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Besides Vincent Price, there are two more actors that play(ed) evil/bad/strange/deranged characters that from interviews and comments by other actors seem to be really nice people - Peter Lorre and Christopher Walken. I'm sure that Wil could add some more from the people he has worked with.
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I also had a teacher inform me that a poem had a specific symbolic meaning - I had written it and when I stated that the origin and meaning of the poem was completely different, I was told that the teacher's meaning was what I really felt subconsciously when I wrote it. That was one of the most important lessons I learned in high school. [This teacher was actually great - just a few incidents made me realize that the teacher was human.] Even though it is work for me to read Shakespeare, I love the plays - I thank my parents who took me to see Midsummer Night's Dream at the festival in Stratford, CT when I was about 12. It was magical! In 9th grade when I had to read R&J I hated the work to read it but appreciated it. Then the class saw the Zeffirelli version and it was great again for me. [having to parse the language and look up archaic words is too distracting for me (even when they are footnoted)- not looking up the words and just relying on context bothers me.]
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Wil declared: I'm a huge NPR geek, so getting to talk to John Moe for Marketplace ... was pretty cool. That brought back memories. I did a phone interview with Noah Adams back around 1990 - what a mix of excitement and terror at the same time (I was getting used to public speaking and had done a bunch of interviews and talks, but this was frigging NPR!!!). [Wil: I was being interviewed about the book I gave you at a book reading/signing for _Just a Geek_ in San Francisco many moons ago. You signed one for me and I signed one for you. You were great at sharing my excitement at this.]
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Unfortunately, some writers get embiggened egos and start to ignore or refuse to use editors. One famous writer (who I thought had great ideas, but a 6th grade writing style) seems to have stopped using an editor [symptoms include: writing that would fail English 101 and subplots that start and get abandoned without adding anything to the story or character development.]
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Put down that "Elements of Style" and back away.... Read this review of it to see why: http://chronicle.com/article/50-Years-of-Stupid-Grammar/25497 Two of my friends are professional editors and they both agree that "Elements..." is full of errors.
Toggle Commented Feb 10, 2010 on Wow, nice shirt . . . Moonpie. at WWdN: In Exile
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A writer friend has a habit of typing notes while talking to people on the phone. I can hear the keyboard. I used to think that he was processing e-mail or something mindless, but the pace of typing increases when the conversation gets interesting and decreases when it is routine. He often did this in person when I visited at work (a bookstore) - another clue was that he would do this for long stretches of time without glancing at the screen. I suspect he was transcribing dialog to study or to adapt for a project (and from his writing, he needed to work on that.) I never commented on this because I didn't want him to feel self conscious about it.
Toggle Commented Jun 24, 2009 on time to write at WWdN: In Exile
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kananik said "... point out a typo." A prof. at Towson commented (I got this from a commenter in a language and editing blog): "there is no such thing as typos. Only errors in proofreading." H. George Hahn, III.
Toggle Commented Apr 30, 2009 on talk about your dream of horses at WWdN: In Exile
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Wil wrote "...Maybe the idea was that Wesley would prove Picard wrong, with a big payoff at the end when Picard apologies or something and their relationship grows as a result. But all we get is one line in the cargo bay when Picard says, “Can you return to duty?”" I thought that one line was better than a long apology scene. Unfortunately, it was not preceded by a believable (or satisfying) cause for the apology. Plus, the scene wasn't well constructed. Done correctly - with the appropriate unspoken subtle interaction showing that both understand what happened - it could have been a powerful scene.
Toggle Commented Apr 28, 2009 on talk about your dream of horses at WWdN: In Exile
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But... speaking as a freelance musician myself (hell, as a creative type, period), ye olde "suck it up, walk it off" type responses to someone raising perfectly valid concerns about receiving proper accreditation just don't seem particularly helpful, sorry. I should have put a few more words in there to make my intent clearer when I wrote "deal with." I didn't mean "suck it up, walk it off"; I meant "doing everything you can to protect your career, health, art, and finances." I was trying to get at the concept that you have to be Jekyll and Hyde - aggressive and relentless in business when necessary yet calm and professional when creating and performing. I run a business with my wife and I have to do that with the work vs. business parts of the company. Sometimes I have only a few seconds to switch personalities - I'm not great at it, but I work at it.
