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Chuck Hollis
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I was born in 1959. I guess I have the dubious honor of watching the world change for over half a century. Yes, I could fill several uninteresting pages with the rapid pace of innovation in technology, human health, physics, economics, chemistry, etc. It seems the boundaries of human knowledge continue to expand like a supernova. More interesting to me is how this new world is changing us — as individuals, and as members of society. It’s easy to get caught up in the wave of “now”, and lose sight of how we used to think about the world. But, make no mistake, as we change the world, the world changes us. A Starting Point If I could point to one world-morphing change above all else, it would be the internet — and everything that goes with it: the web, mobile devices, search engines, big data, the proverbial IoT, social media, constant connectivity — the whole online world We all realize the internet is a big deal, but just what is it doing to us personally? Staying Constantly Connected Is A Given I do love staying constantly connected to my family and friends. Huge win. But not all is rosy.... Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at Chuck's Blog
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Like so many people in this industry, I can get easily enamored by Big Ideas. Powerfully intoxicating, they take your mind off the day-to-day, and transport you to a different place that might exist in the future. Like a moth to a flame, I’m drawn in — and it takes major willpower to put them down, and move on to something else. Fortunately, I don’t appear to be alone in this regard. Over the course of eight years of blogging and 1200+ blog posts, there are clearly times when I have fallen prey to the seductive power of Big Ideas. I thought it might be fun to go back and ask the question — where are they now? Private Clouds This one goes way back to 2009. It was an interesting time. Virtualization (primary VMware) was clearly on its journey of encapsulating the majority of enterprise workloads. Nick Carr had written “The Big Switch”, which foretold that a world of cheap, limitless computing from public clouds would consume all forms of enterprise computing — a premise I didn’t entirely agree with at the time, and still don’t to this day. Amazon and Microsoft were trying to convince the world that... Continue reading
Posted Nov 13, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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After finishing university work, I assiduously kept many of my textbooks, thinking they would be incredibly useful at some point in the future. After all, they were so expensive! I was a fool. After the second house move, I tossed them. They were interesting, but certainly not worth lugging around. And nobody wanted them, either. As I reflect back on various chapters in my personal Storage Encyclopedia, I’m realizing that there are vast tranches that are candidates for leaving behind. Yes, many topics were once interesting, but not exactly useful going forward. I suppose that’s progress? On Knowing A Lot About A Topic Most People Find Incredibly Boring When working with colleagues or customers, I’ll often get the comment “gee, you know a lot about this stuff”. I guess I should by now. I’ve spent over twenty years working with just about every aspect of storage — from the underlying technologies and their supply chains, to macroeconomic consumption patterns and operational models and the structure of the overall storage industry. With a whole lot in-between. I never set out to be an expert in anything, but I guess that sort of happened along the way. It's not very useful at... Continue reading
Posted Nov 7, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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I had a bit of fun last week, commenting on Nigel Poulton’s blog post discussing this topic, among others. What I really enjoyed was the polite but vivacious discussion that emerged in the comments. For the most part, people were disagreeing without being disagreeable. How civil. That being said, I tend to reflect on things after the fact. I came to the conclusion that it was an incomplete discussion on several levels. If you’re not into storage stuff, perhaps this would be a good post to skip. A friendly reminder: everything in this blog represents my personal opinion, and is not reviewed nor approved by employer. Or anyone else for that matter. Why Are We Talking About This? If you’re in the world of enterprise IT, storage is a big deal — it’s where all the information lives. Storage in an enterprise IT setting can be costly and difficult to manage. Storage professionals can make a good living by helping IT teams to tame the storage beast so that’s it a bit less unruly. The winds of change are upon us, though. Server designs (and storage software) has matured to the point where it can be seriously considered as an... Continue reading
Posted Oct 30, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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OK, I’m a sucker for cool words. Especially when they neatly summarize a very complex and nuanced discussion. I heard this one being used at one of our internal VMware meetings, and it rang like a bell in my brain. I’ll reserve the right to give credit where credit is due when I track down the original source. Hybrid — as in hybrid clouds. “-icity” — a measure of degree, as in “elasticity”. Hybridicity: a measure of just how hybrid is a particular cloud computing environment. In this context, more hybridicity is better than less hybridicity. If we’re going to see more mainstream adoption of public cloud services by enterprise IT groups, I believe the core argument is going to be around hybridicity — how much, what kind, how good? Standard Experiences Matter I travel a lot, and I frequently rent a car. Fortunately for me, driving a car rented from vendor A is remarkably similar to driving a car rented from vendor B. The control surfaces are the same. The behaviors are the same. And, if something should go wrong, my problem resolution process is the same. Not to belabor the point, but imagine if every car rental agency... Continue reading
