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George Mccasland
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The writers really screwed up by missing out of several potential video clips for jokes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aataTbxlWeM&feature=player_detailpage#t=9s
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Letter to the Meg Whitman, HP CEO From: George McCasland Date: Wed, May 23, 2012 at 6:33 PM Subject: Announced Layoffs To: Meg Whitman Dear Ms. Whitman, Dads House has free information that will be needed by many of those facing a layoff from your company. I would like to suggest that HP send out a notification to all those people being laid off that if they have a child support obligation, they can get help from their state to have the order modified. That they need to make the official request the moment they have been notified they are listed for release, as it can take up to a year to get a hearing. This is a right they have under the 1988 Child Support Enforcement Act, and is detailed in the Federal Child Support Enforcement Handbook for Non-Custodial Parents. Unfortunately, the states refuse to distribute the handbook, which is free from the feds. Here is the material from it. http://ChildSupportRights.org If you are willing, here is a small poster that can be displayed in the employee break rooms with the above link. http://dadshousedocs.org/ChildSupportRightsAD.pdf I hope you will consider my request, and perhaps have one of your assitants respond to confirm you have received it. You are experiencing some public relations issues right now with this decision, and this might help it. George R. McCasland, National Moderator Dads House Educational Center & Groups http://DadsHouseEdCtr.org Postscript: Took me a while to find a contact address, and I cc'd it to their Craig Gomez, Media Relations VP, as a backup.
First, the question that should be asked is whether he did it because was the aggressor in the domestic violence incident, or was she, and whether a female officer was dispatched to hear her story. A good example of why can be found on a 2005 episode of COPS. In it, two male San Antonio (TX) police officers arrive on a domestic violence call. When they arrived, they found the man sitting outside the house, claiming he never even went inside the house. When the officers went inside, they found a very upset woman who said he had grabbed her by the arms and neck. She had the hand shaped bruises to prove it. The officers than went outside to place the man under arrest, just as a female officer arrived. She also went in to talk to the woman. When she came out, she informed the other officers that the hand shaped bruises were more the size and shape of the woman’s own hands, so she went to talk to the neighbors. They told her that the woman, and not the man, was the abusive one. At this point, they released the man, but informed him that the county prosecutor could still charge him, as arrests are mandatory in Texas whenever a woman makes a domestic violence claim. The female officer saw through the tears of the woman and saw the truth. In my 21 years of working with men, I’ve seen it repeatedly that when a female officer is on the scene, where a false allegation may be in play, she is the one to see it. In 1994, when Kansas passed its mandatory arrest law, something interesting happened in the City of Lawrence, a University town about 40 miles from Kansas City. Over 50% of the ones arrested for domestic violence were women. The women’s shelters protested this, saying the officers were poorly trained in knowing who the real abuser is. However, whereas the national average for female officers is just 13%, in Lawrence it was nearly 40%, with them making most of the arrests. Talking with female officers, they tell me that they do see a lot more than the male officers do, including the evidence of male officers who are themselves victims. He may have been the victim, but it is common when the male is the victim, he is the one arrested, as in this case involving a sheriff deputy. Also, a man his size is not going to leave minor injuries. A woman doing ti to herself would. http://A-Daughters-Story-Of-Abuse.dads-house.org Male Victims of Domestic Violence Logo http://Speak-No-Truths.dads-house.org Domestic Abuse Helpline for Men and Women http://DAHMW-FaceBook.waits4u.com
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First, the question that should be asked is whether he did it because was the aggressor in the domestic violence incident, or was she, and whether a female officer was dispatched to hear her story. A good example of why can be found on a 2005 episode of COPS. In it, two male San Antonio (TX) police officers arrive on a domestic violence call. When they arrived, they found the man sitting outside the house, claiming he never even went inside the house. When the officers went inside, they found a very upset woman who said he had grabbed her by the arms and neck. She had the hand shaped bruises to prove it. The officers than went outside to place the man under arrest, just as a female officer arrived. She also went in to talk to the woman. When she came out, she informed the other officers that the hand shaped bruises were more the size and shape of the woman’s own hands, so she went to talk to the neighbors. They told her that the woman, and not the man, was the abusive one. At this point, they released the man, but informed him that the county prosecutor could still charge him, as arrests are mandatory in Texas whenever a woman makes a domestic violence claim. The female officer saw through the tears of the woman and saw the truth. In my 21 years of working with men, I’ve seen it repeatedly that when a female officer is on the scene, where a false allegation may be in play, she is the one to see it. In 1994, when Kansas passed its mandatory arrest law, something interesting happened in the City of Lawrence, a University town about 40 miles from Kansas City. Over 50% of the ones arrested for domestic violence were women. The women’s shelters protested this, saying the officers were poorly trained in knowing who the real abuser is. However, whereas the national average for female officers is just 13%, in Lawrence it was nearly 40%, with them making most of the arrests. Talking with female officers, they tell me that they do see a lot more than the male officers do, including the evidence of male officers who are themselves victims. He may have been the victim, but it is common when the male is the victim, he is the one arrested, as in this case involving a sheriff deputy. Also, a man his size is not going to leave minor injuries. A woman doing ti to herself would. http://A-Daughters-Story-Of-Abuse.dads-house.org Male Victims of Domestic Violence Logo http://Speak-No-Truths.dads-house.org Domestic Abuse Helpline for Men and Women http://DAHMW-FaceBook.waits4u.com
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Nope, 21 years of working with male victims. Domestic violence against women has gone down by 1% in the last ten years, but violence by women has gone up by 40%. You sound like someone who keeps their ears covered so that they can't hear any Inconvenient Truths. If he had manhandled her, she would not have just superficial bruises, she would have massive bruises.
