This is Graham Rice's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Graham Rice's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Graham Rice
Pennyslvania USA, and Nothamptonshire, UK
I'm a garden writer, plantsman and photographer.
Interests: Apart from plants and gardens? Wildlife, reading just about anything, music of all kinds from Stravinsky to punk, my music radio show (The BritMix), fishing, movies, ceramics and glass of the 1950s and 1960s, art...
Recent Activity
Image
New research shows that non-native plants are just as valuable to pollinating insects as native species. Continue reading
Posted Aug 17, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
Gram Parsnip... Very drole... Actually, it turns out that the 'Sweetheart Of The Patio' tomato is only known by that name in the US. In Britain it's known by its original name of 'Losetto'. We can guess which sells the best...
Toggle Commented Aug 10, 2015 on Plant names with a groan at Transatlantic Gardener
1 reply
Image
Report on a new heuchera that's not flamboyant but quietly different. Continue reading
Posted Aug 10, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
Well, Linda, can you send me a picture and I'll see if I can identify it... graham[at]grahamrice.com
Toggle Commented Aug 4, 2015 on Slug resistant hostas? at Transatlantic Gardener
1 reply
Yes, 'Grape Expectations' is lovely although when I went out to look at it yesterday and found that it had turned from the grapey color in the picture to silver I was surprised, to say the least. Still, they tell me it goes grapey again in the fall - we shall see...
Toggle Commented Aug 4, 2015 on Plant names with a groan at Transatlantic Gardener
1 reply
Image
Nurseries and plant breeders plunder a huge range of sources when dreaming up names for their new plants. Some come up with terrible puns... Continue reading
Posted Aug 3, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
You're very welcome, Mahée. I have to say that checking the plants at dusk and collecting up any slugs you come across is a big help in reducing the problem.
Toggle Commented Jul 15, 2015 on Slug resistant hostas? at Transatlantic Gardener
1 reply
Image
Are any hostas really slug resistant? Here are some suggestions. Continue reading
Posted Jul 2, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
Image
A leading botanist wants to change the botanical name for the Welsh poppy. Continue reading
Posted Jun 14, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
Thank you, T. And I'm sure visitors to the show appreciate Mrs Hamilton's generosity. But unfortunately the name chosen to mark her donation is extremely unappealing and uninviting.
1 reply
Image
Screenwriter and garden photographer judywhite finds a wonderful Georgia O'Keeffe painting on display in Walmart's Arkansas home town. Continue reading
Posted Jun 7, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
And thank you, Diane, for your thought provoking comments. I'll try to go take a look at the local lettuce operation when it gets going - and report back.
1 reply
Thanks, Diane. Promoting local agriculture is of course ideal and I was interested to see the recent news of a big new glasshouse lettuce operation coming to our county in north east Pennsylvania - it's said it will employ 200 people! But the value of a local operation, using plentiful local water, must surely be set against the need for so much heat in what I think is zone 5. Plentiful water, low transport costs versus the emissions resulting from all that heat use. It's not that simple, is it...
1 reply
Image
A Powerhouse Plant, that fulfils the ideal of multiseason colour promoted in Graham Rice's book Powerhouse Plants, wins the 2015 Plant Of The Year award at the Chelsea Flower Show. Continue reading
Posted May 31, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
Image
A look back at plants recently discussed on Graham Rice's RHS New Plants blog. Continue reading
Posted May 10, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
Wow! That's good to know... These Kew books are certainly very impressive - and have been since (dare I say it) I was involved in their publication decades ago!
1 reply
Image
In the garden, a European Corydalis species is slow to spread. In New York and elsewhere, an Asian Corydalis species is worrying invasive plant experts. Continue reading
Posted May 3, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
Image
Review, by Graham Rice, of the book The Genus Meconopsis by Christopher Grey-Wilson. "The triumphant culmination of a lifetime of study." Continue reading
Posted Apr 12, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
I think the point was to tax industrial and agricultural water use, not domestic water supplies. Interestingly, we pay about $800 a year for home water (and sewage) for our two bedroom cottage in England...
1 reply
Interesting solution, Beth, except that a free market in water might well result in the agricultural corporations with all the clout manipulating the system to their own advantage - same as in other markets. Here's another option I've heard: tax the use of the water, which will reduce consumption, and use the revenue to make grants to the water utilities to mend the leaks in their pipes. Interesting...
1 reply
Image
Watering lettuce uses the same amount of water as watering golf courses and why we should all give up using spinklers. Continue reading
Posted Apr 5, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
Yes, I thought the de-salination was an especially good part. Have to say, I was fooled at first. It wasn't till I was exchanging emails with T&M about the variety of viola in the baskets that I cottoned on. But whoever had the idea deserves a bonus! And yes, Dermot, they really should actually do it!
1 reply
Image
To celebrate their 160th anniversary, British seed and plant company have hung 160 baskets of their new pansy 'Waterfall' on either side of a bridge near their Suffolk headquarters. Continue reading
Posted Apr 1, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
Image
The five volume classic Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles by W. J. Bean is now available free online. Continue reading
Posted Mar 16, 2015 at Transatlantic Gardener
Yes, theatrics... Everything seemed connected to Disney. OK, I'm sure they paid well for the privilege - but still. Whatever happened to the idea that the point of a flower show is - well, flowers! But, if you hold a flower show in winter, flowers are going to be in short supply in spite of the skills of local growers forcing plants in their greenhouses. At least the plant competition - The Hamilton Horticourt I 'm sorry to say it was called - continued the tradition of showing good specimens of interesting plants.
1 reply