay user charges for recreation facilities. ... The contracted firm surveyed 800 households representing varying ages, incomes, educational levels, and geographic areas. Its report revealed that a majority of all demographic groups favored the user fee concept as opposed to total reliance on general tax revenues, and that most people were willing to pay higher fees than were then in effect. Interestingly, opposition to user fees on the grounds that they deterred lower-income participation came more from higher income and education levels; those of lower income and education, who did patronize recreation facilities less, expressed the greatest support for fees."
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From the inbox: All classes that meet before 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24, are now cancelled. Classes that meet at 2 p.m. and later will meet as scheduled. If this decision changes, notification will be sent by noon. The adverse weather policy is in effect for staff employees, as follows:... Continue reading
Posted Feb 24, 2015 at Environmental Economics
Professor Krugman: Lots of new music I intend to feature soon. But the wonders of online video mean that I also get to watch old live performances, including by bands that I was oblivious about at the time. And here’s the ultimate complain about the weather song, more or less... Continue reading
Reblogged Feb 24, 2015 at Environmental Economics
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I'm teaching sophomore level environmental and resource economics (with no prerequisite). We just finished covering the principles level negative externality market model. Here is the problem set: Consider the following model: Qd=200-20P Qs=20P MEC=2 MSC=MPC+MEC At the unregulated (inefficient) private market equilibrium : What is the consumer surplus? What is... Continue reading
Posted Feb 24, 2015 at Environmental Economics
From The Hill's Overnight Energy and Environment email: Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and the rest of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee will get a chance Tuesday to challenge Interior Secretary Sally Jewell on her department's budget request for fiscal year 2016. Jewell will be the sole witness at the... Continue reading
Reblogged Feb 24, 2015 at Environmental Economics
Joe Nocera in the NY Times: “The basic story is that all professional leagues try to have fewer teams than the number of locations that would like to have them,” says Roger Noll, a sports economist at Stanford University. “That is what monopolists do — contrive scarcity to drive up... Continue reading
Posted Feb 21, 2015 at Environmental Economics
Dan Petrolia: This paper outlines what we have learned about the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil disaster from the economics discipline as well as what effect the DWH disaster has had on the economics discipline. It appears that what we know about the economic impact of the DWH... Continue reading
Reblogged Feb 20, 2015 at Environmental Economics
@Noahpinion for environmental econ its @john_env_econ, @tim_env_econ and @mattkahn1966 — Toni Sipic (@ToniSipic) February 18, 2015 Continue reading
Posted Feb 18, 2015 at Environmental Economics
Severin Borenstein: Renewable energy proponents and advocates of the Keystone pipeline finally agree on something: that the right way to count “job creation” is to focus narrowly on the jobs in the industry they want to boost and ignore the overall impact on employment. Unfortunately, researchers who actually study employment... Continue reading
Posted Feb 18, 2015 at Environmental Economics
Sorry, the links aren't working. I'll try to get those fixed.
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Common Resources: A “strong majority” of people from the New York Times/RFF/Stanford University poll also indicated that while they worry about climate change and support government regulation, they oppose increasing gasoline taxes or electricity prices. The article questions “just how much they might be willing to pay” to reduce the... Continue reading
Reblogged Feb 18, 2015 at Environmental Economics
Sweet, this tweet was favorited by Christian Zimmerman!
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Economics Job Market Rumors continues to give Appstate some serious props: Economist 83dc Which strange schools are strong in a niche field? ex: Wyoming - Environmental Economics George Mason - Law and Economics 2 months ago # QUOTE 0 GOOD 2 NO GIOD P ! Economist 8f85 Appalachian State -... Continue reading
Posted Feb 17, 2015 at Environmental Economics
And still, my rankings go nowhere: The professor at the heart of a rankings scandal at the University of Missouri at Kansas City’s Henry W. Bloch School of Management has resigned, The Kansas City Star reported. The controversy centers on an innovation-management program that the professor, Michael Song, founded in... Continue reading
Posted Feb 17, 2015 at Environmental Economics