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Gye Greene
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"After dinner, I read it until I had to learn lines for Star Trek" Yeah, that happens to a lot of us. ;) (I hope you're fully aware of what a wonderful -- but peculiarly a-typical -- life you've had.) --GG
Toggle Commented Mar 25, 2009 on Books I Love: Open Net at WWdN: In Exile
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"Watching animae since you were a kid." Hm! Does "Speed Racer" or "Star Blazers" count? :) --GG
Toggle Commented Oct 1, 2008 on i worked on naruto today at WWdN: In Exile
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"Watching animae since you were a kid." Hm! Does "Speed Racer" or "Star Blazers" count? :) --GG
Toggle Commented Oct 1, 2008 on i worked on naruto today at WWdN: In Exile
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I'm from Seattle. You **must** visit Archie McPhee's! It's ''weird stuff'' shop in the Ballard neighborhood (a quick taxi ride from both downtown and the Seattle Center). Some good geek stuff, plus glow-in-the-dark cockroaches and other stuff, including unusual "surplus" things. They have a web presence, so you can Google 'em if you like. --GG
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I'm from Seattle. You **must** visit Archie McPhee's! It's ''weird stuff'' shop in the Ballard neighborhood (a quick taxi ride from both downtown and the Seattle Center). Some good geek stuff, plus glow-in-the-dark cockroaches and other stuff, including unusual "surplus" things. They have a web presence, so you can Google 'em if you like. --GG
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My first thought, when I read "There was a time when I called myself an actor/writer" was, "Cool! A multi-classed character!" Then, when you specified "actor, slash writer": "Hm. He must be **really** getting in to Guitar Hero. Personally, I'm more of a professor-Hendrix-Woodworker. --GG
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My first thought, when I read "There was a time when I called myself an actor/writer" was, "Cool! A multi-classed character!" Then, when you specified "actor, slash writer": "Hm. He must be **really** getting in to Guitar Hero. Personally, I'm more of a professor-Hendrix-Woodworker. --GG
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Seems like women at a gamers convention -- or at a Trek convention -- would have their pick of the lot. BTW - saw this and thought of you (Wil): ''Mr. Spock for President'' t-shirt. http://someofnothing.blogspot.com/2007/09/mr-spock-for-president.html Classic Trek meets politics. :) --GG
Toggle Commented Sep 19, 2007 on it's so fun to relate at WWdN: In Exile
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Seems like women at a gamers convention -- or at a Trek convention -- would have their pick of the lot. BTW - saw this and thought of you (Wil): ''Mr. Spock for President'' t-shirt. http://someofnothing.blogspot.com/2007/09/mr-spock-for-president.html Classic Trek meets politics. :) --GG
Toggle Commented Sep 19, 2007 on it's so fun to relate at WWdN: In Exile
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O.k., so I'm 38 (hardly young!) -- but abbrvs TOTALLy make sense! And it's not new. In any medium where it's cumbersome to send one character -- whether it's because you're using your thumb, or because it's a series of dots and dashes -- regular users abbrv. And don't tell me that when you're leaving a note for your partner on the kitchen table, you don't abbreviate **just** a little? ("To store, back @3. XXX OOO!") From Wikipedia: The relatively limited speed at which Morse code can be sent led to the development of an extensive number of abbreviations to speed communication. These include prosigns and Q codes, plus a restricted standardized format for typical messages. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morse_code) Example of Q-codes: QRA = What ship or coast station is that? QRB = What is your distance? QRC = What is your true bearing? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_code) Likewise, Braille has standard codes for "wh-", "-ing", "-ed", etc. So, nothing new. :) And if "full text/proper English" is such an issue, then we should all speak like Data (ST:NG): No contractions! (Is that not indeed correct?) Ayep. --GG (P.S. Love the post; this is more in response to the other comments.) ;)
Toggle Commented Sep 13, 2007 on ill communication at WWdN: In Exile
