This is Dr. Ayala's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Dr. Ayala's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Dr. Ayala
Pediatrician, artist, mom and serious home cook, blogs about nutrition and health
Recent Activity
Image
In a pilot study, people who changed their mealtimes lost on average twice the amount of body fat compared to the control group, despite not consciously restricting their caloric intake. Continue reading
Image
It’s back to school time, and to get the school year off to a good start kids need not only school supplies and enough sleep – they need the right foods to fuel their studies. Continue reading
Thanks, Anna!
1 reply
Image
A group of heart experts studied the evidence, and debated trending nutrition controversies. Here's the latest on dairy, sugar, coffee, alcohol, mushrooms and hummus. Continue reading
Image
Are gene-based diet recommendations ready for prime time? Researchers set out to analyze all the relevant scientific studies and find the answer. Continue reading
Image
New studies provide further evidence that if you enjoy your coffee you can do so free of guilt – coffee is probably good for you, as long as you remember that coffee, at its essence, is a calorie free, unsweetened drink. Continue reading
Image
“You’re eating for two” is often interpreted as “eat twice as much” which is, admittedly, more catchy and convenient than “you should eat healthy, gain some weight but not too much (and not too little)”. Unfortunately, excessive weight gain in pregnancy isn't just hard to lose, it may have a lasting effect on the child’s weight and health. Continue reading
Image
The average individual greenhouse gases generated weekly from food spending in the US are similar to driving from New York City to Baltimore. Greenhouse gas emissions related to food production account for a fifth of all emissions in the US – as much as those produced by the entire US industrial activity. But the greenhouse gases generated by households vary enormously depending on food choices. Continue reading
Susan, thanks! You can subscribe (it's in the left column of the blog) sign up for my newsletter or my Twitter feed (@DrAyala)
1 reply
Image
A review of the scientific literature concludes that even if you don’t consume extra calories, and don’t gain weight, there are metabolic downsides to consuming soda and sugary drinks. Continue reading
Image
The college year is coming to an end and many first-year students will be dismayed to find that their clothes have gotten a bit tight. A new study tests how strategies from behavioral economics could help students make better food choices – without even trying. Continue reading
Image
A new study shows why you should think again about alcohol in moderation for heart health. It looked at alcohol consumption and the risk of cardiovascular disease and found that alcohol was associated higher risk of stroke, heart failure, aortic aneurism and hypertensive disease, the greater the drinking the higher the risk, and there was no threshold at which drinking was safe, or seemed beneficial. Continue reading
Image
A new study joins others in showing that over time, well-meaning parents’ attempt to curb unhealthy snacking by restricting them backfires and achieves the opposite results. On the other hand, if parents remove unhealthy foods and replace them with healthy foods, without comment of fuss, kids eat better after a while. Continue reading
Image
New studies show that kids prefer vegetables when they're seasoned with herbs and spices. Serving veggies raw and plain can work if they’re at the height of ripeness, freshness and flavor, and if people already love that particular veggie.For other vegetables, especially those with a bit of bitterness, seasoning could make a huge difference, and a little effort and attention could elevate their desirability and consumption. Continue reading
Image
Recent studies find that the state of the inhabitants of our gut may affect our immune system, our weight status, our susceptibility to disease, our energy levels, our mental state and our mood. But how does one get the kind of microbial society that’s most conducive to wellness? Continue reading
Image
A new study evaluates the Mediterranean diet’s environmental impact. The better the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, the lower the environmental cost – natural resources use and emissions go down with Mediterranean adherence. Meat – especially beef meat – eggs and dairy consumption have the highest detrimental impact on the environment. Continue reading
Image
When it comes to weight, couples are symbiotic. Couples’ trajectory of weight gain often match, and a study in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that when one spouse becomes obese, the likelihood of the other spouse becoming obese is 37 percent! Could weight loss spread in such a way? Continue reading
Image
A new meta-analysis found that family meals are associated with lower risk of being overweight, with a healthier diet, and fewer unhealthy diet habits. The dinner table is our opportunity for nourishing, minimally processed, fruit and veggie rich, free of sugary drinks, conversation-infused, digitally distraction-less, unrushed oasis. Continue reading
Image
If there were a drug that could lower your cancer risk by 25 or 33 percent, wouldn’t you be urging your doctor to prescribe it for you? I bet you would, especially if there were no nasty side effects to warn about, since the treatment is absolutely 100 percent safe. Continue reading
Image
It’s the season to celebrate – December festivities bring a little too much to eat – but come January, it’ll be time to get back on track for a healthy 2018. And there must be a better way than counting carbs, fats, calories and sodium. If you’re looking for an easy to follow, realistic, positive, healthy living goal for 2018, try eating real. Continue reading
Image
When it comes to storing fat it isn’t just how much we eat, but also what we eat. Some foods – and no, it isn’t just beer that causes a big belly – lead to fat storage in the worst-for-health places – in the liver and around internal organs. A new study shows you can preferentially target belly fat by a weight-loss diet a Mediterranean diet. Continue reading
Image
A state of gratitude improves our own health in clear and measurable ways. Despite gratitude's proven benefits, noticing our blessings isn’t easy. Loss and bad luck are much more obvious. Food can be an excellent cue to remind us to appreciate what we have and to give some thought to the wonder of what made our meal possible. Continue reading
Image
Whole grains – unlike refined grains, which have been stripped off their bran and germ and rendered into pretty much pure carbs – retain many essential nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, fiber, polyphenols and ‘good’ fats. They’re the type of foods that healthy diets are made of. Continue reading
Image
Chocolate research centers on cocoa flavonols. Flavonols are plant molecules, abundant in many foods. Cocoa beans are seeds, and seeds are generally packed with important phytochemicals to protect the seed and enable its development into a full-grown plant. Tea, onions, kale, grapes and apples also contain similar flavonols. That's why we should eat lots of and mostly plants. Continue reading
Image
Fall is here, the time to celebrate the harvest. And a good occasion to look at what’s new in organic food. Here are a few fresh reasons to be optimistic. Continue reading