This is IHahn's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following IHahn's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
IHahn
Connecticut, USA
History maven, especially European ancient history & book lover
Interests: literature, classical music, history, ancient history, photography, mysteries, fiction, nonfiction, roman history, ancient rome, resident home town
Recent Activity
Image
We are starting the new year off with a well known time travel novel that gets us to 2nd century CE Carnuntum! January 7 & 21 Household Gods by Judith Tarr & Harry Turtledove (eBooks only ouside the U.S.) This is a great site to explore the ancient town: Carnuntum, Reborn City of Emperors Newcomers: Chat room location (with instructions) at Skype IM. Continue reading
Posted Dec 12, 2014 at Roman History Books and More
Image
Join us in December for two mysteries: December 3 Persona Non Grata (Gaius Petreius Ruso Series #3) aka "The Root of all Evils" by Ruth Downie (link includes eBook. Less expensive used copies may be had at ABEbooks.com and elsewhere) => December 2 Update Robert Greaves found these two useful links: Barbarian let loose in Gaul with camera Nemausus (Nîmes) December 10 (because of Hanukkah) Roman Games (Plinius Secundus Series #1) by Bruce MacBain (link includes eBook) Continue reading
Posted Nov 23, 2014 at Roman History Books and More
Image
Get ready for an engrossing read! Wednesday, November 19 The Legate's Daughter: A Novel by Wallace Breem The only recommendation The Legate's Daughter should require is its author's name. Wallace Breem was one of the most gifted writers ever to turn his attention to the historical novel, with a mastery of descriptive writing, characterization, tone and mood rare indeed among those who work in the genre. The Legate's Daughter is as shrouded in rich, suggestive shadows as a Rembrandt masterpiece. Whether the setting is the slums of Rome or an African palace, the most striking scenes tend to take place at night, when those shadows grow darker and an unknown danger seems to lurk just out of sight. Those dangers steadily grow as the plot proceeds and suspense ratchets upwards. The Legate's Daughter Wallace Breem—some biographical notes Used copies may be had at ABEbooks.com and elsewhere. Also as eBook at Amazon. Newcomers are welcome. Information Continue reading
Posted Nov 8, 2014 at Roman History Books and More
Image
October 1 & 15, November 5: Livia: First Lady of Imperial Rome by Anthony Barrett (used copies may be had at ABEbooks.com and elsewhere) Also as eBook at Amazon and iTunes. The book has 222 pages of narrative text and 107 pages of appendices. The breakdown - sans appendices which may be read anytime - will be as follows: October 1: Preface, Part I (THE LIFE OF LIVIA), 1 - 4. October 15: through Part I (THE LIFE OF LIVIA), 5 ; Part II, (LIVIAN THEMES), 6 & 7. November 5: through the end of the narrative text. Continue reading
Posted Sep 22, 2014 at Roman History Books and More
Image
Our seond chat on Rome's Last Citizen: The Life and Legacy of Cato, Mortal Enemy of Caesar by Rob Goodman & Jimmy Soni will be on Wednesday, July 30. As some members did not have the book yet or needed a refresher read, we will basically discuss the entire book. New York Times Video Interview Plutarch's Parallel Lives: Cato the Younger Cato the Elder Pompey Julius Caesar Sallust: The War with Catiline Continue reading
Posted Jul 16, 2014 at Roman History Books and More
Image
Our next two chats February 19 & March 5 are texts by Cicero. Update March 2: There was some original confusion: On February 19 we discussed "Brutus: A History of Famous Orators," on March 5 it will be The Orator which is part of the same book. Brutus: A History of Famous Orators/The Orator at Gutenberg (downloadable to your tablet) Also availabe in print at Loeb Classical. "Cicero: A Portrait" by Elixabeth Rawson. Chat room location (with instructions) at Skype IM. Continue reading
Posted Feb 16, 2014 at Roman History Books and More
Image
This will our third and final chat, on February 5, about Empire (Rome Series #2) by Steven Saylor (link includes eBook): from Lucius: The Seeker, A.D. 93 through Marcus: The Sculptor (A.D. 113-141). These are my favorite parts of the novel. Continuing the saga begun in his New York Times bestselling novel Roma, Steven Saylor charts the destinies of the aristocratic Pinarius family, from the reign of Augustus to height of Rome’s empire. The Pinarii, generation after generation, are witness to greatest empire in the ancient world and of the emperors that ruled it—from the machinations of Tiberius and the madness of Caligula, to the decadence of Nero and the golden age of Trajan and Hadrian and more. Empire is filled with the dramatic, defining moments of the age, including the Great Fire, the persecution of the Christians, and the astounding opening games of the Colosseum. But at the novel’s heart are the choices and temptations faced by each generation of the Pinarii. Steven Saylor once again brings the ancient world to vivid life in a novel that tells the story of a city and a people that has endured in the world’s imagination like no other. Steven Saylor does... Continue reading
