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Jacques René Giguère
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July 27 1942. French maquisard Valentin Feldman is shot by the Germans. His last wordsto the firing squad: "Imbéciles c'est pour vous que je meurs!" "Imbeciles! It's for you that I die!"
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The big metropolises gaining in international migrants (plus an extremely arrogant intellectual class) while losing their domestic populations outwards is happening all over the western world (except Japan but then remember Kuznets: "There are four kinds of countries in the world: developed countries, undeveloped countries, Japan and Argentina".) In the current political climate, it is not ultimately a good thing.
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The pill didn't much to do. with it. It's merely another,maybe easier, mean of regulating your fertlity that you wished to regulate in the first place. (It's a family blog, so we'll skip the details...) In my own town, the college is situated at the edge of the city on a stupefyingly large site surrounded by a forest. It was supposed to be many times larger and would have been in the downtown area had the population reached the 300 K that was envisionned (we're merely 25K...) It also means problems with stagnating water in the main pipes as the flow is too slow in the too large pipes. It also has some other oddities such as if you go up a few kmona desolate rocky strreet, you suddenly find a large unpaved road six lane wide. It was supposed to link a luxury suburb of 150 K inhabitants to aforementionned downtown. Never paved as the auburbs wasn't built. Probably the world's largest forest trail.
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Whatever the financing, waste is waste. The US 2000's housing boom was privately financed. It ended up so well.
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This is of course routinely done in Europe and Canada. When I did my B.Econ. (not grad. school...) a course on Input-output matrices and modeling was compulsory. At the 2011 annual congress of the Association des économistes québécois (Québec Economists Association) we had Dale Jorgenson as guest speaker. He began his talk thus :"If I was a québécois or canadian economist, I would use an input-output matrix and be done in 20 minutes. But I am an american and it will yake me two hours. Sorry." Audience heartily laugh.
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"A retreat into populism and trade barriers will eventually reveal itself for what it really is – the road to slower growth, poverty and even greater inequality –" So did bolchevism. It took 70 years to find out. And the result was Putinism. OTOH, it was not bad that economics is the dismal science, given the way Carlysle thought...
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I strongly recommend that book "Social traps and the problem of trust" by Bo Rothstein It was inspired by a Russian asking Rothstein, a swedish politicologist:"How can we transform Moscow into Stockholm?" The answer is it took a long time to transform Stockhom into Stockholm. Few people realise how Scandinavia was a bacward,corrupt and badly governed,administered and managed till the early XXth century compared to more southern Europe (the hard-working, well governed Nordics is a recent myth according to Nordics themselves....) The review by Elinor Olson is excellent. https://www.amazon.ca/Social-Traps-Problem-Trust-Rothstein/dp/0521612829/ref=sr_1_18?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1483203930&sr=1-18&keywords=the+problem+of+trust
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There were federal hospitals for veterans in Québec City and Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue in western Montréal (there may have been others). The one in QCity was transfered to the province somwhere in the early '70's to become an hospital for the Université Laval (not to be confused with the Hôpital Laval a few kms away. The one in Montréal was recently transfered and became a CHSLD, specialising in chronic care as this what is has been transformed by the passage of time.
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There was one in Montréal https://archivesdemontreal.ica-atom.org/marine-hospital-18 and one in Québec City,though it seems that responsibility was unclear and may have varied from time to time http://www.banq.qc.ca/ressources_en_ligne/intruments_rech_archivistique/hopitaux/marine.html
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Gifts must be reciprocal as they create a relationship.. When we render a small service, like holding a door, the beneficiary says "Thanks" to which we reply"That's nothing." It indicates that no relationship is created as there is no expectation of a future exchange. Market transaction are not expected to create a relationship,though mutual satisafaction is nice and can induce the participants to favor one supplier-client over another in the long run. A gentleman can invite a lady to a restaurant and theater (the first two part of a date being alimentation and distraction leading hopefully to the third part , affection.) We don't give money. You can't offer money. If you do, you're not a gentleman. If she accept, she's not a lady. The non-money to money, the reciprocal to non-reciprocal spectrum is large and diverse and varies from society to society, including animal ones. (Male chimpanzees are known to kill vervet monkeys in front of female chimps and offering them the meat. It seems the killing is the distraction part of the event and eating is the alimentation. Affection follows.)
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"Nor do they bargain": the rule is you don't do accounting for gifts. Then you if do accounting and if the accounting is not vaguely equal, allowing for temporary fluctuations, you stop the exchanges. "Gifts" may go from the strong to the weak, showing power. They may go from the eak to the strong, showing submission. Gifts may be equal, showing equality. Gifts are transactions that exclude money (except from a grown-up to a young child.) Money is excluded because it is too easy, too obvious and prevent the giver from showing how well it knows what is really pleasing to the recipient. Gifts are a way of testing the level and strength of a relationship. They must be appropriate. A gift may be too small or too large. Both of those cases may hurt the relationship, even break it.
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My nephews & nieces had a bank account while very young. They saw adults using debit and credit cards, buying online and using ApplePay. As one of them told me (he was 5 at the time) "credit cards are for paying things and having debts." I asked him if he wanted a card. He snapped back ":Uncle, that's your hotel key." I admit they're bright, as they are from a high socio-economic background and share part of my genes but still, at worst, they are just a few years ahead of the rest. My students barely carry cash. They use it at the cafeteria (and maybe with their friendly provider in the basement locker hall where no staff goes...).
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Nick: so with my first card. 1973. For my first trip to Blighty (and Scotland too : https://www.hw.ac.uk/schools/textiles-design/. in Galashiels.)
