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Marianna Scheffer
Hilo, Hawaii
Happily retired in Paradise
Recent Activity
That is so positive,Naomi.
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I had a spray bottle of Green Works, but after I finished using it I put some dishwashing liquid and water in the bottle and now use that for cleaning my bathroom instead. I don't like the faux cleaning agent smell, although it is not quite as gag-inducing as enzyme cleaners, which really make me want to throw up.
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Marianna Scheffer is now following Mary Ellen Kirkendall
Apr 4, 2014
Guns won't protect a person when a whole hillside collapses on him.
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That saying about fish without a bicycle has to come from the German, where it is a women without a man is like a "Fisch ohne Fahrad." This could be from an older German saying that a man without a woman is like a fish without a bicycle. It is a very odd saying, in any case, sounds funny and can be interpreted in odd ways.
Toggle Commented Mar 24, 2014 on Gloria S. joins my decade... at a little red hen
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I heard her speak years ago at Powell's. I thought at the time that she was glossing over many pressing women's issues. Maybe that is a good thing, because we certainly can use an optimistic point of view, but I always wondered if she didn't downplay the difficulties of existence for us women, who after all mostly lead rather restricted lives contingent on the needs and desires of others. But it appears that she kept a lot of her own troubles to herself.
Toggle Commented Mar 24, 2014 on Gloria S. joins my decade... at a little red hen
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I was a big coffee drinker but now have only one fully-leaded cup a day and the rest decaf.
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2014 on Deep Thinking about coffee at a little red hen
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Oh, what I would really like to see would be a 1% national sales tax on online purchases. This would not be so regressive as a regular sales tax, because people who buy things online are mostly affluent.
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The thing about our market is that the produce is cheap, much cheaper and fresher than in the supermarkets.
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Fear not. We pay about 50% of our income out in taxes. Unlike Oregon, which has no sales tax, Hawaii has a value added tax of 4.166%, according to Terry, which is not just on the usual consumer items that are taxed but also on food, clothing and medicine. Which means, of course, that every time an item changes hands, the tax is 4.166%, and the end tax can be multiples of that. This is very regressive. Our property tax on our primary residence is ridiculously low, although we pay a fair amount of tax on the rental and on our other properties. So we may be affluent, but we certainly pay our share of taxes! I would prefer a less regressive tax structure, however: less for consumer goods and more for property.
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Some people here have made a small business for themselves: They pool their food stamps, buy pounds of pork butt and pork belly, and make lau lau, a traditional Hawaiian meal. Lau lau is wrapped in taro leaves and ti leaves, which they grow themselves, and they put a little fish in it, too. They sell the value added product to a local grocery store. I have two lau lau which I'm going to eat this weekend. You could call this a public-private initiative!
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There were hungry kids living next door to us in a coastside community I lived in in California. My mother literally almost died of hunger during the Depression. So yes, hunger existed and exists. Food stamps have helped greatly! This reminds me of what I think about charity in general. Sure, it's nice to feed people out of the goodness of your heart, etc. but a food stamp program is much better at eliminating hunger.
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This sounds like a model of how businesses like this should be run. Provides a service, jobs, etc. Does what it says it does and is high morale. Kudos!
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I certainly enjoy reading this in these disheartening gluten-free times.
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No. I am not a subtle person, except by accident. Happy Valentine's Day!
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I lived through five brutal winters in Madison. Once it got to -29. Ugh.
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I read the Sunday Times too. I download it on Wednesdays and Sundays. That is enough NYT for me.
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I love L.A. There is a kind of freedom there I have never experienced elsewhere. It's nothing one can describe or explain. It's in the air, which, by the way, is cleaner than it used to be! And how wonderful of you to share this family occasion and pix with your followers. Thank you! --Marianna
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I downloaded the NY Times ($.99 on my Kindle) and found it had nothing I felt like reading except for one article (about an Israeli who moved to Berlin). Truly the worst NYT I have ever read. Between boring and trivial there was nothing. We subscribe now to the Guardian Weekly, which is a wonderful news source. It gets delivered to us in a timely manner by the U.S. P.O, unlike most periodicals that arrive here 2-3 weeks late.
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Looks as if Type Pad swallowed my last comment!
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It amazes me how creativity thrives in us elders. How original we get when we no longer do things for extrinsic purposes but just for the sheer joy of doing and producing. It's as if we reconnect with our childhood. That work of Ron's is so colorful and original!
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You are funny!
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Almost makes me wish I could knit.
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Kind of feeling optimistic as the darkness of the Bush years recedes. This does not mean there aren't a lot of troubles ahead, but most of them are the result of bad past policies. So we can hope for remedies and improvements.
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I confess a certain affection for Martha Stewart. Her simple ideas for improving day to day household routines and her little food tricks are quite good.
Toggle Commented Nov 22, 2013 on Goddess Worship: why not now? at a little red hen
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