Posted Oct 29, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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As keyboard players, we spend endless time obsessing over our choice of instrument: sounds, keybed feel, upgradeability, weight, etc. Many of us also spend a great deal of time obsessing over our amplifcation -- and for good reason: that's the link between our instrument and the audience. In the world... Continue reading
Posted Oct 28, 2014 at Late Bloomer
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The enterprise IT model is changing fast: IT now strives to become the internal service provider of choice, offering an attractive portfolio of services that are convenient for the business to consume. This transformation should not be a revelation to anyone. All of the sudden, IT starts to look more like modern manufacturing, and less of a project-oriented crafts guild. As anyone who has run a good-sized business will know, it’s all about “the numbers”: how much, how good, how fast, etc. You wouldn’t try to run a business without good financial instrumentation — and the same is quickly becoming true for many progressive IT shops. But the question comes up — what tools exist that do all of this? I’d like take you on a quick tour through VMware’s vRealize Business offering. I think is one of the many “hidden gems” in the VMware portfolio. It offers a surprisingly rich suite of ITBM (IT Business Management) functionality that’s becoming essential in modern IT environments — and stands head-and-shoulders above many alternatives. Say what you want about bean-counters: money matters. Why This Is Becoming More Important When IT didn’t have to move fast, its business management tools didn’t have to... Continue reading
Posted Oct 15, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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In our increasingly digital world, sometimes there is no substitute for the Real Thing. As a keyboard player, there are all sorts of great digital analogs of real pianos: stage pianos, software pianos that run on your laptop, etc. Amazing technology -- good sounding, infinitely adjustable, etc. If someone was... Continue reading
Posted Oct 12, 2014 at Late Bloomer
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One of the more fascinating efforts across the EMC Federation (EMC II, VMware and Pivotal) is the substantial investment behind what is now known as Federation Solutions Like many of you, I have developed a natural skepticism of just about anything branded a “solution”, as so many are just marketing wrappers for familiar technologies. This time, though, it appears to be quite different — there’s real engineering at work here, pointed at real heavy-duty challenges. Once you wade into the gory details, there’s a lot to like. The New IT Agenda The rationale for Federation Solutions is based on the presumption that most enterprise IT organizations will have to field 5 new capabilities in the near future. None of these should be a surprise to anyone. 1) Mobility — provide access to all applications and data through mobile devices 2) Apps — use agile development to build new customer-centric applications 3) Big data — build a business data lake to deliver insights using all available data 4) Infrastructure — move to a software-defined data center (SDDC) infrastructure, expand to hybrid cloud 5) Security — use adaptive, data-driven security to rapidly respond to emerging threats Any one of these is a... Continue reading
Posted Oct 9, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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The news over the weekend that HP was splitting into two separate businesses made me deeply ruminate over the future of the IT industry — helped along by a few adult beverages. At one level, one could simply say that this is the familiar changing-of-the-guard in the IT business: larger companies with familiar business models being overtaken by smaller and more nimble upstarts. But I think there’s more going on here that meets the eye. When I talk about the future of the IT industry with my colleagues and customers, there's all sorts of theories about what's happening, and why. And, yes, I do have my opinions. Theory #1 — Startups Are Eating The Established Player’s Lunches There’s something many people find exciting about following the startup scene. Me, not so much. It’s like the lottery: many play, few win. In my little corner of the IT world (e.g. storage), we’ve seen all manner of new startups in the last few years. The insider consensus is that supply exceeds demand: the market doesn’t need that many new storage players, so there will be winners and losers. Some seem to be competing on how fast they can burn cash. Too much... Continue reading
