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Graham Rice
Pennyslvania USA, and Nothamptonshire, UK
I'm a garden writer, plantsman and photographer.
Interests: Apart from plants and gardens? Wildlife, reading just about anything, music of all kinds from Stravinsky to punk, my music radio show (The BritMix), fishing, movies, ceramics and glass of the 1950s and 1960s, art...
Recent Activity
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The big fat new book, entitled 1001 Plants You Must Grow Before You Die in Britain, and called 1001 Plants To Dream Of Growing in North America, is packed with great plant stories and great pictures. Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at Transatlantic Gardener
Thank you so much, Beth. At present I'm thinking about the new English garden from 3000 miles away here in the Pennsylvania snow.
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Thank you, Luise... Some plant book gift ideas coming up...
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Kniphofia: The Complete Guide by Christopher Whitehouse is an impressive new plant book that is everything a serious monograph should be. Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Transatlantic Gardener
Thanks, Ed, for helping me solve that little mystery. And yes, the rear garden is splendid - especially as like the house it's two properties joined to make one.
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Thanks, Ed, I'm looking into that. And thank you Genny... it's good to be back posting on the blog.
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Thank you, Jean... Lots of good things are lined up to discuss...
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It’s been quiet around here recently, hasn’t it. Sorry about that. But I'm delighted to say that postings from Transatlantic Gardener have now resumed. Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at Transatlantic Gardener
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Glad to hear that The Moths are back in action, John... If you make any new recordings you know where to send them... http://www.transatlanticplantsman.com/wagonload_of_monkeys/record-labels-and-distributors.html
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You're very welcome, Ivor, it's a great album.
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The Diamond Jubilee Award for the best exhibit in the Great Pavilion at the 2016 Chelsea Flower Show was awarded to Ashwood Nurseries. Continue reading
Posted Jun 3, 2016 at Transatlantic Gardener
Well, that's exact;y the point. It's held in a great growing area and so it should host a fine flower show. BTW I've today received a copy of Robin Parer's new book: The Plant Lover's Guide to Hardy Geraniums. Review coming after I've read it and the three other new titles in the series.
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Three interesting roadside plants spotted in Northamptonshire. Continue reading
Posted Apr 28, 2016 at Transatlantic Gardener
That's an interesting question, Simon. I don't think there is. The closest I can think of is that the yellow skunk cabbage (Lysichiton americanus) is colourful native in wet places in our part of Pennsylvania and I've planted it along our little stream. But in Britain it's classed as a dangerous invasive and planting it has now been banned. There are also plants like dandelions which are nasty weeds on both sides. Having been taken across from Europe by settlers dandelions now spread as prolifically in US gardens as they do in the UK.
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No, not throwing out the pressed weeds...
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Of course, everything at Kew is cultivated to the highest possible standard - even the weeds. But, as it happens, thjs specimen of hairy bitter cress was collected, according to the label, from waste land in nearby Richmond.
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Graham Rice's four rules on weeding. Continue reading
Posted Apr 18, 2016 at Transatlantic Gardener
What I thought was interesting about this guest post was that this is the view not of a Brit who's seen hundreds of English flower shows, but of a young American looking for ideas and inspiration - and not finding very much. Are garden railways and aged balsamic vinegar really going to inspire people to make more of their outdoor space?
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Too many sales booths and not enough flowers and gardens at the San Francisco Flower and Garden Show. Continue reading
Posted Apr 5, 2016 at Transatlantic Gardener
I suppose there's no reason why British gardeners shouldn't tap sugar maples, Jean, except that it's a tree seen far less often in Britain than in North America. Any Brits tapping sugar maples? And yes, boiling down birch sap in the kitchen is going to take a while... And make a lot of steam!
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2016 on Sycamore? Or sycamore? at Transatlantic Gardener
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The sycamore in America is a very different tree from the sycamore in Britain. Continue reading
Posted Mar 14, 2016 at Transatlantic Gardener
That's very interesting, Matt, thank you. Good advice about choosing individual specimens carefully. I remember when I visited Bob Brown's nursery in Worcestershire UK a few years ago (http://justmust.co.uk and http://www.cgf.net) when the Echinacea craze was getting started, he had most of his perennials in pots standing out on stock beds in the usual way. But the pots of echinaceas he had standing up off the ground on slats so that excess moisture could drain away easily. It made a huge difference.
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A species of Pelargonium native to New Zealand has been found in Britain for the first time. Continue reading
Posted Mar 4, 2016 at Transatlantic Gardener
They'll be turning up amongst the offerings from more commercial growers this year and in more retail nurseries and garden centres... Enthusiasm is definitely on the up.
Toggle Commented Mar 2, 2016 on The coleus revival at Transatlantic Gardener
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The trouble is, Jacki, that in the sort of season we've had, even if the soil usually drains well if it's frozen a few inches down drainage is blocked.
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