Posted Feb 3, 2014 at Roman History Books and More
Image
In our next chats, January 8 & 22, February 5, we'll discuss Empire (Rome Series #2) by Steven Saylor (link includes eBook) Continuing the saga begun in his New York Times bestselling novel Roma, Steven Saylor charts the destinies of the aristocratic Pinarius family, from the reign of Augustus to height of Rome’s empire. The Pinarii, generation after generation, are witness to greatest empire in the ancient world and of the emperors that ruled it—from the machinations of Tiberius and the madness of Caligula, to the decadence of Nero and the golden age of Trajan and Hadrian and more. Empire is filled with the dramatic, defining moments of the age, including the Great Fire, the persecution of the Christians, and the astounding opening games of the Colosseum. But at the novel’s heart are the choices and temptations faced by each generation of the Pinarii. Steven Saylor once again brings the ancient world to vivid life in a novel that tells the story of a city and a people that has endured in the world’s imagination like no other. To break the book down into three chats, it requires breaks in chapters: January 8: I. LUCIUS: The Lightning Reader to II.... Continue reading
Posted Dec 27, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
Resurrecting an old post ... Escultura "Saturnalia" en el Jardín Botánico de Buenos Aires, Ernesto Biondi Here are some links to Rome's big December festival, some courtesy N.S. Gill: Saturnalia - Celebrate the Saturnalia Saturnalia (Roman Holidays) December (Fasti) Saturnalia at Wikipedia => Macrobius: Saturnalia Image: Alma-Tadema's Ave, Caesar! Io, Saturnalia! and a how to … Pliny the Younger did not think much of the festivities: "...especially during the Saturnalia when the rest of the house is noisy with the licence of the holiday and festive cries. This way I don't hamper the games of my people and they don't hinder my work or studies." (Epistles 2.17.24) Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons IO, SATVRNALIA! Continue reading
Posted Dec 17, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
LacusCurtius - A Gateway to Ancient Rome, run by Bill Thayer, is one of the most informative websites on the subject. livius.org is operated by Jona Lendering. Together, they have a blog with news about their respective websites: New at LacusCurtius & Livius, as well as book reviews and other news. Enjoy! Related articles Roman Ruins HD for iPad is a terrific way to explore ancient Rome Continue reading
Posted Dec 15, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
On Wednesday, December 18 - our last chat of the year - we'll discuss A Dying Light in Cordoba (Marcus Didius Falco Series #8) by Lindsey Davis. "Marcus Didius Falco is ready to make new contacts and start a new career, and a dinner for the Society of Olive Oil Producers of Baetica seems like the perfect opportunity. But when two dinner guests are found beaten--one dead--Falco knows he cannot rest until he solves at least one more mystery." Off to Spain he goes. Since her father owns property in Baetica, a highly pregnant Helena tags along. Be ready for murder, mayhem, and fun. A reminder that we now chat on Skype IM. Instructions. Continue reading
Posted Dec 15, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
Sacred Games (Nicolaos Series #3) by Gary Corby on December 4 (also as eBook elsewhere) It is the Olympics of 460 BC. Nico's best friend, Timodemus, is a competitor in the pankration, the deadly martial art of ancient Greece. Timo is hot favorite to win. His only serious rival is Arakos from Sparta. When Arakos is found beaten to death, it is obvious Timodemus must be the killer. Who else could have killed the second-best fighter in all Hellas but the very best? The Judges of the Games sentence Timodemus to be executed in four days' time, as soon as the Sacred Games have finished. Complicating everything is the fact that Athens and Sparta are already at each other's throats, in the opening stages of a power struggle for control of Hellas. If an Athenian is found to have cheated at the Games by murdering a Spartan, it will be everything the hawks in Sparta need to declare open war the moment the Sacred Truce is over. And that's a war Athens cannot hope to win. Nico and his partner in sleuthing, the annoyingly clever priestess Diotima, have four days to save their friend and avert a war that would... Continue reading
Posted Nov 24, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
In November we are discussing Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, and the Genius of Leadership by Barry Strauss. (also as eBook) At the first chat, we completed chapter 3, "Resistance." Now for the rest! What I like about the book is that it does not give three different biographies but rather compares the three men on various subjects and issues. Review by N.S. Gill Lecture by Barry Strauss, November 2012 We are testing a new chat client since the problems with Google Talk are mounting. I will keep you advised, however, this chat will still be at G-Mail. Do not log log via Google Talk! Continue reading
