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Just to add that I'll (hello) also be posting reviews to my own blog. I have an RSS feed, but if you just want the Whoniverse, bookmark this page: http://feelinglistless.blogspot.com/search/label/doctor%20who I've just finished reviewing the Eccleston era again, or at least the episodes I didn't get to here the first time around. Which was most of them.
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Agreed. But I think one of the aspects of new Who borrowed from the Whedonverse is the (general) ability to produce characters which could be at the centre of their own series without much shiftying about. I'm still desperate to see the "Mickey and Martha: Bounty Hunters!"
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"Who played Doctor Who for the longest period?" If we're being really pedantic all of the answer were wrong. Those four played "The Doctor". The only actor to play Doctor Who on screen was Peter Cushing.
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Too true Allyn. Plus the reference was made in a novel which was published well after Virgin books had lost the license to produce official Doctor Who fiction and everything was being done surreptitiously anyway. So it's there if you want to believe it (and I do like the idea of the Doctor having a proper family rather than being loomed or whatever) but ignorable if that's not your thing. I haven't really followed Big Finish much other than the Eighth Doctor and the Gallifrey plays, as you say because it's so expensive. Since the show came back, there are so many releases that you could easily spend sixty pounds a month to obtain everything. And that's before you've even considered whatever BBC Audio are doing and factored in the dvds of the classic episodes. As ever, I think that they'd probably make more if they reduced their prices on the assumption that more people would buy more of them.
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Doctor Who was associated with fantasy and fairy tales the moment Barbara entered a box that was bigger on the inside that travelled through time. Under the stricter rules of genre anyway, Doctor Who is a sub-genre unto itself now. And if plotholes and logic aren't your thing, don't watch Doctor Who because its never been internally consistent. It's always made things up as it goes along. That's how it has managed to survive for nearly fifty years.
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Thank you! It's people like you who make me think that the hollow scream into the dark which usually greets the end of my first paragraph each week when I realise I don't know what to write next is worth the pain.
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Thanks very much! But don't forget Sarah Jane Adventures. And the next series of Torchwood. And the Eighth Doctor audios once I have a complete run sorted out ...
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When characters within Moffat's script have asked similar questions, the best the Doctor and for that matter Moffat himself can come up with is that it's "wibbly wobbly timey whimey".
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@Charlesdecant Welcome to the scary world of predestination paradoxes http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination_paradox
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Stephen FRY says he was misquoted so the jury's out on that. Oddly enough I've just watched it again. Just after they find the Pandorica, the Doctor says that Stonehenge is broadcasting and that anyone and everyone can hear it including poor Vincent. We know from his conversation with Amy that the artist is sensitive to these things so it makes a kind of sense that he'd be able to pick it up and River sent the rendezvous message based on the info on the canvas. Which is a predestination paradox but hey-ho the show hasn't been averse to them this year. I can't find anyone who doesn't this whole season won't turn out to be another rather long and convoluted one of those. I think that when the Doctor entered the chamber, a proximity system looking for his genetic makeup (which we know the Daleks have at least because they've used it before to check his identity even after he's regenerated) firstly activated the Pandorica which then begins its unlocking process and then sent a message to all in sundry to let them know that the Doctor is in place and to hightale it to Earth at that moment in order to complete the plan.
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As ever, Neil says everything I wanted to in half as many words.
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Plus Moffat likes his predestination paradoxes -- all of his scripts have had one.
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Yes, but there's much said in the series about how the TARDIS is everything to the Doctor. In The Impossible Planet there's all that talk about settling down now that the time machine has gone. But if time travel is so easy that it can be done using a "space hopper" losing the Tardis is as inconvenient as losing your house or a sports car which lessens its potency somehow.
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Yes, I know it's not a time ring. I was being facetious -- similar narrative function etc. But you do have to question the Doctor requiring a TARDIS to fly about with when something that fits on your arm can do much the same thing (albeit more painfully!). I hadn't noticed that she'd taken it off though. Thanks for that.
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David & Mos89: If she can buy a time ring in a bar, there's nothing to stop River from dropping back or forwards into her own timeline and being mistaken, purposefully or otherwise, with an older or younger version of herself.
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Three comments and yet no one has picked up on this. Related by marriage to Patrick Stewart?!?
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Not buying into the assumption I had whilst watching the episode that the Doctor was accentuating his eccentricity/unpredictability to give something Craig to bang up against *and* throw him off the scent of what he was really doing? Of course he knows about football. He's just pretending not to so that Craig feels like an even bigger twat. To me, the Doctor has always been rather like his TARDIS. There's the real him, the God-like figure, and then there's the act, the front and sometimes he uses that front to his advantage to catch people off guard. In other words -- as I've discovered -- the best way to get away with doing some very silly things is to pretend to be silly in general -- and the Doctor is a good enough actor that its sometimes impossible to see the different. Look at Matt Smith's performance, especially in the closing moments when he's leaving. He's walking upright, has an entirely serious face on. He's sneaking away. But as soon as Craig notices him, the act returns. He likes being that clown. He'll even do it when he's not in company. It helps him to balance. But the man who walked away from Bowie Base, the look in those eyes, the one who fell off the pylon in Logopolis. That's the real Doctor. Why did he let those people die? Horrible as it may seem, perhaps he understood that for web of time reasons they had to. Icky, isn't it? God, I love this show.
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On the pronunciation of Van Gogh: I just assumed we were witnessing the TARDIS's translation circuits attempt to deal with it.
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Don't worry, Simon, I took your poultry criticism on board. Perhaps its just that "chicken" strikes me as being a funnier word than "turkey".
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The Science Pundit: Yes, indeed, I meant his cover version. But I've gone in and made it clearer. Matthew: It's not that I didn't like Vincent and Amy's romance -- I did -- it was lovely -- I was just commenting on the fact that it seemed to have have been somewhat sacrificed in the edit.
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SDGlyph: To be fair I didn't say which companion ... but point taken.
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David: They were drilling just to see how far they could get.
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Oh yes. I know it gives a lot of people a great deal of happiness but there are just too few hours in the day.
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Dita Svelte: I agree that Amy has been a bit weightless in relation to characterisation lately (lately in this case being every episode since The Beast Below). The problem is that she's rarely shown in relation to another character just talking about life in general. There are few scenes of characters just getting to know each other. There's a bit of it in Vampires of Venice, but we've certainly seen nothing like the domestic scenes in the RTD years. We don't know much more about Amy and her family than we found out in TEH. Apparently it has been a conscious decision to move back towards the classic approach where (at least in later years) subplots were always offshoots of the main story rather than character beats. BUT and this is a big BUT I'm still hoping/assuming that there are all reasons for this, that the Doctor is playing for time, that it's all connected to why Amy's (and perhaps Rory's) brain seems to be made of swiss cheese and that the closing few episodes will be filled with connecting tissue.
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Yes, it is. Of course it is. Which is why I came back to it in the final paragraph. Or thought I had. And have now.
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