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Gibbon
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I remember taking a summer course where the professor let slip how much an hour she was getting and you could almost hear the thirty engineering students brains comparing what they paid X thirty and her rate by X hours... One of the students said, "we should hire you directly' We were paying roughly per hour of instruction what she was getting per hour. All thirty of us.
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I suspect that the army air force was hampered greatly by errant prewar thinking. 70 years ago for the US the war has been 'on' for less than 30 months. At the start, the air force had access to heavily armored bombers when they needed long range fighters armed with surface to air rockets. Those were not available till summer of 44. That said it seems that they realized fairly quickly they needed different gear and strategy, but were stuck with trying to make due with what they had available. All that said the largest impediment to war effort was the British, Americans, and Soviets didn't fully trust each other.
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Me summer of 1999 I buried a stolen tanker truck full of diesel and a semi trailer full of smokes out in the desert. Plus a 55 gallon drum of Maxwell House Coffee(tm). Come the end times I'm going to own you all.
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Those comments are totally off topic from the get go and not a result of thread drift. Really ought to have not been posted. On the other hand perhaps typepad shit itself.
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Though at this point American submarines are sinking Japanese shipping at a ferocious rate. The Japanese lose half their tonnage in 1944. Unlike the North Atlantic the US Merchant Marine has mostly easy sailing in the Pacific.
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You'd think, missing your rondevu with your fighter escort, would mean switching to a low risk target, like bombing some rail line.
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When I was teenager in the seventies I read in magazine of ill repute an article titled 'getting stuck' with a wonderful graphic of an older guy wearing a sixties style tee shirt and mickey mouse ears. I tried looking it up online, but no luck after 5 minutes of poking. The authors point was the majority of people reach this age where suddenly they 'get stuck' And that's it. They never change after that. They they just get older. You listen to a lot of economists and older people their views on the economy and economics is stuck in the period of 1980-1985. They always think inflation is much higher than it really is because as they get older their time horizon stretches out. Fifteen years ago they bought a weed whacker for $104.99 and now the replacement costs $139.97!!!! Inflation!!! See!!! Not to mention as their finances get better they patronize more upscale restaurants and hotels.
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>Tens of millions of murdered Jews, Polish, Ukrainian, Russians, and other civilians would completely disagree with you. The more I roll this around the more I think of the difference between policy and methods. In war the methods are brutal. At the time, 1940-45 large scale bombing was novel, one could argue back and forth over how effective it could be. I have trouble holding dead men into account for not knowing lessons we've (well some of us) painfully learned over the last 70 years.
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I'm a little unsure about that. For the V2 the Germans used fixed pads first and mobile launchers later. One assumes the switch from fixed pads was due to bombing. Difficulty back then was that aiming was poor at best from mobile sites. So I can certainly see the Germans using fixed launch facilities for the V1. Also at 1:40 you see a fixed launch site. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QY308O42Ur4
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The ying-yang of secrecy, In wartime secrecy is essential. In peacetime (most) secrecy is dangerous. Much better for everyone to know what everyone else's shit for brains leadership is up to.
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Well that's an exercise in scatterbrained over-thinking. And I'm saying that as a childless male. The simple answer is women don't have children in a vacuum. You ramblings ignore two things. Thing One: Men have children too, granted women do bear the physical burden. Since fathers is also liable for various economic costs of pregnancy, female healthcare subsidies' are also subsidies for them as well. Try to tell the hospital that you shouldn't have to pay for your half of the cost of your wife hysterectomy because you yourself don't have a uterus. And as millions of men have discovered the welfare office will go after you for your ex-gf's pregnancy related costs to the point of attaching your wages. Thing Two: 'Female Healthcare' directly benefits these things called children irrespective of whether that they be male or female. And everyone was a child at some point. Thing Three: (Always something more) There are long tail economic benefits to even childless people for healthy children and a population that isn't collapsing. Seriously who exactly is going to change my bed pan in 30 years? Thing Four: There must be a Yiddish word that refers to 'burdens we all must agree to accept because not accepting them is simple immoral shirkitude.'
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I'm betting Stalin would have carried on until the US dropped a nuke on Hitlers bunker. And Stalin very well knew by 43 that was what would happen aprox. summer of 45 unless he got to Berlin first.
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'terminal' That's a word. It doesn't really mean what people think. It means you know what's going to get you. Because no one gets out alive. A out of my butt pop sociology comment is that every generation in history had that pounded into their heads, everyone dies. Not Boomers like Keller though, they drank the 'maybe everyone will live forever coolaid' growing up in the 50-70's. Death makes them uncomfortable.