Posted Nov 16, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
July updated: January 8 & 22, February 5 Empire by Steven Saylor (link includes eBook) February 19 & March 5 Cicero: Brutus: A History of Famous Orators: Gutenberg / Attalus If time allows: De Re Publica March 19 & April 2 Augustus: A Novel by John Williams (link includes eBook) April 23 (because of Passover), May 7 & 21 The Roman Triumph by Mary Beard eBook June 4 & 18 Hannibal's Children by John Maddox Roberts (used copies may be had at ABEbooks.com and elsewhere) Also as eBook at Amazon and iTunes. July 9 & July 23 (because of Independence Day and Irene's vacation schedule) Rome's Last Citizen: The Life and Legacy of Cato, Mortal Enemy of Caesar by Rob Goodman & Jimmy Soni (link includes eBook) August Recess September 3 & 17 The Philosopher Prince by Paul Waters October 1 & 15, November 5 Livia: First Lady of Imperial Rome by Anthony Barrett (used copies may be had at ABEbooks.com and elsewhere) Also as eBook at Amazon and iTunes. November 19 (Revised) The Legate's Daughter by Wallace Breem (used copies may be had at ABEbooks.com and elsewhere) Also as eBook at Amazon. December 3 Persona Non Grata (aka The... Continue reading
Posted Oct 25, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
Update 1 On November 6 & 20 we will discuss Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, and the Genius of Leadership by Barry Strauss. (also as eBook) Through CHAPTER THREE: Resistance What I like about the book is that it does not give three different biographies but rather compares the three men on various subjects and issues. Review by N.S. Gill Lecture by Barry Strauss, November 2012 We are testing a new chat client since the problems with Google Talk are mounting. I will keep you advised. Update 2: This chat will still be a Google Talk/G-Mail Continue reading
Posted Oct 25, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
Our next chat on Wednesday, October 16 will be A Murder on the Appian Way (Roma Sub Rosa Series #5) by Steven Saylor (also as eBook). While Steven Saylor told me that he does not participate in book chats, he said he welcomes any questions via e-mail. His website. Asconius on Cicero's Pro Milone Asconius lived about a century after Cicero and wrote commentaries on Cicero's speeches to help his sons understand them. Five of these have survived. They are not only interesting in their own right but also provide a mine of information about the turbulent history of the Ciceronian age. Our chat room location (with instructions) at Google Talk. Newcomers please contact Irene via that link. Continue reading
Posted Oct 13, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
On Wednesday, October 2 we are having our final chat on Rome: An Empire's Story by Greg Woolf (also as eBook). We were supposed to discuss through chapter 12 during the last chat, however, we only made it through 9! Let me suggest that we come to an agreement at the beginning of the chat which ones of chapters 10 through 18 we should emphasize. I will post some suggestions on Facebook as a keep reading and encourage others to do also. Our chat room location (with instructions) at Google Talk. Newcomers please contact Irene via that link. Continue reading
Posted Sep 26, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
On Wednesday, September 18 we are having the second of three online chats on Rome: An Empire's Story by Greg Woolf (also as eBook). Chapters 7 through 12. This is a very intersting book! I wish I had the time to explore all of Woolf's source material, listed at the end of each chapter as suggested rreadings. Our chat room location (with instructions) at Google Talk. Newcomers please contact Irene via that link. Continue reading
Posted Sep 14, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
In his Rome: An Empire's Story, Greg Woolf lists among his background suggested readings Fergus Millar's collective writings: "Rome, the Greek East, and the World." They can be had as e-book omnibus at the UNC Press: Fergus Millar's Rome, the Greek World, and the East, Omnibus E-book The Landmark 3-Volume Set That Transformed The Study Of The Roman Empire. Fergus Millar is one of the most influential contemporary historians of the ancient world. His essays and books, including The Emperor in the Roman World and The Roman Near East, have enriched our understanding of the Greco-Roman world in fundamental ways. In his writings Millar has made the inhabitants of the Roman Empire central to our conception of how the empire functioned. He also has shown how and why Rabbinic Judaism, Christianity, and Islam evolved from within the wider cultural context of the Greco-Roman world. This is a three-volume collection of Fergus Millar's essays, which transformed the study of the Roman Empire by shifting the focus of inquiry onto the broader Mediterranean world and beyond. Continue reading
Posted Sep 14, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
You will have to contact Mr. Murdoch directly.
