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Jacques René Giguère
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Lucas and Sargent got a Nobel. Neither Baumol or Alchian. Twice the tears. Enuf said.
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The Éco-musée du Fier monde (to which I referd recently) will have a new exposition beginning MAy 18 on the theme Nourrir le quartier, nourrir la ville (feeding the borough, feeding the town) http://ecomusee.qc.ca/evenement/nourrir-le-quartier-nourrir-la-ville/
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Mussolini didn't make the train run on time. He was a bully and people believed him when he told them to believe. Under every incompetent dictature, the people always say:"Ah thing would work so well if only the Great One knew!"
Toggle Commented Apr 26, 2017 on The demand for bastards at Stumbling and Mumbling
Lactose intolerance and cheese. "White cheese fresh cheese, cottage, ricota, bocconcini are not cheese but dairy products. Cheese happens when lactose is consumed (it takes 3-4 days) and the stuff begins to hardens and then the second chain of the triglycerides saponifies. Chemically, it os still a fat. But the digestive system doesn't treat as fat. Hence the french-mediterranean paradox. Other causes as well.
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The Écomusée du fier monde , a Montréal museum about working class life (french speakers will appreciate the pun in the name...) had an exposition a few years ago about milk in Montréal. https://ecomusee.qc.ca/collections/collections-ecomusee/le-lait-a-montreal/ And the Guaranteed Pure Milk is a beloved Montréal landmark https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guaranteed_Pure_Milk_bottle
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"Sheepskin effect": You're only as good as your last record. You can go out of HS with a bang: "Mom I graduated!" or out of college with a whimper:"Mom, I failed at university..." There are medals for bravery and others for service but there is no diploma for two years of study (though some universities will tranform your fisrt two years into a certificate) :"Mom I have my degree!"
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Frances to cm: would it be because those who never tried have a better understanding of their abilities, a cognitive trait they can use all their life or are those who fail to complete are so marked by failure they get discouraged for a long time?
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Given that the federal monies are not mined from a magical fountain but come from taxes collected in the various provinces, most of the transfer, especially for Tier I provinces,is merely taxes collected in your own juridiction and given back with strings attached. Only Tier II provinces, all of them samall and insignificant in the grand scheme of things, receive something significant. What Tier I receive is now mostly a small compensation for their industrial economy being harmed by the oil curse. Which give rise to the toxic political meme of "(Select your favorite richer province) pays for (select your most despised slightly-less rich province)".
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Bizarre that the taxis I take have a credit card machine...
Toggle Commented Apr 1, 2017 on L'affaire Potter at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative
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The scene in HMS Ulysses in which sailors from a torpedoed ship cannot be saved as no one can stop the Arctic convoy and Ulysses ram them so they drown in the wake...
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July 27 1942. French maquisard Valentin Feldman is shot by the Germans. His last wordsto the firing squad: "Imbéciles c'est pour vous que je meurs!" "Imbeciles! It's for you that I die!"
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The big metropolises gaining in international migrants (plus an extremely arrogant intellectual class) while losing their domestic populations outwards is happening all over the western world (except Japan but then remember Kuznets: "There are four kinds of countries in the world: developed countries, undeveloped countries, Japan and Argentina".) In the current political climate, it is not ultimately a good thing.
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The pill didn't much to do. with it. It's merely another,maybe easier, mean of regulating your fertlity that you wished to regulate in the first place. (It's a family blog, so we'll skip the details...) In my own town, the college is situated at the edge of the city on a stupefyingly large site surrounded by a forest. It was supposed to be many times larger and would have been in the downtown area had the population reached the 300 K that was envisionned (we're merely 25K...) It also means problems with stagnating water in the main pipes as the flow is too slow in the too large pipes. It also has some other oddities such as if you go up a few kmona desolate rocky strreet, you suddenly find a large unpaved road six lane wide. It was supposed to link a luxury suburb of 150 K inhabitants to aforementionned downtown. Never paved as the auburbs wasn't built. Probably the world's largest forest trail.
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Whatever the financing, waste is waste. The US 2000's housing boom was privately financed. It ended up so well.
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This is of course routinely done in Europe and Canada. When I did my B.Econ. (not grad. school...) a course on Input-output matrices and modeling was compulsory. At the 2011 annual congress of the Association des économistes québécois (Québec Economists Association) we had Dale Jorgenson as guest speaker. He began his talk thus :"If I was a québécois or canadian economist, I would use an input-output matrix and be done in 20 minutes. But I am an american and it will yake me two hours. Sorry." Audience heartily laugh.
