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Ismail Elshareef
Los Angeles, CA
Geek. Visionary. Avid Reader. Thinker. Entrepreneur. Photographer. Aficionado of the The Arts, Fascinated by Culture.
Interests: Too many to list!
Recent Activity
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The man who has become synonomous with "WOW" is mourned tonight by the entire world; by so many people young and old. No one had touched so many so profoundly like Steve has with his imagination and beautiful products, one of which I'm using right now to compose this post.... Continue reading
Posted Oct 5, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
Several weeks back, I gave this presentation at the HTML5 Los Angeles meetup group. A couple of days back, I was humbled to see it featured on SlideShare. There's plenty of talks about the technical aspects of HTML5 but not much about its business value. This presentation sheds light on... Continue reading
Posted Oct 3, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
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Startups are a "human institution" first and foremost. If the right team isn't in place, you do not have a startup. Nurture those talents and don't waste their time. Only then will the trappings of success adorn your business and you. Continue reading
Posted Sep 30, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
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On my back home from London a couple of months back, I stood in the immigration line for 45 minutes, which was a first for me. Normally, I breeze through but that day several flights arrived at the same time and the lines were crazy. Several weeks after that I got a call from American Express asking me if I was interested in Global Entry. I didn't know the program existed before that call. Evidently, American Express Platinum members are credited the $100 application fee necessary to apply for the program (video.) Knowing that I'll be doing more international traveling in 2012 for both business and pleasure, I said, "yes, I'm interested." Continue reading
Posted Aug 20, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
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This is a fascinating book. Yes it is a great read full of suspenseful moments, and at times horrific details, of the murders by H. H. Holmes in Chicago circa 1890s. Yes it is a great book about the Columbus World's Fair that was built in Chicago in 1893 by America's greatest architects. Yes it is entertaining and yes it is historic. But what makes this book fascinating to me is the fact that it's a case study of entrepreneurship in America in the late 1800s. Continue reading
Posted Jul 16, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
Lyle Fong, the CEO and Co-Founder of Lithium: “Active Facebook users at some point face a conundrum – either they don’t accept friend requests from all of their coworkers, acquaintances and distant family members and risk being viewed as elitist, or they accept all requests to be nice, but then... Continue reading
Reblogged Jul 14, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
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This is a followup to my previous post on Google+. Here's a very simple illustration that explains what I mean by the "actionable" social web: The image below shows a post shared by Steven Levy on Google+. The post talks about a book he recently wrote called, "In The Plex."... Continue reading
Posted Jul 8, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
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A couple of weeks back, I wrote about relevancy and the future of user experience on Facebook. I argued that relevancy in Facebook was broken and suggested a way to fix it. Two days ago, Google released its newest social product, Google+. As I read through the Tech Crunch post... Continue reading
Posted Jun 30, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
Oh no. This is not good. Will America still lead if it continues to stem the flow of raw, ambitious and hungry foreign talent? The answer is NO. What's really sad is that instead of stopping the illegal, poor masses flooding this country every day, setting us back culturally and... Continue reading
Posted Jun 23, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
Native mobile applications will soon become a fad and the tried and tested Web will prevail. The rapidly maturing HTML5 coupled with Google's Latitude will dominate eventually. Web developers couldn't stop talking about HTML and its evolution during the 1990s. New features were usually tempting, though not always workable, and... Continue reading
Posted Jun 23, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
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One of my all-time favorite albums, and evidently, "the best-selling French-language album of all time", is getting re-released on December 1st with remastered tracks and video content. Originally released in 1995, this album, and particularly the song "Pour Que Tu M'Aimes Encore," were the reason I asked my dad to... Continue reading
Posted Jun 23, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
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The iPad Made a Kindle Believer Out of Me My Amazon Review I resisted buying a Kindle for the longest time, and that's saying something coming from me being an avid reader and a gadget feigned all in the same measure. My argument was that nothing would ever replace the... Continue reading
Posted Jun 22, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
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I was lucky enough to see the American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765-1915 exhibit at LACMA in Los Angeles almost 14 months ago. It's definitely one of my favorite exhibits, surpassed only by the Machu Picchu exhibit that was held at the Natural History Museum several years earlier. Below... Continue reading
Posted Jun 22, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