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"and puts poor folks out of work by imposing a minimum wage." This is one of those things where, everyone and his dog wants to prove this is true but haven't been able to. Personally I suspect it helps landlords (and thus banks) more than Poor People. In short, if one of your tenants can't pay the rent, he has a problem, if none of your tenants can pay the rent, you have a problem. "Obamafood, Obamasex, and Obamamusic on us." I'm pretty sure government distortions of the food market pre-exists Obama's birth. From the strange but true files, liberals don't care where you stick it. There is this thing called youtube, it's amazing.
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>But... why bring up one, when we're discussing the other? They're both a collective violence committed against a community. I think it's reasonable to compare and contrast one with the other. I have an impression that anytime you up root a community, you'll see excess mortality and morbidity, which is just one of a number of reasons not to do things like that. Granted, I don't know the answer, hence the question. You say 50,000 dead during the deportation, Bakho upstairs says 6000. The latter number is a death rate of 6%, since I was going by the latter number it stands to reason to ask what the death rate amount the Japanese Americans was (and certainly it was much lower). I know a lot less about other mass expulsions, the British did that to the Boer's South America, round them up put them in camps and many died of disease. Just a side note that says how complicated such can be, I remember a Japanese family being interviewed maybe 20-30 years ago. They said their grandfather received an award on account of being a civic leader among the Japanese community. During the war he wasn't just interned, but imprisoned. And released much later. Unable to deal with the loss of his reputation and disruption of his previously life he killed himself in the early fifties.
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I've wondered how many frail or otherwise ill Japanese Americans never made it home from internment.
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What's going one with this piece is pretty much smoke and mirrors. Miss Coulter is making the argument: Dear Red Blooded American (AKA low wage white dude who for some inexplicable reason has the right to vote), Liberals think shiftless n*ggers are more deserving of the pittance you earn and want them to have it instead. Liberals then make counter arguments to each other that would make low wage white dudes head hurt if he ever read them. Which he doesn't.
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You go to to war with the bastards you have, not the bastards you want. Also my impression is, Stalin (and Beria) were horrible men, Stalin's generals not so much.
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Not ignoring it, just two things. If you can't find the runway or see the ground, then the plane is going to crash. It'll crash just as well with a crew aboard as not. And offhand reading about airplane crashes in the news off and on for 40 years most of the time no one on the ground biffs it. Modern airliners (much heavier than a Lancaster) when crashing in populated areas take 'a few people' at most.
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Course in California under Prop 13, one now pass your Prop 13 tax benefit to your heirs as well. Better, property isn't revalued for tax purposes due to corporate sales, mergers, and spinoffs either. That should allow the smart and wealthy to sell control of properties without losing their property tax boon.
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I've seen clips of specially equipped airfields with a row burners on each side for dispersing fog. Though have no idea of they were in use in 43. Also probably only helps with ground fog. Dense thick fog and you're SOL. Probably could have designed a 'bail out system', bomber flies along a beam to a point, where the crew parachutes out, hopefully over smooth terrain. Lose the aircraft, but save to crew for another round.
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Saw Mountbottom yammering about the war. Take away it wasn't the Japanese that were the enemy it was malaria and dysentery. Both would reduce your army to nothing over months. The British won the battle against disease and the Japanese lost.
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I was going to mention, large guns like either ship carried were nearly obsolete in an age of carriers. In particular their original missions, ship to ship slugfests weren't going to happen if the US Navy had anything to say about the matter. Both were probably a bit of a white elephant, but the Hotel Yamoto more so due it's larger size, higher fuel consumption, scarcity of resources, and lack of alternative missions like ship to shore bombardment or as decoys to distract Japanese aircraft from the carriers.
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I'll make a further point, I've long suspected what's happened in my lifetime is growth shifts around unevenly. Both in time and geographically. After 1980 it was far an away easier to achieve growth by increasing the productivity of chinese manufacturing workers than American or European ones. And indeed industrial policy was to move all manufacturing to Asia. Part of that due to economic concerns, partly because of the Japanese industrial policy, and union busting by the Reagan and Bush 1.0 administrations. Reagan's 'war economy stimulus' also devoted a lot of industrial investment to crap that has zero ROI, crap like putting WWII era battleships back in service. One of my points is I believe a lot of investment activity is of low quality. Investments to improve productivity is a small fraction of total investment.
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I tend to think the 'trickle down' idea works off a fatal confusion between money and resources. When I spend a dollar on a good or service, someone gets a dollar. But the labor, energy, or resources that were purchased are consumed. Allocation of resources is about how the economic stream gets divied up, thus the marginal value of resource allocation is very very important. That the wealthy expend their share less frivolous ways than the middle class, doesn't pass the smell test for me.
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