Posted Oct 6, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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Navigating a typical career isn’t easy. Your interests aren’t always aligned with everyone else’s: your employer, your manager, your co-workers, etc. Give in to external pressure, and you can end up miserable before long. Take a strong, independent stand, and everyone will likely be unhappy with you before long. So how do you navigate that quintessential win-win? That’s how I see mentoring: helping good people craft their approach to getting what they want out of their career. The advantages for those being mentored are substantial: an impartial perspective, good advice, new connections, and honest feedback. But being a mentor for others also has its rewards, often unappreciated by many. I’ve had the good fortune of being mentored, and being a mentor. I’d recommend both for just about anyone so inclined. On Being Mentored Much has been written on this topic. Some of it is good advice, and some of it is completely unrealistic based on my experience. Not every senior person can be a decent mentor, it demands a specific profile which isn’t exactly common. And not every person who fits the profile has the time or interest in being a mentor. One frequent error I see is people aiming... Continue reading
Posted Sep 25, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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A memo from Captain Obvious: flash continues to change how we think about storage. For me, the party started way back in 2008 when EMC introduced an enterprise-grade flash drive for Symmetrix. Fast forward to 2014, and the party is still rocking strong … Up to now, most of my customer discussions have been how to best use flash with precision: surgical strikes on key areas where IO response times are a problem. The approach makes a certain sense: flash drives are more expensive than the magnetic spinning variety. But in the last six months, it’s not unusual to meet a customer that sees themselves going “all flash” either now, or before too long. The mindset has clearly begun to shift from "use flash to manage performance problems" to "use flash as the default". We're not talking exotic use cases, it's showing up in bread-and-butter enterprise IT settings. And the motivations are quite interesting. The Basics Of Flash If we’re going to over-simplify, it’s all about the need for speed. Yes, flash capacity is more expensive than disk capacity. But when it comes to performance, it’s an outright bargain. For most IO profiles, flash drives clearly offer more performance bang-for-buck... Continue reading
Posted Sep 16, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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If you’re a server manufacturer, you’re playing a very demanding game. There’s a never-ending parade of new technologies you’ve got to rapidly adopt. Customers expect both flawless execution as well as steadily declining prices. And you’ve got some pretty aggressive competitors as well :) You’re also paying attention to shifting workload demands from your customers. As I track the various server vendor announcements, I couldn’t help but notice a pronounced shift towards designs that are obviously intended to be used as part of a storage or database farm. Looks like the pendulum is swinging — again. Differentiating Terms Here, we’re discussing software-based storage (vs. software-defined storage). The distinction is important: software-based storage is anything that doesn’t prefer specialized external storage hardware, e.g. designed to run on industry-standard servers. In this category should be software-based storage products (VSAN, Nexenta, ScaleIO, Scality, Maxta, etc.) as well as HDFS (basically a storage system for big data) as well as the newer databases, etc. Any software that stores and retrieves data, provides persistence and protection, etc. would be part of this discussion. Indeed, even IDC -- the scorekeeper of the storage biz -- has introduced a new tracking category: software-defined storage platform, or SDS-P.... Continue reading
Posted Sep 9, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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For those of you interested in software-defined storage, I wanted to point you to two pieces (written by me) that you might find useful. The first is more of a conversational treatment: if you're interested in SDS, what should you be looking for? It's a quick read, and doesn't require that you be an enterprise architect to follow along. The second is a more exhaustive treatise on SDS from a VMware perspective. It is lengthy, detailed and is aimed at enterprise architects who need to take a multi-year view. It will also give you a sense of some of the areas VMware will be focusing on (both alone and with partners) without getting into roadmap details. At some point, these will be posted on the VMware website -- just wanted to give you all a preview! "Understanding The DNA Of Software-Defined Storage" "The VMware Perspective On Software-Defined Storage" As always: feedback, commentary, criticisms, complaints, etc. -- all welcome! -------------------------------- Like this post? Why not subscribe via email? Continue reading
Posted Sep 4, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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Browse the various online forums, and you’ll see that a good portion of the discussion is around the merits (or lack thereof) of one keyboard vs. another. Hey, we’re keyboard players — no surprise that we pay a lot of attention to the instruments we play! I could make this... Continue reading
Posted Sep 1, 2014 at Late Bloomer
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So many keyboard players obsess on getting the right keyboard (or perhaps several keyboards!). They spend many thousands of dollars — over and over again — looking for that better sound. These same people then often don’t give all that much thought to their amplification. Maybe they think the sound... Continue reading
Posted Sep 1, 2014 at Late Bloomer
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If you’re going to be part of a band, that means learning new music. If you’re going to be moving between bands on a semi-regular basis, that can mean learning a lot of new music quickly. While it would be nice to leisurely learn a new song every few weeks,... Continue reading
