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Jacques René Giguère
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And even though the MG 42 had a cyclic rate of 1600 rounds per minute, you shoot in burst so as to not overheat the machine. But it was still better than Allied equipment, with the usual german defects of overenginneering and high production costs, limiting the numbers available.
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Bob: I like courtly poets... I don't hate the rich. Few people who have driven a Jagaur XK-R denigrate the experience ( the ignition troubles are not a bug, they are a feature). I teach my students the Blinder priciple "In social policies, have a soft heart but a hard head".I don't mind a regressive efficient tax if it leads to a bigger pie to share.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Tax Competition at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative
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Steve: if you put money in a easy to withdraw form, the bank is less likely to lend it. No different than a mattress.
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Bob Smith:"corporate execs are employees, " In Ruritania, both peasants and court poets are employees of the Most Exalted Duke. But the court poets don't contribute to food production... The high income tax rates are not there to raise revenu but to confiscate rents.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Tax Competition at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative
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And colonizers wish to select immigrants so that they help change the laws of (some of) those who are already here. Nobody immigrate to the U.S. to move to the Bronx, paint himself black and talk ebonic or move to an Indian reservation and talk Hopi. When you immigrate, you are expected to act as a scab on some group already there. (In Canada,you are not supposed to go to Davis Inlet or Attawapiskat or even Quebec City.)
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Vladimir: foreign languages signs ae not forbidden in Québec. They just must be accompanied by a french sign twice the size. (unless they are for cultural, religious or politacal purposes, in which case, there is no language requirements)
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Intersting to talk about income-splitting when nobody remember that a couple can have only one pricipel residence while two unmarried people can have two...
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Clausewitz: "The faulty disposition of one's forces is a mistake that can seldom be recovered from"
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Primed, Kevin: historically, economics in France was first taught in law school as it dealt with property rights. Or engineering school as it was about costs. (the famous "corsards" of the École des Mines). Never as an independant science until rather recently.
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Not just pork fat but cretons http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cretons (it's not tv, it's HBO...)
Toggle Commented Aug 29, 2014 on Tim Hortons at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative
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And there is the cultural North-South divide of I-70. Go south from Dayton airport through the I-75 interchange or OH-4 and watch the appearing of Bob Evans http://www.bobevans.com/ serving grits and chicken fried steaks...
Toggle Commented Aug 28, 2014 on Tim Hortons at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative
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"Start where Canadians gather, and expand outwards! " Which is what McDonald's did with poutine. Start with Québécois then with Canadians. Poutine is now slowly oozing its way around the world.
Toggle Commented Aug 28, 2014 on Tim Hortons at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative
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This where "CB independance" leads us: instead of having clear messages about a common goal, a guessing game. CB independance, in the sense of oacting as a separate unit from fiscal authorities is not needed in the competent countries west of the 1054 schism borders. And impossible anyway elsewhere ( why would the CB be more competent that the fisacal authority? Which is why I always taught my students that, monetarily, what Canada and Québec needed wasn't two countries with the same currency but one country with two (or more ) currencies, coordinated by the same CB. "Oh what fun it is to ride in a wild horses open sleigh..."
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This is not a technological consequence; rather, it’s a political choice.” — Seth Finkelstein, software programmer and consultant Most reassuring. No:most frightening.
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JC: or more properly markets protected from the Euro-Asiatic landmass by very wide oceans.
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And in "Capitalism and freedom", after explaining why the gold standard was bad, Friedman added (from memory) "Restoring the gold standard would benefit the Soviet Union and South Africa,the two countries whose political regimes are the most abhorrent to the United States" Hayek would have concurred on the Soviets but on South Africa? South Africa that his friend and admirer Thatcher refused to sanction? Morally, Friedman was in a galaxy far far away from Hayek.
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Nick: and what if it was to speed with which you change the rate and not the rate itself that is now the operative variable? Years ago, I had a computer with both a joystick (you change the position of the mouse to change the position of the cursor) and a now-discontinued Felix (the changing position changed the speed of the moving cursor). Just the thoughts of a humble IO guy here to learn...
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Credibility? In your Mazda, what is more credible and reassuring to your passengers? A commitment to stay the course come what may or a promise to veer if a truck come in your lane? As a prophet once said:"When facts change, I change my mind.And you sir?"
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Lorenzo: once again,thanks. As I sometimes acknowledge, I am an humble IO guy. I come on monetary thread to get a lot of knowledge and, I hope, a bit of wisdom. I gained a lot in the last few hours. As Walpole said "Life is a tragedy for those who feel and a comedy for those who think"... The French seems to have been AWOL on economic thinking since the days of Say, Bastiat and Cournot. Even in the '60, De Gaulle was making long speeches about gold, a great military tactician and stategist, a brilliant politician caught in a "ne supra crepidam" hell. As for the Germans, you just gave us some insights. This being said. Mundell was in favor of the euro. Seemingly because he was also a hard-money type and a social conservative who enjoyed the idea that a neo-gold standard would let the working class suffer the downward adjustments while the anti-inflation clauses of the pact would take care of any improving wage situation. Optimism? Well, polito-bureaucrats had seen French-German enmity disappear, the Cold war blocs vanished and, almost within their living memory,seen France complete its economic unity and what where at the time seemingly impossible feats, the creation of a somewhat workable Italy and a (maybe too much) well-functionning Germany out of thin air. Could we fault them for optimism? What will be history's judgment a century hence, remembering that Germany very nearly broke up in 1918-19?
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Yep, pad (or the non self fonctionning version , already available in Orwell's time, the book) gave us back time from the drudgery of driving the oxcart. But each time I choose to drive along the St-Laurent, I see I am still unsatiated of the river and mountain view. As for the rest, we invented the hobby, aconcept so weird few of our ancestors would have understood let alone conceive. And we have invented tourism. And medieval fairs. And reenactors...
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Lorenzo: as I say to my admiring students, If I seem to know everything, it's because I learn everything. So mucho thanks for the link. Which begs the question: what made them lose their proficiency?
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Already, for routine tasks,automated aircraft piloting is safer than human. Except when unprogrammed emergencies occur, when you need fast imagination. At least for now, no computer can outwit the Robert Piché http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Pich%C3%A9 and the Chessley Sullenberger http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sullenberger " But why do those same Marxists seem to want force us all to take the bus, or train, driven by the friendly and safe government driver?" When perfect communism has been achieved and all the means of production are in the hands of the proles, we'll all share in driving our communal buses. And the rest of the time we'll play bus-driving games, enjoying the meta.
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DVP Victim: driving 700 km on the QC-138 along the St-Laurent North Shore at night in winter is a high-skill avocation (which, when I am not in the mood, I eschew for a quiet 90 minutes boring airplane ride).
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Nick: my old eyes again . One day everyone will be as old as I am and this blog will be a paradise of cross-talk...
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