1 reply
Image
After our August recess, will will be discussing Rome: An Empire's Story by Greg Woolf (also as eBook) in three chats, September 4 & 18, October 2. September 4: through Chapter 6: "Slavery and Empire" September 18: through Chapter 12: "Resourcing Empire" October 2: through the end Woolf lists source material at the end of each chapter. Lots of interesting stuff! Our chat room location (with instructions) at Google Talk. Newcomers please contact Irene via that link. Continue reading
Posted Jul 28, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
Cast Not the Day: A Novel of Love and Tyranny by Paul Waters (through the end) Also as eBook. It is the middle of fourth century AD, and the Roman empire has been ruled for a generation by Christian emperors. Three brothers – the sons of the emperor Constantine the Great – are joint rulers and ruthless rivals. Beyond its borders, the vast empire is threatened by foreign enemies. And now, at last, the Church, with the force of the state behind it, is moving to crush all opposition to its power. But in Britain there is resistance. Against this backdrop of civil war and disarray, Drusus, a young British nobleman of Roman birth, learns of the betrayal of his father by enemies at court. He faces the loss of all he has known. As his life is torn apart, he must decide who to trust, who to care for and who to fight; and he must make choices which will forge the man he will become. Cast Not the Day is a tale of love and loss, freedom and tyranny, and of man’s struggle to know himself, set against a world of chaos where faith and reason clash. Our... Continue reading
Posted Jul 13, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
D ue to the July 4th festivities and surrounding days, the chats have been moved to July 10 & 24 as we are taking off August anyway. Cast Not the Day: A Novel of Love and Tyranny by Paul Waters July 10 through Chapter 6, July 24 through the end. Also as eBook. It is the middle of fourth century AD, and the Roman empire has been ruled for a generation by Christian emperors. Three brothers – the sons of the emperor Constantine the Great – are joint rulers and ruthless rivals. Beyond its borders, the vast empire is threatened by foreign enemies. And now, at last, the Church, with the force of the state behind it, is moving to crush all opposition to its power. But in Britain there is resistance. Against this backdrop of civil war and disarray, Drusus, a young British nobleman of Roman birth, learns of the betrayal of his father by enemies at court. He faces the loss of all he has known. As his life is torn apart, he must decide who to trust, who to care for and who to fight; and he must make choices which will forge the man he will... Continue reading
Posted Jun 28, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
Cast Not the Day: A Novel of Love and Tyranny by Paul Waters is our July project (July 3 and 17). Update: July 3 through Chapter 6, July 17 through the end. Also as eBook. It is the middle of fourth century AD, and the Roman empire has been ruled for a generation by Christian emperors. Three brothers – the sons of the emperor Constantine the Great – are joint rulers and ruthless rivals. Beyond its borders, the vast empire is threatened by foreign enemies. And now, at last, the Church, with the force of the state behind it, is moving to crush all opposition to its power. But in Britain there is resistance. Against this backdrop of civil war and disarray, Drusus, a young British nobleman of Roman birth, learns of the betrayal of his father by enemies at court. He faces the loss of all he has known. As his life is torn apart, he must decide who to trust, who to care for and who to fight; and he must make choices which will forge the man he will become. Cast Not the Day is a tale of love and loss, freedom and tyranny, and of man’s... Continue reading
Posted Jun 20, 2013 at Roman History Books and More
Image
A reminder: Fire in the East (Warrior of Rome, Book 1) by Harry Sidebottom is due for final discussion on Wednesday, June 19, U.S. EDT. It is taking place in CE 255/256. "Fire in the East: Warrior of Rome serves as a vivid example of the best in historical fiction, where the genre serves to not only accurately inform its readers about the complexities of life and relationships between diverse cultures but imbues them with a passion to learn even more." Review by our friend Mary Harrsch. Our chat room location (with instructions) at Google Talk. Newcomers please contact Irene via that link. Continue reading
Posted Jun 12, 2013 at Roman History Books and More