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Jason
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FYI everyone: I just ran Facebook places on my iPhone. Before I could check in, I have to OPT-IN to the service. It wasn't a 196 page EULA, it was just a few sentences explaining the privacy ramifications of what I was about to get myself into. One of them pointed out that if you decide to use the service, friends can check you in and you must disable this if you don't like it. Sure enough, while I was able to say I was at X venue with two of my friends, it would not show up on their feed since they have not approved the Facebook places app. They have not opted in or out at that point, so it was defaulted to out. I know we all love to believe the hype that X company is evil, but it just doesn't fit to reality this time.
Toggle Commented Aug 19, 2010 on random thoughts from vancouver at WWdN: In Exile
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Elizabeth, Facebook can't steal what you willing give them. Oddly enough, you signed in with Facebook to this site, so they must not be THAT bad.
Toggle Commented Aug 19, 2010 on random thoughts from vancouver at WWdN: In Exile
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To be more clear, I'm not even talking about MIM and sniffing. The Internet IS a public space, and you have to guard against it as such. I trust my bank, so I trust them to protect my information against the Internet. You don't trust Facebook, nor do I. However, let's say you trust Twitter. Even if they are of the highest moral fiber, it is possible for them to screw up. See the bug a few weeks ago and all the tuna-heads that you started "following". What if they screwed up again and every DM you sent were made public? Just like LeVar Burton learned about putting his private phone in what he thought was a DM, everyone needs to expect that non-encrypted information is at risk from everything from advanced attacks, selling to "The Man", Ruby on Rails screwups, and simple user error.
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I do see your point, but I think your misunderstanding mine. The point I was replying to Rick on is that some information, that has always been public (ownership records, etc) has become easier to access. That was the original intent. The point I was making in my reply to your blog entry above was that I never expected a non-SSL website to be secure. If you're putting clear text on the Internet, you must assume it is compromised. I don't care if it is your personal email or http://facebook.com, if it is clear, someone can read it. Internet users need to know that. Yes, I'd love a service like Disapora. I'd also like for all of those people I sent a HOWTO on creating their own PGP keys back in 1996 to get back to me. I'm on your side on the fact that people don't take efforts to make their private information private. However, I fail to understand why a Facebook status update is move evil than a Twitter status update.
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Great link, Rick. I love this part: Facebook and Google are INTERNET services. Internet equals public space. Or at least, people should consider it to be so. It's more accurate to say that information technologies are eroding the length of time that is required to access your data.
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To start this comment on the right foot, I signed in with Facebook to TypePad. I find your opposition to Facebook confusing for a man that has a Twitter account and a blog. Both have a worse privacy policy than Facebook. Every man, woman, child and dog on the Internet can read every single thing you post to both of them. Facebook is a blog that is easily linked to other blogs (your friends). If you don't want the world to know about it, don't put it on Facebook. If you only put into Facebook the same things your put into your blog, your privacy is not ruined any more than it was before. For people that don't have 2 million followers, Facebook is a much easier blog to manage. I can put something on Facebook and expect my friends to see it. I had a blog, and only spammers read it. To me, the issue isn't Facebook, it is the millions of people that think posting things in clear text to a website that they don't control is secure. We have a Eternal September issue here, not a evil company issue. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eternal_September
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Jun 2, 2010