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I'll comment on a few things Zoe wrote - I lived with a professional musician for many years and have been friends with many more (some of them were actually able to quit the day jobs) I also saw the other end of ASCAP sampling at my college radio station. ASCAP does sample stations and use statistics to distribute the royalties - the problem is that when there are few plays of a musician, they either get missed completely or once in a while get logged and then show as a much higher play rate. NPR would have to be one of the stations being sampled at the time for the play to show up. I think the 10% is much too high - the sampling rate needed for the mainstream music is much lower and ASCAP isn't going to spend lots of money to do a proper sampling to represent the fringe artists. [When our station was logging for ASCAP, I made sure that the underrepresented artists got played on my show.] The NPR _have to_ vs. _should do_ has been discussed already - the nice thing is that with the internet, it gets discussed and new people can find out even if NPR forgets to credit the piece. As for Zoe feeling slighted and unrecognized, she needs to develop a thick skin if she intends to continue in music. [Plus have good legal and accounting advice.] She will get used, abused, cheated, slighted, plagiarized, lied to, loved, hated, praised, insulted, etc., etc. Most of the people she will have to deal with don't care about the music or playing fair - just making money or wielding power. (except fans, and they can be problematic in their own way) The musicians I knew all learned to deal with the nasty part of being an artist and enjoy the creative muse (like Wil has). The unpleasant stuff hurts, but you cannot let it get in the way of your performance. [some who were talented enough to go professional couldn't endure the nasty and competitive part of the business so they went back to playing as a hobby.] Thanks Zoe for the music. Thanks Wil for introducing me to the music. - - - Another artist who was playing duets with a computer - - Bela Fleck was playing Dueling Banjos against a Mac at concerts in the late 80s. He also used a delay circuit to play a duet with himself a few seconds in the past.
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RE: "audio footnotes" I've always called this "asides." It sounds a little more theatrical, however, "audio footnotes" is easier to understand. The American Heritage Dictionary definition of "aside" included "parenthetical departure; a digression." "parenthetical departure" has a nice connotation of taking a trip.
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RE: "audio footnotes" I've always called this "asides." It sounds a little more theatrical, however, "audio footnotes" is easier to understand. The American Heritage Dictionary definition of "aside" included "parenthetical departure; a digression." "parenthetical departure" has a nice connotation of taking a trip.
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Wil, Your "Plan B" costume picture has made it to a Russian random picture page: http://www.dezinfo.net/post/8702/3 Any other sightings?
Toggle Commented Nov 6, 2008 on plan b at WWdN: In Exile
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Wil, Your "Plan B" costume picture has made it to a Russian random picture page: http://www.dezinfo.net/post/8702/3 Any other sightings?
Toggle Commented Nov 6, 2008 on plan b at WWdN: In Exile
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Wil said: "you have to find ways to enjoy auditions..." Back when I did theater lighting semi-professionally I knew an actor who got this concept - He was short pudgy late 40s guy and he auditioned for "Gypsy" by doing the "Bump it with a Trumpet" part from the song "You Gotta Have A Gimmick." He had the guts to wear a gold bikini for the audition. He got the part of Herbie.
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Wil said: "you have to find ways to enjoy auditions..." Back when I did theater lighting semi-professionally I knew an actor who got this concept - He was short pudgy late 40s guy and he auditioned for "Gypsy" by doing the "Bump it with a Trumpet" part from the song "You Gotta Have A Gimmick." He had the guts to wear a gold bikini for the audition. He got the part of Herbie.
