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The Butler
Discreet but eager, well-placed if not well-heeled, awash with syntax but void of irony, he attends to Matters Esthetica that abound in the House of Culture
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φ(゚ェ゚♡) …..φ(-ω-。`) …..φ(〃∇〃 )“φʕ•ᴥ•oʔ σ(ൈ)φ φ( ̄¬ ̄ヾ, "The Silent PLAY Exper... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at What the Butler Saw
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Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood. T.S. Eliot INTRODUCTION. Having achieved a solid reputation as a purveyor of art presentation, Fine Art Solutions also awards artist residencies and then mounts exhibitions of the work produced. Such is the context of John Valadez’s Valadez in Vernon, an exhibition at East 26 Projects, a site located on the FAS compound. You can talk about the gritty industrial aesthetic of a museum like the Pompidou. As... Continue reading
Posted Apr 16, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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POPPOSITIONS 2018 focuses on diagnosis, articulation, prescription, and, lest we forget, discovery. It feels more like a World’s Fair than an art fair. Niekolaas Johannes Lekkerkerk provides artistic direction. The show encourages a discussion between people with strongly held convictions about the state of the world and the role of art. It’s idealistic (what should be), pragmatic (what is), cautionary (man has made a mess of things…), and visionary (… but that doesn’t mean there... Continue reading
Posted Apr 15, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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"Play is the highest form of research," attributed to Albert Einstein INTRODUCTION. Under normal circumstances, I would never paint a design on a stranger’s face, much less let her paint one on mine. I would never play charades. Do pantomime. Dance with abandon, sober, during the day. Singly; with someone else; or together with an entire room of strangers. I would never fill in sentence blanks on walls. Paint something based on a wall prompt.... Continue reading
Posted Apr 9, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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Amanda Fruta is the Public Affairs and Communications Specialist at Cal State Long Beach's University Art Museum. She has a B.A. in Art History and Visual Arts from Occidental College. She knows a lot about art in general and about this exhibition in particular. She shares this knowledge without recourse to academic artspeak. She wants to create meaningful connections and partnerships, foster new discourse, and support a culture of access, equity, and public service. Her... Continue reading
Posted Apr 7, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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INTRODUCTION. You can situate the book as a cross between Homer’s Odyssey and Thomas Pynchon. You can also think of it is as Charles Bukowski retelling the story of Theseus' escape from the Labyrinth. (“…her final record spinning closer to the center, like an invisible thread that gently draws him down to her, down to Karmann” (Italics, this writer). An extraordinary backstory, Theseus and the Minotaur. Read it here in Bullfinch’s Mythology. For our purposes,... Continue reading
Posted Apr 3, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
Proving that bigger is better but in ways you wouldn’t expect, Monica Wyatt makes monumental bronze sculptures seem intimate. She exploits the medium’s heroic tradition. Monumental, heroic, and ceremonial. She avails herself of the material’s association with historic and metaphysical themes. Think, for instance, of Auguste Rodin’s iconic “Burghers of Calais” and “The Thinker.” Bronze is permanent, if not timeless. It’s got physical and emotional heft. It creates space and then displaces it. Like a... Continue reading
Posted Mar 31, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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INTRODUCTION. Directed by Ahmed Khan, “Baaghi 2” is a hot mess. This cinematic equal of a strobe light is just too much, too often for an otherwise so-so script. When Neha (Disha Patani) meets Ranveer Pratap Singh (Tiger Shroff), she notes his arrogant brashness. He’s loud, energetic, and passionate. This plays well when he’s in love (it makes him adorable). It also works when he helps her with a favor that becomes biblical in scale... Continue reading
Posted Mar 31, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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A shipwreck on the ocean’s floor. An octopus’ garden. A surreal grotto. Such are the first impressions of Adrian Villar Rojas: The Theater of Disappearance at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA (October 22, 2017 – May 13, 2018). Careful how you navigate the site-specific installation, a total makeover of the Geffen's exhibition space. A spacious room, unrecognizable from its original white box configuration. Except for a few lit display cases (see below), the lights are... Continue reading
Posted Mar 28, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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Tato Akhalkasishvili was born in 1979, Tbilisi, Georgia. He graduated from Tbilisi Academy of Arts in 2003. Afterwards he moved to Germany where he lived and worked in Cologne. In 2008 the artist decided to go back to his country. Nowadays he is based in Tbilisi, Georgia. He works in painting, in addition to making objects, installations and collages. Akhalkasishvili expresses important issues and concepts with the help of different metaphors. Childhood is one of... Continue reading
Posted Mar 27, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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(Jerusalem) is an oxymoron, chockfull of contradictions and schizophrenic realities, which we embrace in this seemingly blessed, but so easily deadly, potent formula of persistent animosity and violence. Jack Persekian, After Matson For the Middle East in general and Palestine in particular, 2018 is a landmark year. A hundred years ago, the Balfour Declaration and Jerusalem’s occupation by British forces. Fifty years ago, the Israeli occupation of East Jerusalem. Enter Jack Persekian, to remind us,... Continue reading
Posted Mar 26, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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José Lerma was born in 1971 in Seville, Spain and grew up in Puerto Rico. He was recently named Chair of the Painting Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His solo exhibitions include Kemper Museum of Art, Andrea Rosen Gallery, Galería Roberto Paradise, Galerie Xavier Hufkens, Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, Green Gallery, Gallery Loock, Galería Marta Cervera, Contemporary Art Museum in Raleigh, NC, Arario Gallery in Seoul, Galleria Il... Continue reading