Thanks, Matt. The app we created simply asked for permission to access the user's stream and status (read_stream, user_status respectively.) https://developers.facebook.com/docs/authentication/permissions/ The problem with that was that we had to basically interpret each content item in the stream to figure out if it was related to automotive. That wasn't easy since the link object that's exposed through the Open Graph doesn't give you much. That's why Howard and I started thinking about the best way to do this and we reached the conclusion that only a restructuring of the data will resolve this issue. Also, it seems like a the next logical thing to happen considering the push for structured data by Google. Facebook has a golden opportunity to truly be the ultimate destination on the web. If I can transact on Facebook, why would I leave it?! This won't hurt the other companies that partner with Facebook. On the contrary, it will boost their conversions and help the business grow. The idea of bringing traffic to your site is dying fast. The future is to be part of an ecosystem that works, and today that ecosystem is Facebook. Power up your APIs and join forces with them. At the end of the day, it's the user experience that'll matter. Are you into machine learning these days? Have you spoken to Paddy about it? He's been looking into it too. Good to hear from you, man :-) Cheers, Ismail
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Right now, relevant content is discovered on Facebook by chance. My ability to find relevant content to me is depending on 1) the frequency in which my friends share content and 2) the time at which the content is shared and 3) the time at which I check my wall. All three conditions have to align for me to see that one piece of content that's relevant to me. It sucks, doesn't it? If I'm willing to sift through countless irrelevant posts from my friends, the least of my expectations is that the relevant posts are brought to the top of my wall where I can easily see them. But how do you define "relevant?" Continue reading
Posted Jun 18, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
Ismail Elshareef has shared their blog Ismail Elshareef's Blog
Jun 17, 2011
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I was lucky enough to be at the inaugural Inspire Conference that took place in London earlier this week. Over two days, some of the most influential and inspiring experts in technology, entrepreneurship, innovation and creativity (many of whom spoke at TED many times,) took to the stage and attempted... Continue reading
Posted Jun 10, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
Hi Thad, Thanks for the feedback. You are absolutely correct. The solution we devised worked great for us precisely because we "only" use doubleclick ads. We haven't had the chance to look into the other ad networks to see how they fare on this system, but would love to collaborate on that. I like your alternative solution and I think it's cleaner. I'll give it a whirl :-) Thanks again for the feedback! Cheers, Ismail
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A Look at How Sharing Defines The Success of Businesses in the Future The book discusses the increasingly recurring themes of openness and platform that have been discussed in other books like Open Leadership by Charlene Li and Where Good Ideas Come From by Steven Johnson. The core premise of... Continue reading
Posted Mar 31, 2011 at Ismail Elshareef's Blog
I'm so bummed I missed that keynote. I'll check the infoQ site for the video later. You said, "if the idea is not working don't agonize over it, kill it and move on." I've always found it difficult to determine whether the idea itself is not working or some aspects of it aren't. Is it the idea itself or how I'm prototyping it that's not working? Is it the idea itself that's not working or is it just outside what Steven Johnson calls the "adjacent possible"? Is it not working now but could be working 5 or 10 years from now? How do you distinguish "good" ideas that aren't possible today for reasons A, B, and C from downright bad ideas? What do we look for to help us make that distinction? Apple was experimenting with what eventually became the iPhone for 6 years before the product first hit the market. I'm pretty sure the idea in its first iterations wasn't really working but they continued iterating over it and now we have what some might argue to be an "indispensable" product. What made Apple continue its efforts and not toss the whole thing out? I'm not really sure there is a clear answer to this, but it might be worthwhile to compile a list of "signs that your idea sucks" to allow people to identify the telltale signs of really bad ideas that just won't work. Ever.
Toggle Commented Nov 11, 2010 on What I learned about Pretotyping at 'Ehu Kai
Maybe another way of thinking about is asking the following question: what are the unacceptable outcomes when a service request times out or fails? Maybe by clearly identifying what we "don't" want to happen we can find out what the best solution is.
Toggle Commented Nov 11, 2010 on What I learned about Software Design at 'Ehu Kai
Great roundup! I agree that Lesson 1 (run your services as a remote service from the service client) was a big revelation, considering how unintuitive it was. Also, Lesson 5 (caching) could address any performance implications that might arise from implementing remote services. So in a way, the drawback to Lesson 1 is taken care of by Lesson 5. Randy Shoup of eBay made a statement in one of his presentations that I thought was very interesting. He said, "the consumer needs to be able to recover when its dependencies are down." If an application (i.e. consumer) is using a remote service, how could it recover gracefully when that service is down? Could a local cache at the consumer layer be an effective failover mechanism, especially for read-only service calls? Should it just stop working and notify the user that an error has occurred? These are some of the questions we'll have to tackle as we open up our platform next year. The fact that we expect 3rd-party developers to use our services in a way answers your question about how much visibility the developer needs to have into the architecture of our services. I think that answer is: none. All the developer needs to care about is what methods to call and what data is returning and in what format. The fun details should be hidden, I think.
Toggle Commented Nov 11, 2010 on What I learned about Software Design at 'Ehu Kai
Ismail Elshareef is now following Rob Paterson
Nov 1, 2010
Ismail Elshareef is now following malcolmgladwell
Oct 20, 2010
Ismail Elshareef is now following Walt Grayson
Oct 20, 2010