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"A retreat into populism and trade barriers will eventually reveal itself for what it really is – the road to slower growth, poverty and even greater inequality –" So did bolchevism. It took 70 years to find out. And the result was Putinism. OTOH, it was not bad that economics is the dismal science, given the way Carlysle thought...
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I strongly recommend that book "Social traps and the problem of trust" by Bo Rothstein It was inspired by a Russian asking Rothstein, a swedish politicologist:"How can we transform Moscow into Stockholm?" The answer is it took a long time to transform Stockhom into Stockholm. Few people realise how Scandinavia was a bacward,corrupt and badly governed,administered and managed till the early XXth century compared to more southern Europe (the hard-working, well governed Nordics is a recent myth according to Nordics themselves....) The review by Elinor Olson is excellent. https://www.amazon.ca/Social-Traps-Problem-Trust-Rothstein/dp/0521612829/ref=sr_1_18?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1483203930&sr=1-18&keywords=the+problem+of+trust
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There were federal hospitals for veterans in Québec City and Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue in western Montréal (there may have been others). The one in QCity was transfered to the province somwhere in the early '70's to become an hospital for the Université Laval (not to be confused with the Hôpital Laval a few kms away. The one in Montréal was recently transfered and became a CHSLD, specialising in chronic care as this what is has been transformed by the passage of time.
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There was one in Montréal https://archivesdemontreal.ica-atom.org/marine-hospital-18 and one in Québec City,though it seems that responsibility was unclear and may have varied from time to time http://www.banq.qc.ca/ressources_en_ligne/intruments_rech_archivistique/hopitaux/marine.html
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Gifts must be reciprocal as they create a relationship.. When we render a small service, like holding a door, the beneficiary says "Thanks" to which we reply"That's nothing." It indicates that no relationship is created as there is no expectation of a future exchange. Market transaction are not expected to create a relationship,though mutual satisafaction is nice and can induce the participants to favor one supplier-client over another in the long run. A gentleman can invite a lady to a restaurant and theater (the first two part of a date being alimentation and distraction leading hopefully to the third part , affection.) We don't give money. You can't offer money. If you do, you're not a gentleman. If she accept, she's not a lady. The non-money to money, the reciprocal to non-reciprocal spectrum is large and diverse and varies from society to society, including animal ones. (Male chimpanzees are known to kill vervet monkeys in front of female chimps and offering them the meat. It seems the killing is the distraction part of the event and eating is the alimentation. Affection follows.)
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"Nor do they bargain": the rule is you don't do accounting for gifts. Then you if do accounting and if the accounting is not vaguely equal, allowing for temporary fluctuations, you stop the exchanges. "Gifts" may go from the strong to the weak, showing power. They may go from the eak to the strong, showing submission. Gifts may be equal, showing equality. Gifts are transactions that exclude money (except from a grown-up to a young child.) Money is excluded because it is too easy, too obvious and prevent the giver from showing how well it knows what is really pleasing to the recipient. Gifts are a way of testing the level and strength of a relationship. They must be appropriate. A gift may be too small or too large. Both of those cases may hurt the relationship, even break it.
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My nephews & nieces had a bank account while very young. They saw adults using debit and credit cards, buying online and using ApplePay. As one of them told me (he was 5 at the time) "credit cards are for paying things and having debts." I asked him if he wanted a card. He snapped back ":Uncle, that's your hotel key." I admit they're bright, as they are from a high socio-economic background and share part of my genes but still, at worst, they are just a few years ahead of the rest. My students barely carry cash. They use it at the cafeteria (and maybe with their friendly provider in the basement locker hall where no staff goes...).
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Nick: so with my first card. 1973. For my first trip to Blighty (and Scotland too : https://www.hw.ac.uk/schools/textiles-design/. in Galashiels.)
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"We grew up with currency". And we adapt. People no longer try to cover an overdraft by writing a cheque because they understand chequing accounts. My students rarely use currency. They use debit card and Apple Pay and whatnot. I am not sure if they understand that it's only bit on a computer but it's no longer money is "paper with the face of the Queen in the right of canada."
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Despite mouthing pseudo-communist absurdities, he was first and foremost a typical incompetent south american caudillo. As if Batista had learned russian. The hostility from the US had nothing to do with his political views but held from the deep-seated wish of the Southern politicians to control the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribeans, to establish new slave states. The activities of the Golden Crescent Society never really ceased. And basing the idea that Cuba was the richest South American country based on the number of TVs is funny given that they were mostly in hotel rooms, which Cuba, aka America's bordello, had far more than any other SA countries.
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