This is Emma Darwin's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Emma Darwin's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Emma Darwin
I write novels and short fiction and I live in South East London.
Interests: fiction, creative non-fiction, novels, short fiction, short stories, historical fiction, academic writing, writing, reading, editing, teaching
Recent Activity
Glad it's useful, Christopher! I hope it's coming clear now.
1 reply
So glad to hear it helped, Joy, and very best of luck with those next few months!
1 reply
You're welcome, Kate - good luck with the deliberation!
1 reply
Oh, that sounds interesting - almost a non-fiction thread, standing separately rather than trying to be integrated into the story, which is often difficult and potentially clunky.
1 reply
Oh, Paul, thank you! I'd forgotten about The Night Watch, and it's an excellent example. Best of luck with the new novel - like all the best projects, it sounds as challenging as it sounds exciting. And thanks for sharing!
1 reply
Brilliant! Thank you!
1 reply
So glad it helps, Maggie. I sounds like a great project - good luck with it!
1 reply
VERY interesting - and yes, I'm sure that's true. And it's a feeling that historical fictioneers maybe particularly often feel: that all these other worlds are going on in parallel with ours, just the other side of a very thin veil. We could easily get the mixed up.
1 reply
Whisks, many thanks for the TTTW reference - that's a great example. And yes, if it's well-enough written and engaging enough, you might happily just go along with it and not worry if you don't quite get the exact details and mechanisms.
1 reply
Lesley, you're welcome! Good luck with bending your timelines in the future...
1 reply
Once upon a time, there were only stories which were about a single person, and they started at the beginning, proceeded by way of a middle stretch of causally linked events, through to the end. Then someone invented the word "meanwhile", and it became possible to tell a story in which that chain of events was partly formed or changed by what was happening or had happened to someone else and in a different place; the story began to step sideways, so as to draw this new set of causal relationships into the main chain of cause-and-effect. As readers and... Continue reading
Posted Apr 11, 2017 at This Itch of Writing: the blog
16
Good luck! And see you at York.
1 reply
Jane, you could try different ways of working on a short piece which you don't have too much riding on. But I think each of us just has to accept that what is - ultimately, testedly - the right process for us will, inevitably, have its drawbacks. And then do one's best to compensate for those, but also make one's peace with what one will never therefore write. Also, different forms and different genres may suit different processes. I know someone who was a "get every page perfect before you move on" short story writer, who only began to be able to write novels after she did NaNoWriMo, and discovered the advantages of the hell-for-leather shitty first draft - but she's an all-or-nothing type in life too. And both her short and her long fiction are good! And I'm sure there are people who plan their crime fiction, say, but dive into a love story, whose mechanics can be simpler and more straightforward, and splash happily about.
1 reply
Stacy, you're welcome. Very bst of luck with it!
1 reply
"keeps flinging tentacles out to grab at other ideas." Do we sense an Octopus - or at least squid - theme emerging? I remember likening the commentary on my PhD as trying to gift-wrap a porcupine: every time I thought I'd got it safely packaged, a spine would come slashing out through the paper and point in a new direction ... Good luck! And thank you for mentioning post-its - I'd forgotten them as an alternative to index cards, and have amended the post to suit!
1 reply
Jennifer, I'm VERY impressed that the Daily Page is still going strong, and I'm so glad the posts are helpful. I'll hope to pop over to your blog when I get a minute.
1 reply
Ah, yes, three-parters ... Lots and lots of grids and charts and synopses, I would imagine. Glad it's well-timed for you, and I hope it all helps.
1 reply
"a giant squid having a tantrum in a box of cornflakes," Oh, Deborah, that made me hoot with rueful laughter! SO how it feels. Glad to know that some of my suggestions would have made sense to you, and good luck with the (slightly less flail-y) next stage.
1 reply
Frances, you're welcome! Best of luck - and hope to see you at Words Away on Monday. It's going to be a good'un.
1 reply
I'm so glad the post is useful, Patricia - and best of luck with it!
1 reply
Lucy, you're so welcome! Delighted it's being so useful - and yes, novels do need confidence, don't they, to sustain one. I shall be at York this year, and it'll be great to say Hi in person. On editorial services, there's always Writers Workshop, and The Literary Consultancy are the other long-established service. If you want to go direct, you could also search the site of the Society of Editors and Proof-readers database of professionals: https://www.sfep.org.uk/directory Reedsy is a website designed to team up writers with all the professionals who offer editorial and publishing services: https://reedsy.com/
1 reply
Hi Katherine - sorry to take a while to get back to you 0 I usually use italics for dialogue which is remembered, rather than actually being said out loud, and fended off copy-editors who want to put it in speech marks. But that does assume you're not using italics for too many other things, of course.
1 reply
Christian - that's such a great idea! I think prose-writers would do well to look at the improv- and devising games that theatre writers and actors get up to, and draw on that - with or without the friends and the pub - to catch that sense of letting a story spin out where it will...
1 reply
Yes, social media cuts both ways, doesn't it - I think one has to have the courage to be selective about it, as you have, Sally. But that does also mean recognising the consequences of one's choices: it's no good self-pubbing, ignoring Twitter, and then being baffled that you're not selling any books!
1 reply
You're welcome, Anita! I thought it was great.
1 reply