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O.k., so I'm 38 (hardly young!) -- but abbrvs TOTALLy make sense! And it's not new. In any medium where it's cumbersome to send one character -- whether it's because you're using your thumb, or because it's a series of dots and dashes -- regular users abbrv. And don't tell me that when you're leaving a note for your partner on the kitchen table, you don't abbreviate **just** a little? ("To store, back @3. XXX OOO!") From Wikipedia: The relatively limited speed at which Morse code can be sent led to the development of an extensive number of abbreviations to speed communication. These include prosigns and Q codes, plus a restricted standardized format for typical messages. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morse_code) Example of Q-codes: QRA = What ship or coast station is that? QRB = What is your distance? QRC = What is your true bearing? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_code) Likewise, Braille has standard codes for "wh-", "-ing", "-ed", etc. So, nothing new. :) And if "full text/proper English" is such an issue, then we should all speak like Data (ST:NG): No contractions! (Is that not indeed correct?) Ayep. --GG (P.S. Love the post; this is more in response to the other comments.) ;)
Toggle Commented Sep 13, 2007 on ill communication at WWdN: In Exile
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One of my Aunt Joan's exclamations is ''Holey Socks!!!'' --GG
Toggle Commented May 26, 2007 on comedy from our resident genius at WWdN: In Exile
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One of my Aunt Joan's exclamations is ''Holey Socks!!!'' --GG
Toggle Commented May 26, 2007 on comedy from our resident genius at WWdN: In Exile
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Ah! When in Seattle, ya **gotta** hit Archie McPhee's -- a wacky store in Ballard (a few neighborhoods north of downtown). Sells glow-in-the-dark cockroaches, punching nun and punching Amish puppets, and various geeky things (e.g. briefcases w/ binary on them). No affiliation, etc... They have a website, worth (Googling.) --GG
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Ah! When in Seattle, ya **gotta** hit Archie McPhee's -- a wacky store in Ballard (a few neighborhoods north of downtown). Sells glow-in-the-dark cockroaches, punching nun and punching Amish puppets, and various geeky things (e.g. briefcases w/ binary on them). No affiliation, etc... They have a website, worth (Googling.) --GG
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Hmmm... an actor, who's also a writer... who's getting in to writing comics... which are essentially storyboards... So: how long before you start writing and directing your own film shorts (or feature-lengths)? You certainly have the pedigree. ;) --GG
Toggle Commented May 2, 2007 on warp factor awesome at WWdN: In Exile
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Hmmm... an actor, who's also a writer... who's getting in to writing comics... which are essentially storyboards... So: how long before you start writing and directing your own film shorts (or feature-lengths)? You certainly have the pedigree. ;) --GG
Toggle Commented May 2, 2007 on warp factor awesome at WWdN: In Exile
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Just reading thru the posts after mine, and saw this from Justin Hall: ''the folks who have been through intense injustice seem to react one of two ways... either they try to take a stand for people who are themselves victims of injustice; or they become bitter and angry, lashing out in hostility towards everything positive in their lives (and the lives of the people around them)'' Sounds like the makings of a super-hero/super-villain ''origins'' story... --GG
Toggle Commented May 2, 2007 on the butterfly tree at WWdN: In Exile
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Just reading thru the posts after mine, and saw this from Justin Hall: ''the folks who have been through intense injustice seem to react one of two ways... either they try to take a stand for people who are themselves victims of injustice; or they become bitter and angry, lashing out in hostility towards everything positive in their lives (and the lives of the people around them)'' Sounds like the makings of a super-hero/super-villain ''origins'' story... --GG
Toggle Commented May 2, 2007 on the butterfly tree at WWdN: In Exile
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Effective, evocative (sp?) writing -- reminded me of myself in gradeschool (sensitive kid; cried a lot). Re. your parents not confronting the teacher: In addition to it being a generational thing, there's a relationship between level of education and willingness to confront educational figures on their kids' behalf. I forget what your folks did for a living: If they were working-class and/or didn't have a college degree, that might explain it. BTW: Australia must be **way** behind the ''Heroes'' curve: Last week they **finally** showed Mr. Sulu -- and that was just the cameo at the end of the episode. I'm very glad you didn't ''spoiler'' it for we folks in the Down Undies. --GG
Toggle Commented May 1, 2007 on the butterfly tree at WWdN: In Exile