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"We grew up with currency". And we adapt. People no longer try to cover an overdraft by writing a cheque because they understand chequing accounts. My students rarely use currency. They use debit card and Apple Pay and whatnot. I am not sure if they understand that it's only bit on a computer but it's no longer money is "paper with the face of the Queen in the right of canada."
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Despite mouthing pseudo-communist absurdities, he was first and foremost a typical incompetent south american caudillo. As if Batista had learned russian. The hostility from the US had nothing to do with his political views but held from the deep-seated wish of the Southern politicians to control the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribeans, to establish new slave states. The activities of the Golden Crescent Society never really ceased. And basing the idea that Cuba was the richest South American country based on the number of TVs is funny given that they were mostly in hotel rooms, which Cuba, aka America's bordello, had far more than any other SA countries.
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Stare R policies were enacted on their own. Blaming BHO was mere cherry on the sundae. Ivanka has showed no interest in anything else thanpeddling jewelry. Unless she has really hidden talents, she isn't even par for really big corruption on the Putin scale. As for Jared, he needed a cash donation to a degree-selling institution to be admitted. And it won't matter. The R are incharge of districting, voter registration and the next census, as well as naturalisation law. You need only to rig FL,NC,WI,MI and as long as democrats (in the larger sense) go along with the charade, DJT and his gang are in power indefinitely. Business leaders will make the usual choice between long term prosperity free markets and short term cronyism. Trumpistas don't need to jail intellectuals, merely letting them chatter away will be enough. As for the press, no need to murder journalists à la Putin. Their bosses are already normalizing. We are now in the era of gutten deutschen.
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The Appalachians form the southermost part of Québec along the US frontier which essentially is the water divide between the St-Laurent basin and the Atlantic coast. The inhabitants exhibit an attenuated form of Appalachian behavior. The area have been thouroughly studied after the 1980 referendum and before the 2008 provincial election. http://www.pum.umontreal.ca/catalogue/le-comportement-electoral-des-quebecois The BQ isn't remotely Trumpian except in the utterances of the Gazette-G&M-TOStar-McLeans bizarre universe..
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Garment workers didn't became computer programmers. But in a big city with a very good educationnal system their children did. And those who lost their job didn't lose health insurance and at least a minimum retirement income not tied to their employment history(Old Age Pension and if necessary Guaranteed Income Supplement) didn't sent them into economic misery and total despair. The 70's were tough and a few years ago I published here a spreadsheet showing the improvement in employment in QC (province, not city of the same name)since 1966. (Québec,Québec, city so nice they name it twice.) There is something very useful in a big city with a functionning social net.
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The point about big cities is that they offer a better chance of reorienting the workforce. The small resource city where I live has known 2 crashes in my lifetime, with the attending housing boom and bust,personnal bankrupcies and suicide. Last year 2 out of 12 paramedics had to be evacuated for PTSD treatment after seeing too many suicides. In a small city, you know who you are unhooking from the ceiling or disconnecting from the exhaust pipes. Meanwhile Quebec City lost all its garment and shoe industry and became a center for science research and computer games and imaging. The former Dominion Corset factory is now the Faculty of Architecture and design.
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And in Canada this phenomenon is much smaller.So is the sense of despair. https://morecrows.wordpress.com/2016/05/10/unnecessariat/ Read 12th paragraph and maps. I live in a small isolated blue-collar city (though a regional services center with lots of white-pink collars plus a good amount of professionnals) but we don't see that stupefying amount level of drug abuse and suicide.
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Something that differentiate Canada from the US is the much smaller share of population in small cities. From a regional economics (second subject of interest for humble IO guy) standpoint, what is striking is the very weak second and third tier urban network. Maybe because we urbanised somewhat more lately than the US, we had an urbanisation pattern more similar to a third-world sudden urban explosion in major cities, bypassing smaller towns completely, like Thailand where Bangkok has almost 6M inhabitants and the second-largest city, Nonthaburi, less than 300K. (Since my early childhood and I'm not that old, my native QCity metro area has almost tripled in size). It is difficult to feel put upon by east coast elites when most everybody is part of it, whatever we might feel about the CBC TO crew or la gang du Plateau (Montréal media elites)... To gain traction,the rural part of the CPP is forced to ally itself with a much bigger and ultimately controlling urban business wing. In QC, the very weak vaguely Trumpian CAQ is barely able to go outside its potting soil in the QCity northwestern suburbs and south western rural hinterland (nothing in the prosperous and long settled south eastern part, sociologists and historians to the rescue please).Interestingly, a good many of these voters are not only below average in education but are rather recent immigrants from our own Appalachia. Bush II support came from places smaller than 125K. Trump from an even higher support from places smaller than 50K. In Texas, all major cities, San Antonio,Austin,Fort Worth,Dallas and even H freaking ouston were majority HRC. And don't forget that we don't have the heritage of slavery and the 1830's Jacksonian democratic revolution when franchise was extended from rich whites to all white males. As for minorities, whatever the canadian political discussions may be (no trolling please),franco-canadians are a very weak substitutes for African Americans in silent thinking.
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Avon: I could understand a self-styled libertarian approving Trump for not paying its taxes. But the basis of his fortune is inherited wealth, a good chunk of the rest comes from not paying the invoices to its suppliers and his business acumen is having performed no better than half an index fund.
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"The roles that the FBI and Putin’s Russia appeared to have played in this election will also need to be addressed." I am sure this will be investigated by our fine and loyal security services. oIt will be the first direct order of President Trump to Director Comey,
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In the business world, you often buy another concern by assuming the debts. Instead of giving one color of money, you accept the other kind. There doesn't to be a lot of soul searching in that universe. Am I right or is humble IO playing in big people bowling alley?
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If I understand you right, you indeed want to put gas on the fire and I'm ok with that.
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