Posted Mar 25, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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Iabadiou Piko (Piko Sugianto) was born in 1984 in Prabumulih, South Sumatera, Indonesia. In 2005, he graduated from the Academic Design of Vision Yogyakarta Department (ADV) with a major in Diploma of Art Photography Design. He is a self-taught painter who now lives and works in Yogyakarta. He participated in Art Dubai 2018’s inaugural Residents program. New to Art Dubai programming, Residents 2018 invited 11 international artists to spend 4 to 8 weeks in a... Continue reading
Posted Mar 25, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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INTRODUCTION. I’ve always wondered why the story’s called Antigone and not Creon. Or at least why Creon’s not given equal billing in the title. Antigone must choose between death and the mourning and burial of a dead brother. She's the visceral one. Creon is the administrative one. He has to rule a kingdom, nepotism be damned. He’s not evil. He’s just put in the position of pushing the boundaries of decency that his law and... Continue reading
Posted Mar 24, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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Art Dubai 2018 opens this week. It will showcase the work of 500 artists. It will also offer talks, performances, tours, and workshops. Programming includes: Contemporary and Modern. This will feature work from 105 galleries based in 48 countries. The inaugural Residents program. This will feature 11 global artists whose work reflects their experience in the UAE. The Global Art Forum. Titled “I Am Not A Robot”, it will discuss the impact that automation has... Continue reading
Posted Mar 19, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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INTRODUCTION. When you hear intervention, you think something’s wrong and needs to be fixed. For Robert Irwin, that something was art; it needed to be hacked. Beginning as an abstract artist, Irwin questioned painting and found it wanting. In one of those eureka moments by which something seems to come from nothing, but which makes sense in retrospect, he turned to the environment as both his medium and his Muse. Thus was his site-specific work... Continue reading
Posted Feb 20, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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INTRODUCTION. There’s a rhythm to the show, a vibe. It stays with you long after you leave the Museum. Makes sense, doesn’t it? The Caribbean – you think of West Side Story and reggae, merengue and bachata, mambo and calypso. Makes you want to dance through the galleries or at least lilt as you read aloud the wall panels and labels. This rhythm carries you through the tropical installation, through the thematic groupings - Conceptual... Continue reading
Posted Jan 29, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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A butterfly is an apt metaphor for Eden’s Edge: Fifteen LA Artists, curated by Gary Garrels for the Hammer Museum: fluttery and vulnerable, the work is skittish and fragile; lovely to behold, with a trajectory that could only be described by string theory, it rewards close-up looks and far-away ganders; clustered on walls like butterflies massed on a tree, it’s ephemeral, process-oriented, and poised for flight. Too bad it doesn’t sting like a bee. Garrels... Continue reading
Posted Jan 23, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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Until he met her, his destiny was his own. Petty and inconsequential but still his own. He was cocksure and free, young and unaccountable, with dark hair and aquiline features. His expression was always pensive, a little troubled, but not of a maniacal sort. He was more bored than anything else. With a heart capable of violence Until she met him, she was pretty but unappreciated. Her soul had registered no seismic activity. Dust Bowl... Continue reading
Posted Jan 23, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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Illustrations, sculptures, really, to a phantasmagorical story that happen to feature little old you. A virtual – “can this be possible?” - reality-goggled trove? No, it’s “Caught from Below,” Sarah Perry’s new work at Hunsaker/Schlesinger Fine Art. Seventeen pieces cobbled together from Spanish moss and English House Sparrow feathers, snake vertebrae and ribs, pigeon feet and millipedes, not to mention steel, brass, hair, acrylic, glass, and sealants. The pieces don’t so much startle you as,... Continue reading
Posted Jan 23, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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Becca Mann’s new work conflates the workings of memory with the cherries that may or may not line up in a slot machine’s window. You sense a configuration of images – randomly culled from memory - which she paints and then edits from photographs. Standing in the center of the gallery unbidden subjects suddenly spring in or out of focus, divested of spatial or temporal references, at one moment our most important consideration, prominent and... Continue reading
Posted Jan 23, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
An exhibition of paintings and drawings by Guy de Cointet at Overduin and Kite throbs with understated anxiety. This show features two galleries of paintings and drawings executed between 1971 and 1983, the year of his death. It resemble the words of a script, the compositional elements of a stage set, the dynamics of a performance, the playbill and show poster, exploded and splayed on our senses all at once. It’s the word, the process... Continue reading
Posted Jan 23, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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...where, like a blind man, I retraced the jasmine of our exhausted human spring. Pablo Neruda, Macchu Picchu And so it is that art survives its own disappearance: somewhere the real scene has been lost, but everything continues just the same. Suzi Gablik, The Reenchantment of Art For existence has its own order and that no man’s mind can compass, that mind itself but a fact among others. Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian Solemn and majestic,... Continue reading
Posted Jan 23, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
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What’s wrong with a little Disney fantasy if it lets a 6-year-old girl for a moment escape her ironically named slum motel, The Magic Castle? That’s the question answered in the last minute of Sean Baker’s magical The Florida Project, a film included in Art Dubai’s year-round film programming in partnership with Front Row Filmed Entertainment and screened at Roxy Cinemas at Dubai's City Walk. It’s the story of Moonee (Brooklynn Kimberly Prince), 6 years... Continue reading
Posted Jan 23, 2018 at What the Butler Saw
Recipient of a 2014-15 Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, Danielle Eubank paints bodies of water. She also paints water as if it were a body. The way light plays on its surface, the way it reveals its depths to show actual and emotional ripples, waves, and tides. All at once you see reflections of what’s above as well as things on and below the surface. She punctuates her surfaces with prismatic facets of color. Sometimes the surfaces... Continue reading
Posted Jan 23, 2018 at What the Butler Saw