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Damn you Wil...now I'm going to spend most of today checking out the music and won't get anything done....then my boss (who is my wife) will be mad at me. I already found a list of the "25 essential ambient" that includes a surprise for me... Miles Davis - In a Silent Way. Another Miles Davis to find... Fortunately, my boss (wife) doesn't stay mad long, so I won't be sleeping in the yard... As for Heather's comment: "...I bet more than 3 girl creatures threw them selves at you at Pax this year alone...you probably just miss the subtler ones, and only recognized 3...." That happened to me in college a couple of times - I found out later from friends.
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Damn you Wil...now I'm going to spend most of today checking out the music and won't get anything done....then my boss (who is my wife) will be mad at me. I already found a list of the "25 essential ambient" that includes a surprise for me... Miles Davis - In a Silent Way. Another Miles Davis to find... Fortunately, my boss (wife) doesn't stay mad long, so I won't be sleeping in the yard... As for Heather's comment: "...I bet more than 3 girl creatures threw them selves at you at Pax this year alone...you probably just miss the subtler ones, and only recognized 3...." That happened to me in college a couple of times - I found out later from friends.
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Back in the dark ages when I played D&D, we had an informal (an never actually discussed)policy that in the early stages of a campaign a very useful (one use) object would be found - one that would serve the purpose of rule 17b. The party could then resurrect, teleport, decimate or something that would save the party. The nice thing about implementing rule 17b this way is that it became part of the game, not an outside redo.
Toggle Commented Sep 13, 2008 on Gaming with kids: rule 17b at WWdN: In Exile
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Back in the dark ages when I played D&D, we had an informal (an never actually discussed)policy that in the early stages of a campaign a very useful (one use) object would be found - one that would serve the purpose of rule 17b. The party could then resurrect, teleport, decimate or something that would save the party. The nice thing about implementing rule 17b this way is that it became part of the game, not an outside redo.
Toggle Commented Sep 13, 2008 on Gaming with kids: rule 17b at WWdN: In Exile
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czeano posted| "I'd be surprised if rms ever *washed* his hair, let alone had it cut." It did happen occasionally, but I should have said "trim." I knew one such honored demi-goddess. The person wielding the +17 scissors of shaping also was endowed with +42 feminine charm and sweetness.
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czeano posted| "I'd be surprised if rms ever *washed* his hair, let alone had it cut." It did happen occasionally, but I should have said "trim." I knew one such honored demi-goddess. The person wielding the +17 scissors of shaping also was endowed with +42 feminine charm and sweetness.
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RE: "the twisty little maze of passages" ... and you are an old geek if you explored the twisty little maze of passages after midnight on a terminal in a friend's office connected to a mainframe that only allowed access to games at night. Bonus geek points if Stallman was sometimes in that building when you played. Even more bonus geek points if you know someone who gave Stallman a haircut.
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RE: "the twisty little maze of passages" ... and you are an old geek if you explored the twisty little maze of passages after midnight on a terminal in a friend's office connected to a mainframe that only allowed access to games at night. Bonus geek points if Stallman was sometimes in that building when you played. Even more bonus geek points if you know someone who gave Stallman a haircut.
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"That I wrote in vi because I couldn't find the text editor in emacs." I had to brush away a lot of cobwebs to get that joke. "There's one other thing: don't ever take for granted the kindness and generosity of experienced people who are willing to help you, and when you're finally in a position to do the same for other people, do it." Also, graciously accept kindness and generosity from everyone who offers it; you are likely to find that the person you least expect to has the critical piece of advice or information (even if they don't realize it). I was facing a big decision and a secretary said to me "you're scared." - I thought about it and she was correct. I wouldn't admit to myself that I was scared -- that realization changed my life (25 years later, I am still grateful for that comment - it put me on the roller coaster life path instead of the scenic, predictable, boring tram. I had "interesting times," survived with minimal damage, and am very happy now). As for luck, (to paraphrase my mentor "Doc") - when you get a little luck, exploit the hell out of it!
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