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Jacques René Giguère
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Given that Duceppe seeks followers only in french QC (in the West Island and ROC, if you could be an anti-follower, I am sure he would get some), the 86000 translate into almost 350K. Given that Twitter is less popular among francos than anglos, I just wonder what it might mean...
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Dress codes can adapt. I remember, in te late 70's, working in the Québec civil service. A lot of men came working in short ( a suit kept in reserve if a sudden meeting with a deputy minister was called though most of them were on vacation). Early 80's, as a business reporter, it was very casual (long trousers but no tie.)
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I assume identical technologies. There is no "uniquely mexican " way to make anything industrial.
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According to Stolpers-Samuelson, unqualified labor should earn relatively less in Mexico and try to move north, which it does. Qualified labor should be payed less in the US and try to move south, which it doesn't.
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A few comments : 1)for most provinces, net transfer are almost witin rounding errors ( so much for the arguments that without the federal Québec would be argh! Greece!) 2) for the physically large provinces, the total figures hide a large disparity between regions. At the top of my head and being on vacations, for example many Montréal suburbs and the Québec City area are probably net contributor while a good part of the eastern Island of Montréal and Bas-St-Laurent and Gaspésie are big recipients. 3) Provincial boundaries are mostly artificial. Lloydminster(AB) has always been a contributor (as part of AB, I don't know enough about its local economy to compute its net contribution) Until recently, Lloydminster (SK) has been a net recipient and has recently moved to net contributor (same caveat about the computation). Move the arbitrarily drawn boundary by a few kilometers and everything change ( Lloydminster AB moves from makers to takers.). Draw AB and SK along an east-west line like the two Dakotas instead of the current one and Calgary is a insignificant agricultural regional town while North Battleford boast of its new daily non-stop flight to Beijing, befitting its well-earned god-ordained status as capital of an oil sheikdom. 4) The constituion arbitrarily assign sources of income to governments. Give mineral royalties to the federal instead of the provinces and the receiving provinces are merely getting their right share of their common property with no one arguing about that 5) Given that education and health are provincially funded on an equal basis in each locality (unless the US), provinces are practicing an equalization program of their own, with nobody complaining.
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Nick:During the "30 glorieuses", losing your !"/ty job meant you got a better one. That job would either go to an immigrant or through trade his cousin abroad. For them it was a less !"/ty than the one he had. Everybody progressed and was happy. I am old enough to have lived through that era. Today, losing your job mean, at best, finding a !"/tiest one. Your job has gone to an immigrant, imported solely to be a scab or to its cousin doing the same role through trade. All with the blessing of the "enlightened" and "responsible" left. And then you wonder at the success of the far right.
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Historically, migration has been used for 1) driving down wages of the lower classes when the cost of international transport was high. Today, container ships do the job. 2) ethnic cleansing of the local populace (the "settlement colonies" of the British Empire, including the U.S. In all cases, it was to the benefit of the host country ruling class. When the migrant bettered its economic conditions, it was a side benefit that guaranteed its loyalty, the way scabs are somtimes better paid than the strikers. Today's bobos, while not really part of the true ruling class, benefit from the same dynamic. They assuage their guilt by pretending to "educate the poor into multiculturalism". As an aside, does the framing change if one side carries an MG-42?
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The point isn't free or expensive. It's the change (here we have real menu costs...)From the prof pov there is a large fixed cost in using a book (familiarity with the book's subject presentation, test bank etc). Do you really want to tell your department head and tell her "My article is late because I am trying a new textbook for those !"/ undergrads and my test bank is not ready yet"?
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Many restaurants post their prices on newly written boards each day. And web sites make it easy for industrial products. And yet, prices are still sticky. Force of habit or is the real stickyness on the buyer's side?
