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hollywood housewife
los angeles
from a one-stoplight town to a hollywood housewife
Recent Activity
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Happy Halloween! Pigtail chose her birds of paradise costume and on the right is my little lion man. The kids are in such a sweet spot right now. I'm drinking it up. I've been racing to finish the 30,000 words I set as a goal this month. By midnight tonight, I hope to be about 3,000 words short. I'm a little disappointed that I needed meet it entirely by October 31st (I will before next week, though), but I'm proud that I got as far as I did while blogging and hosting houseguests and having birthday celebrations for two kids.... Continue reading
Posted 3 hours ago at hollywood housewife
I appreciate these thoughts, Zandria, Thank you!
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That’s a Kate Spade gray leather tote. I’m not exactly sure the name of the style, but I bought it at the outlet, and I’m pretty sure that Kate Spade makes stuff specifically for their outlet stores.
Toggle Commented yesterday on rugged booties at hollywood housewife
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I bought a pair of snakeskin booties of the clearance rack at Anthropologie and they are surprisingly versatile. (I can't find them online anymore, but they have a great variety.) I can wear them with shorts and skirts (it's still warm here) or jeans of any cut. And the heel isn't high, so they're comfy. Once I started looking around, I saw these bohemian/rockstar boots everywhere. They're great for winter because they go with tights and leggings or all kinds of pants. They have more personality that just plain boots, don't you think? 1. TOMS desert cheetah suede wedge bootie... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at hollywood housewife
Hi Cheryl, I just want to defend my fellow bloggers for a minute. For those that recycle content or say something similar each season, I want to point out that it is EXTREMELY difficult to come up with new and original content all year every year. And for those that rely on the income, not posting anything at all isn’t an option. Also, while personal blogs to tend to have more loyal followers, I think a lot of the niche blogs (style, in particular) tend to have a lot of turnover in terms of readership, so repeating themselves might not be at such a detriment. I use a lot of Rstyle and amazon links. I do disclose these affiliate because, like you, I think it’s a mistake (not to mention illegal) not to. I have a disclosure in my sidebar and usually on the post. I take a lot of care with those links, though, and never link out to something if I truly don’t like it. Even using those links to a decent sized readership still doesn’t put my blog into a money-making category when I factor in all my time and expenses. I can’t say for sure how other bloggers treat their recommended links, but I have to believe their reputation would be a risk if they linked out to stuff that didn’t fit with the rest of their style. I really do think blogging is changing, which is why I put this conversation out there. Thank you for weighing in as a reader.
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That’s interesting about commenting on facebook. This happens quite a bit, that people comment on the Facebook thread instead of commenting on the post, and I’ve wondered why. It’s easier for me to keep the main conversation in one place, but now I hear you that it’s much easier to comment on FB than it is on a blog. Good to know!
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You’re like a bloggers dream, Darla! Thank you for that. I think it takes a blogger to know the value of supporting the numbers. Most of my readers are not bloggers, so they rightly have no idea what it means to me when people follow on all channels, or share my stuff. I don’t expect them too, of course, and I probably don’t ask them to enough. But that’s the blogging gold mine!
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REALLY good point made, April. I agree that it’s much harder to feel fully invested in a person by simply their social media presence. You’re right that those are just extensions of the blog, it’s the blog itself that is the REAL me. I’d almost forgotten that take on it. Thank you for sharing.
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I also unsubscribe when bloggers split their posts, making you click through from Feedly to read the end. As a blogger, I understand why they do it. As a blog reader, I refuse to go that far.
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Thank you, Melissa. I really appreciate this perspective. It makes the on-ness and on-ness of blogging feeling like a nice unfolding instead of a marathon that never ends.
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When you read the blog post in a reader, the blogs don’t get to count that as a page view (which is why bloggers split it, forcing people to click through), but you are counted as a subscriber. To get a better idea about a blogger’s stats, you have to look at the whole picture: subscribers (through a reader and through email), page view, social media following, etc. This is where it can get a bit tricky to discern the size or influence of a blogger, if you were trying to measure it. Some bloggers might have huge social media followings, but no page views, or the opposite. You can’t always tell at first glance, and I’ve learned to never make assumptions about it.
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Thank you for that, I take it as a high compliment. I’m a huge blog lover (obviously), but even I have taken to reading blogs less, too, because of the inconsistency and heavy ad content. This is such an interesting conversation.
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Oh, how I love Cup of Jo, too.
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The Young House Love disappearance hurt. I’ve read them for years and while I think their reasons must have been complicated, I also think it’s reflective of an internet culture that demands fresh content multiple times daily, trolls, and complaints of readers who want their entertainment to be completely free of sponsorship. The “Is Blogging Dead” conversation has been around for awhile now, but I do think that it was the YHL situation that brought it to a full roar.
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I do too, Kara. :)
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Not cliche, just part of the wave that’s happening. This conversation and feedback has been so helpful to me.
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REALLY good thoughts here, Lisa. Thanks for sharing. I knew several people at Allume this weekend, and I love the focus you described there. I think it’s a good one, especially for women who use blogging as an outlet and a ministry. What of the bloggers who need it to be more than that, though? I do think that the money-making aspect swung way too far to the center of blogging and blog conferences, but it would be disingenuous to omit it entirely. A return to story and connection is a great start, though. I’m so impressed at the inspiration Allume must have created.
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Thank you so much, Kim. I love what you have to say here. I do want to clarify that I’m in a very lucky spot to be able to pour into this thing the equivalent of a part-time job and not need it to pay my mortgage. I fully understand that is a luxury.
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This does help, Brandy. It also brings up an interesting spin: I wonder if the average blog reader of blogs similar to mine are just aging out. Like maybe they started reading blogs when they had more time (pre-kids, or at a cubicle job or something) and now life has changed in a way where blog reading is the first thing to go. Musing on that for a minute...
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Congratulations on your book deal! I know the numbers matter, that is the hardest part of the mind swirl you described. Is it worth it? Yes. Really? Maybe not. ‘Round and round I go. At the end of the day, though, I’m actually really passionate about blogging. Even though it can drive me insane. (And thank you for all you said.)
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This touched me, Rachel, thank you. Sometimes people meet us in real life and mention our kids by their blog names or say something about our family that they’ve seen online (in a non-creepy way, just because they feel like they know us) and it’s nice to know that people are invested in our story.
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Definitely ignore people who advise you to quit something you love.
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Twitter is definitely not for everyone. I don’t think very many blog readers follow me on twitter, but it is a place where I connect with a lot of other bloggers. It’s kind of like the internet water cooler. :)
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Thank you, Julianna! I agree with you that readers can smell authenticity a mile away. My readers surprise me all the time. I’m never tried to trick anyone online, but sometimes I veer into over explanation territory and it becomes real clear real quick that my readers know what I’m saying without me using so many words.
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Thank you for that, Frances. I subscribe via email to 6 or 7 of my very favorite blog, but have literally hundreds in my feed reader. Maybe that’s why I stopped using it. And just so you know, a subscriber is generally more valuable to a blogger than a single page view. So don’t worry about that. :)
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