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Jacques René Giguère
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The success of the Belgian imperialist project in the Congo! Like the murder of ten millions people? Oh yeah we got rubber.
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genauer: "I need more german ICBMs". Exactly what France, from the 4th Republic on(De Gaulle had nothing to do with the inception of nukes) realized. In fact Joliot-Curie was already working on A-bomb plans in the '30's. If nobody will mess with North Korea, it will not be because of its huge stock of rolling junk...
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As Majromax noted, what is defense spending? In order to assuage its pacifist population Japan massaged its budget in wonderful ways: pension and medical care for soldiers are in civilian budgets, military airports are shared with civilian trafic, if only one light plane a year, and so building and upkeep are civilian and of course science research as well. So, with "1%" of GDP on defense, Japan manage to have the world's 4th largest navy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_navies_by_displacement With no aircraft carriers, just a 19 500 tons "helicopter destroyer" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JS_Izumo So with Army and Air Force. Sorry, "Self-defense Force"...
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Money, cowrie shells or script, was formalized when the village grew too big and exceeded the Dunbar limit.
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Salted fish eggs coming through the Pontic region? That's definitely caviar.
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Never forget that Churchill ordered authorities in the Channel Island to collaborate with the German occupiers and forbade resistance activities...
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For more candian context,IIRC the late great Harry G. Johnson wrote about optimal structures for sports leagues, taking NHL as example.Too busy grading to search for links but feel free...
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Some fast thoughts from the airport lounge. Baby boomers (1946-1964) were the one to invent the "sexual revolution", that is women lowering their standards viz monogamy and shortening their skirts. By 1983, popular magazine like Newsweek (who did an issue on that) talked about a new conservatism, that is younger women born after 63 pairing with men born slighly earlier ( thus in greater numbers). No new morality, just basic supply and demand. Birth rates plumeted during the Depression, thus this generation (my parents) having the great success of the 30 Glorious and bemoaning how the young can't make it like they did. All of this is clasic Easterlin (with more numbers.) Better and more available porn may not be the best substitute for real relationship but if it's the only thing that relative income and population ratio leaves a generation, they'll have to make do. As for the men-women ratio on campus, there is LTG "lesbians till graduation"...
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Thanks Frances. I already used it in a class this morning.
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Never forget that the guys at the top of the distribution always lived elsewhere, from the HBC in London to the oil companies in Houston. Canada always had equality among the peons...
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Two things about Caplan. He writes for the US. Was it Miles Corak (correction much appreciated ) who said that the difference between Canada and the US is that in Canada what matters is what you study and in the US is where you study? The signaling effect of Harvard vs South Mississipi àt Tupelo is much bigger than McGill vs Memorial (maybe because the objective "quality" is more equaly distributed between the Cdn universities). And what if his thesis was just "Let's justify pulling out one more ladder in a fast ossyfying society in which I am a privileged member?
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To add to confusion, the misallocation classification of public vs private sector jobs is sometimes significant. In QC, cégeps professors are lumped in with high-school teachers even though they must hold much higher qualifications (economists, lawyers, engineers and such). We re told we are well paid for teachers even though the hiring pool is definitely not the same (no wonder we have recruitment problems).
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In Québec a slaughter house announced that it would recruit from Mauritius. Canada doesn't suffer from austerity, unemployment is at an historic low with participation rate also at an historic high. So: no charging customers the value of the product and no investment in technology. Immigration is clearly a tool to prevent wages from rising and even worse garanteeing a low productivity future.
And what if the problem was that private sector employees were earning too little?
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There is also "Nickeled and dimed" by Barabara Ehrenreich. And there was a similar book by a french journalist a few years ago. The sense of tourism from the journalist is real. I remember working in some insane job in the overheated stuffed basement of an hospital when I was a student. The difference in morale between the soon to be parloed students and the lifers quiet desparation was staggering.
Toggle Commented Feb 21, 2018 on Hired: a review at Stumbling and Mumbling
Humanitarian work attract those who want to redeem themselves of whatever demon they have or think they have. Sometimes a substitute for chemical addiction. Especially for women (men enlist in the Foreign Legion.)
To be young when Diana Rigg and Alexandra Bastedo ruled the waves... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=spgUz6yQSuE
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MF: We can also invest in non-haircut sector productivity so that we can transfer the economised resouces back to haircut. Which is a good part of what happened in manufacturing to service transition in the 20th century.
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It remain to be explained why 1923 hyperinflation experience got ingrained into prior but not the 1930-1933 unemployment despite the far worse consequences.
As the old Crusade saying: "He will be doubly useful, there by its presence, here by its absence." Despite being hyped up in Britain, as it was its only real theater of war in 1940-41, North Africa was a minor sideshow. The German troops were not called Deutsche Armee Korps for nothing. And 8th Army was a trumped up designation for publicity purpose as its strenght was barely above a corps. Rommel as 7th Pz division commander had a good run of luck in June 1940 (plus Pervitin). He showed offensive spirits and good improvisation (which he had showed in WWI and publicized in "Infantry attacks") but had the French Army not being already broken it probably would have been an overall disaster for the XV Pz Korps and Hoth Armee.
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Rommel was a good Corps commander but no more. Ambitious beyond his capacities. And yes , AH liked him a lot. Which made him very independant from the chain of command, undesirable in a subordinate. Sometimes for good, as when, after Bir Hakeim, he refused to execute French Legionnaires who were Germans, Spanish or Jewish despite a direct order from AH.
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If you are not the issuer of the global currency, mercantilism is the only logical conclusion. The problem with DJT is not a misunderstanding of trade but of money. And of course, given that resources are not fungible and not Ohio worker can be transmogrified into a Silicon Valley programmer, his policies and politics make sense. That they are destructive is an unfortunate side effects.
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I concur with the above. The only way the "bill" can be paid is by the EU buying british goods. Either Britain is at full employment and pay through reduced consumption. Or it is not at FE and yes you have costless QE and why didn't the Tories didn't do it already?
Alexander Graham Bell, as befit a genius, took it on himself to install 2 telephones in his lab for his first call. And in Canada, the first two were between the offices of the Prime Minister and the Governor General who, at that time, mattered.
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Nick:"Mortgages may be an exception, because they can be very long term. But maybe mortgages are different, because they are secured by an even longer term asset?" Fat lot of good it did to the Spanish economy. No runaway gunmint profligacy, all seriously backed private investments. Trichet and Schaüble still managed to wreck the country. And us usual, it may lead to the normal conclusion of economic mismanagemnt, civil-ethnic war.
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