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Roger: average Greeks work 7hr/week more than Germans and retire at almost the same age as Britons. We need to focus on other memes. http://www.forbes.com/sites/niallmccarthy/2015/03/13/contrary-to-what-most-people-think-greeks-work-the-longest-hours-in-europe-infographic/
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Everybody who was somebody had a nuclear program of sort.It was a technical and economic challenge, not a scientific one. Even France already had begun theoretical studies in the '30's.
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Though can have a cheap image, they are superior to bottles as a mean of preservation. In Québec, craft brewers are fast moving toward can. Two new canning lines have recently opened.
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Whitfit: try the Québec beer market! Almost as good as some U.S. states.
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German beer is highly regulated! Will Schaüble close the banks until it is corrected?
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Nick, Tom: this humble IO guy was never that strong on macro. During my graduate days, we once had a problem that I was one of the few to have solved. Prof called me to his office. Explained my method. After reflexion, he said: "Have now idea what grade to give you.The only thing right is the answer...". Dumb luck more prevalent than thought. Other macro anecdotes on demand.
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Tom Brown: "tâtonnement" is a french word. Date from the time french economist were the best in the world and worth listening to. So long ago, I wasn't even born.
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Farage, like LePen, should be minor characters. But it'sthanks to the Brüning of each era that they can from time to time emerge from their caves. Merkel in all her bovine smugness will not be looked kindly in future history books. Let's say kindly that the Maoïsts in Syriza never had as much contact with the real Mao and never caused as much damage than the colonels defending Christian capîtalist freedom did under order from the CIA. As for Britain, each time I feel pity for the "intellectuals", I reread the letters from Thatcher to Hayek deploring the fact that british parliamentary democracy unfortunately prevent the installation of the Pinochet-type regime that the Hayek wished. I have no sympathy for the stupid voters who allowed themselves to be robbed blind by the kleptocracy currently running Britain.
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Of course the main difference between the Czech-Slovak velvet divorce and the German (there is no Europe as of now, only a 4th Reich (ONG Godwin strikes again!)-Greece colonial conflict is that the two divorcees, basically and despite some misgivings, didn't view their former partner as despicable ennemies to be crushed. Politics determine economics far more than the other way around.
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Nick: there is no wasdted knowledge. ANf given the madness around us, quantum physics is a haven of peace and rationality. Even the peace of commenting from the cottage terrace, looking at the sailboats on the St-Lawrence is not enough these days...
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Instead of NPA, why not CBN? https://www.cbnco.com/corp/corp-about.php Note how they pride themselves in the hundreds of professionnals they need? Part of it may signaling but it's a complex business. Small countries usually print in batch now and then and issue as needed. As Lorenzo proudly noted, the medium on which the currency is printed is now a main characteristic on the product.
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Richard H. Serlin: printing is easy. Preparing and engraving of the plate is an extremely long and complex business.
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Nick: The euro was a bad idea badly implemented but the euro will not destroy the EU. German handling of the euro will.
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Nick: I'm sure that Lew and Tsakalotos (or at least their peoples) already had a little talk about airlifting dollars bills and equipement. The U.S. helping Greeks to get out (even though it's what the mad duo wants) would cause friction between Washington and Berlin. But keeping Russia out is primordial. (Even though Tsipras never indicated he was willing to exchange Schaüble for Putin).
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Not wearing a tie? Dress is important in conveying seriousnesss. Hey, after all some of the best dressed guys of the 20th century wore a real nice Hugo Boss black outfit. (OMG, can we speak about Germany without running into Godwin's law?)
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Nick: but what trade is facilitated if you !"/$% up your partner's economy? Anyway, I remember an article in The Economist where they tabulated the cost of starting in London to Parisand exchanged all your money into FF then go to Brussels and changed into BF and then on to every country in Europe. Everything was eaten up by transaction costs. Except that nobody have done that since the Middle Ages when you went from the County of Krapusnick to the Margraviat of Pomfritt through the Earldom of Madnosia,melting all your coins at each border... That was the intellectual level of pro-euro arguments at the time. It just got worse...
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