Posted Aug 30, 2014 at Late Bloomer
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Maybe they see me playing in one of my bands. Maybe I’m at a party, there’s alcohol involved, and there’s a piano nearby. Regardless, I frequently get approached by later-in-life people with that burning question: how do I learn to do what you’re doing? It looks like so much fun... Continue reading
Posted Aug 29, 2014 at Late Bloomer
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If you look how an orchestra is organized, you’ll find the piano next to the other percussion instruments: tympani drums, etc. As pianos produce their sound by hammers hitting strings, it makes a certain sense. While I’m always impressed by a piano player whose technique can produce sensuous and melodic,... Continue reading
Posted Aug 29, 2014 at Late Bloomer
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No surprise, I’m out in gorgeous SF for the annual gathering of the vFaithful — VMworld 2014. As before, it’s quite an experience, even for a jaded event veteran like me. Like a desert blooming after a rainstorm, Moscone Center is transformed into a fascinating technology experience, and — then — we wait until next year for it to happen all over again. I’m not capable of giving you a detailed report on everything that happened at VMworld — there’s way too much to cover. Instead, I thought I’d share with you what stood out for me personally. What A Great Place Many of you have been to Las Vegas for big industry events. Let me just say it — San Francisco has its special charms: food, culture, people, weather, scenery, etc. I’m always reminded by what a nice place it can be if you just let it wash over you. Unfortunately, there’s not a lot of time to be a tourist. For most people, VMworld is an all-day slog from Sunday through Wednesday, and perhaps Thursday. If you’re involved in IT infrastructure, this is the big show of the year. Yes, it’s about server virtualization. It’s also about networking,... Continue reading
Posted Aug 27, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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My corner of the IT industry is foisting a new concept on enterprise IT shops: software-defined storage. Supposedly, it’s TNT — the next thing! But we as vendors need to be held accountable for making our case. The existing storage kit seems to be doing the job; why would we need anything radically different? Where’s the big advantage, and — more importantly — is the expected gain worth the trouble? Unless we — as an industry — can make our case for the new technology, it will join the scrap heap of glittery ideas once considered and eventually discarded. But that won’t happen here — at least, that’s what I think. When Will You Hit The Storage Wall? Maybe software-defined storage doesn’t solve an immediate, burning problem for you right now, but — over time — many IT organizations will hit an interesting wall. Some are clearly there already, more are inevitably approaching. Here’s what the "storage wall" looks like: #1 -- Storage capacities continue to grow and grow; fueled by a potent combination of new information types (e.g. big data, IoT, rich content, etc.) and rapidly declining hardware costs. Gigabytes become terabytes and then petabytes and on to exabytes.... Continue reading
Posted Aug 20, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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"Music is like sex -- it's more fun when you do it with other people" There's only so much fun you can have playing music by yourself. At some point, most of us will venture out and try to join other like-minded musicians to be part of a band. Some... Continue reading
Posted Aug 18, 2014 at Late Bloomer
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As a younger version of my present self, I was supremely confident in what I knew to be true — especially when it came to all things enterprise IT tech. There was generally accepted wisdom about many things; to disagree with certain tenets made people question your expertise. But with age and experience, I realized that many of the “obvious truths” on which I had built my belief system were quickly becoming fallacies. Time for a new religion? No, not really — more of a never-ending appreciation of how the world really works. That means modifying old frameworks, and creating new ones. I often meet younger versions of myself, also supremely confident in their current beliefs. I don’t try and challenge them directly, but I do make the point that “obvious truths” in this business have a very short shelf-life indeed. Enterprise IT Matters Since I’ve spent most of my career working for IT vendors, it was natural for me to assume early on that I was selling to the most important people on earth: enterprise IT organizations. Imagine my disappointment when I started to realize that — in many situations — IT is just another supporting function, like HR,... Continue reading
Posted Aug 18, 2014 at Chuck's Blog
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I have always been a piano player first and foremost. Other keyboardists are all about organ, or synths, or sometimes a Rhodes fan here or there -- but my roots are firmly planted in the sounds of acoustic pianos. I am what I am. It's one thing when you're playing... Continue reading
Posted Aug 17, 2014 at Late Bloomer
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The more I meet different musicians, the more I realize most everyone's motivations for playing are different. Some people aren't quite sure why they do what they do. But if I'm going to be successful at interacting with them -- and making it work musically -- I'll sooner or later... Continue reading
Posted Aug 17, 2014 at Late Bloomer