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Ed Bruske
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Colin, we've been getting a little too much rain this spring. But that's part of the cycle, too. Be sure to dig plenty of organic matter (compost) into your soil for moisure retention and mulch your plantings to hold moisture and reduce the need for watering. You may not have to water at all.
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Juliet, I believe there is a sustainable future for livestock raised on pasture in a localized agricultural setting. Including beef. Properly raised, red meat builds strong bodies at least 12 different ways.
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Hi, Lisa. Thanks for such a lengthy response. It may be time to brush up on your science. Everything you said is wrong. But a detailed response would take a book. Fortunately, there is such a book. You might start by reading "Good Calories, Bad Calories," by Gary Taubes, perhaps the most thorough document ever assembled on the current state of science behind fats and carbohydrates. Here's a link: http://www.amazon.com/Good-Calories-Bad-Controversial-Science/dp/1400033462/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1243685984&sr=1-1
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Colin, beef is one of the most nutritious foods we have at our disposal. Over 2.6 million years of evolution, humans evolved to eat primarily a diet of red meat and fat. There is no scientific basis to believe red meat or fat are harmful (in fact,the best studies ever done indicated that a diet rich in saturated fat actually help reduce weight and LDL cholesterol). Unfortunately, demonizing red meat only encourages people to eat more carbohydrates (plant-based calories) which prompts the insulin response that we now know is behind an epidemic of obesity, hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis. What we should be encouraging is more healthy meat and fats by raising beef sustainably on pasture. If you want to reduce carbon emissions, dith your car and take public transportation, stop using electricity from coal-fired power plants, protest deforestation of the Amazon.
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One of the first rules of gardening is, plant things that are appropriate for the site. Usually that means planting things that will do well, so that you aren't constantly chasing after pests and diseases. But I think this general rul also applies to your tree: it doesn't belong in the community garden plot. It needs to go. Feel free to grieve. However, your vegetables will be very thankful. And not to worry. When the humans are gone, the trees will come back and reclaim their old territory.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2009 on Environmental conundrum at No Impact Man
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In fact, the best science reveals that the cause of obesity, hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis (the so-called diseases of civilization, or Syndrome X) is over-consumption of carbohydrates resulting in too much insulin and insulin resistance. There are only two macronutrients required for human health: protein and fat. Stick to a diet high in protein, reduce your carbs--especially from starchy foods, frined flours, sugars, polished grains--and your chances of staying slim and disease free will be much greater. And yes, carbohydrates are known to have an addictive quality. It's not nearly as complicated as Kessler makes it out to be. He should know better.
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Jean, thanks for inviting me over to comment. While it is certainly true that fewer calories in and more out will result in weight loss, where the calories come from also is extremely important. There are good health reasons to reduce carbohydrates and lower insulin levels as well as increase protein intake for all the nutritional benefits that proteins contain. While Michael Pollan's advise is certainly trendy and politically correct where the environment is concerned, it's pretty simplistic and not the best advice from a health point of view.
Toggle Commented Mar 4, 2009 on How to Lose Weight at Mindful Eats
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an old potato ricer,purchased at a flea market in Maine. makes silken mashed potatoes
Commented Mar 2, 2009 on Good Stuff at A Hunger Artist
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