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First, the question that should be asked is whether he was the aggressor or was she, and whether a female office was dispatched to hear her story. A good example of why can be found on a 2005 episode of COPS. In it, two male San Antonio (TX) police officers arrive on a domestic violence call. When they arrived, they found the man sitting outside the house, claiming he never even went inside the house. When the officers went inside, they found a very upset woman who said he had grabbed her by the arms and neck. She had the hand shaped bruises to prove it. The officers than went outside to place the man under arrest, just as a female officer arrived. She also went in to talk to the woman. When she came out, she informed the other officers that the hand shaped bruises were more the size and shape of the woman’s own hands, so she went to talk to the neighbors. They told her that the woman, and not the man, was the abusive one. At this point, they released the man, but informed him that the county prosecutor could still charge him, as arrests are mandatory in Texas whenever a woman makes a domestic violence claim. The female officer saw through the tears of the woman and saw the truth. In my 21 years of working with men, I’ve seen it repeatedly that when a female officer is on the scene, where a false allegation may be in play, she is the one to see it. In 1994, when Kansas passed its mandatory arrest law, something interesting happened in the City of Lawrence, a University town about 40 miles from Kansas City. Over 50% of the ones arrested for domestic violence were women. The women’s shelters protested this, saying the officers were poorly trained in knowing who the real abuser is. However, whereas the national average for female officers is just 13%, in Lawrence it was nearly 40%, with them making most of the arrests. Talking with female officers, they tell me that they do see a lot more than the male officers do, including the evidence of male officers who are themselves victims. He may have been the victim, but it is common when the male is the victim, he is the one arrested, as in this case involving a sheriff deputy. Also, a man his size is not going to leave minor injuries. A woman doing ti to herself would. http://A-Daughters-Story-Of-Abuse.dads-house.org Male Victims of Domestic Violence Logo http://Speak-No-Truths.dads-house.org Domestic Abuse Helpline for Men and Women http://DAHMW-FaceBook.waits4u.com
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Not knowing his financial problems, I do know that in this economy, this is not uncommon. I wonder if he availed himself of the free legal services available for all ones paying child support in every state? http://Child_Support.Dads-House.org http://Child_Support_Quiz.dads-house.org
Now he should consider making one showing that nearly half the batterers are women. Such as the Major League Baseball Pitcher who was beaten on by his girlfriend, a super model, while driving in their car on a California freeway at the same time it was happening to Rihanna. I guess it male victims don't make all the news. It was just a back page story in the LA Times. Annette's Story: The Other Face Of Domestic Violence http://TheOtherFaceOfDomesticAbuse-Annettes-Story.org
What about the 39% of domestic violence victims who are men? Annette's Story: The Other Face Of Domestic Violence http://TheOtherFaceOfDomesticAbuse-Annettes-Story.org
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Now he should consider making one showing that nearly half the batterers are women. Such as the Major League Baseball Pitcher who was beaten on by his girlfriend, a super model, while driving in their car on a California freeway at the same time it was happening to Rihanna. I guess it male victims don't make all the news. It was just a back page story in the LA Times. Annette's Story: The Other Face Of Domestic Violence http://TheOtherFaceOfDomesticAbuse-Annettes-Story.org
I would like permission to repost this as a page in Annette's Story http://TheOtherFaceOfDomesticAbuse-Annettes-Story.org
Annette's Story: The Other Face Of Domestic Violence http://TheOtherFaceOfDomesticAbuse-Annettes-Story.org
Note she included only one man in the study, whereas 39% of the victims are men. Annette's Story: The Other Face Of Domestic Violence http://TheOtherFaceOfDomesticAbuse-Annettes-Story.org
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It seems to still remain someone else's problem when it comes to the 39% of domestic violence victims who happen to be men. Annette's Story: The Other Face Of Domestic Violence http://TheOtherFaceOfDomesticAbuse-Annettes-Story.org
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Jul 24, 2010