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Effective, evocative (sp?) writing -- reminded me of myself in gradeschool (sensitive kid; cried a lot). Re. your parents not confronting the teacher: In addition to it being a generational thing, there's a relationship between level of education and willingness to confront educational figures on their kids' behalf. I forget what your folks did for a living: If they were working-class and/or didn't have a college degree, that might explain it. BTW: Australia must be **way** behind the ''Heroes'' curve: Last week they **finally** showed Mr. Sulu -- and that was just the cameo at the end of the episode. I'm very glad you didn't ''spoiler'' it for we folks in the Down Undies. --GG
Toggle Commented May 1, 2007 on the butterfly tree at WWdN: In Exile
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Me again. Did a quick search for relevant research, but since Soc. of Ed. (and Stratification) isn't my area, I'm probably not entering in the right search terms. However, I did find one piece of research (Trusheim & Crouse, 1981) that found that the selectivity in admissions, **not** the university prestige per se, was what predicted men's future income (measured as middle-aged men). (source: Trusheim, Dale and James Crouse. 1981. ''Effects of College Prestige on Men's Occupational Status and Income.'' Research in Higher Education, 14, 4, June, 283-304. If you're truly curious, contact your local Sociology dept. and ask to speak to someone who does Stratification or Sociology of Education work. :) --GG
Toggle Commented Dec 1, 2006 on regarding advertising at WWdN: In Exile
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Me again. Did a quick search for relevant research, but since Soc. of Ed. (and Stratification) isn't my area, I'm probably not entering in the right search terms. However, I did find one piece of research (Trusheim & Crouse, 1981) that found that the selectivity in admissions, **not** the university prestige per se, was what predicted men's future income (measured as middle-aged men). (source: Trusheim, Dale and James Crouse. 1981. ''Effects of College Prestige on Men's Occupational Status and Income.'' Research in Higher Education, 14, 4, June, 283-304. If you're truly curious, contact your local Sociology dept. and ask to speak to someone who does Stratification or Sociology of Education work. :) --GG
Toggle Commented Dec 1, 2006 on regarding advertising at WWdN: In Exile
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College costs: Personally, I wouldn't buy in to the ''expensive college = better college hype.'' I've attended three universities (large state school; small state school; small private school) -- and although the small private school was nice and all that, the ''dollars to quality'' ratio (in hindsight) wasn't enough to justify it. College education is what you put in to it: if you study your butt off, you'll do fine; if you slack, you'll bomb (or, barely scrape by). And the cost of tuition (or the school's prestige) won't make that much difference. Any relationships could likely be from self-selection: upper-class parents tend to value education, and instill these values in their kids; upper-class parents can afford pricier schools; thus, the fancier schools are populated with better **students** -- and thus, do better. Plus: You live in CA; don't they have a most excellent state school system? FWIW: I'm about two months away from finishing my Ph.D. in Sociology. I've been both a student, and a college instructor (at two universities). Don't believe the hype. ;) -Gye Greene
Toggle Commented Dec 1, 2006 on regarding advertising at WWdN: In Exile
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College costs: Personally, I wouldn't buy in to the ''expensive college = better college hype.'' I've attended three universities (large state school; small state school; small private school) -- and although the small private school was nice and all that, the ''dollars to quality'' ratio (in hindsight) wasn't enough to justify it. College education is what you put in to it: if you study your butt off, you'll do fine; if you slack, you'll bomb (or, barely scrape by). And the cost of tuition (or the school's prestige) won't make that much difference. Any relationships could likely be from self-selection: upper-class parents tend to value education, and instill these values in their kids; upper-class parents can afford pricier schools; thus, the fancier schools are populated with better **students** -- and thus, do better. Plus: You live in CA; don't they have a most excellent state school system? FWIW: I'm about two months away from finishing my Ph.D. in Sociology. I've been both a student, and a college instructor (at two universities). Don't believe the hype. ;) -Gye Greene
Toggle Commented Dec 1, 2006 on regarding advertising at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply