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jdege
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To add to the discussion over wireless, why wireless? Because it makes it easy to clear my desk. Not everything I do at my desk involves the computer. When I put my monitors on arms, and moved to a wireless keyboard and mouse, I had a clear desk on which to work, for the first time since I first put a computer on it back in 1984. And I'll not give that up, no matter how quality the keyboard.
Toggle Commented Sep 1, 2013 on The CODE Keyboard at Coding Horror
Used to be, back in the day of 80 column monitors, that I'd print out sections of a program on green-bar paper, and crawl around on the floor with colored markers. Sometimes, you simply need to see more of what is going on, at once, than you can squeeze through an 80x25 character display. I've not done that in a couple of decades. Monitors are larger, resolution is higher, the ability of editors to display relevant sections from disparate large files have improved, and using multiple monitors is now a sine qua non. But tablets? They're a huge step backwards when it comes to working with large amounts of data. But then, laptops aren't all that much better. Laptops, at least, can work with docking stations that allow you to easily connect them multiple large monitors, quality keyboards, mice, pens, etc. Tablets won't replace PCs until they can do the same.
Toggle Commented Oct 4, 2012 on The PC is Over at Coding Horror
The early Unix password scheme involved running the hash iteratively - 1000 times IIRC. How effective is this in strengthening hashes, these days? Does running SHA256 on a password, 64k times, make it take 64k times as long to check a possible, using these GPU attacks?
Toggle Commented Apr 6, 2012 on Speed Hashing at Coding Horror
"It isn't hard at all." If it's just dual-booting a Windows and a Linux installation, perhaps. But how many versions of Windows do you have? Of Linux? When you upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 8, will you do it on your live system, or on a copy? If you do it on your live system, how long will it take to restore from backup, after something goes wrong? For that matter, how long has been since you restored to a bare drive from your backups? If you've never done so, how do you know your backups are actually working? "Swapping drives is unnecessary mechanical wear-and-tear." Drives are cheap.
Toggle Commented Oct 18, 2011 on Multiple Video Cards at Coding Horror
"Why would you even need swappable hard drive bays?" Backups. Multiple OSes. Experimentation. It's a lot easier to install Windows and Linux on separate drives, and to swap the drives, than to keep them working together in a dual boot. Right now I'm in the process of trying out Ubuntu 11.10. So I've made a copy of my Ubunto 10.04 disk, booted from it, and am currently running Ubuntu's upgrade process. If something goes wrong, it's easy enough to swap back to the original. Like you said, HDs are cheap, these days. Enough so that having a bunch of them is quite reasonable. And being able to swap them in and out without having to crack the case is a major convenience.
Toggle Commented Oct 18, 2011 on Multiple Video Cards at Coding Horror
For all your obsessive chasing of the latest and greatest, I'm surprised to see you still using internal drive bays. Swappable hard-drives makes loads of things a whole lot easier.
Toggle Commented Oct 18, 2011 on Multiple Video Cards at Coding Horror
=="In the absence of evidence either way, we should not be issuing permits for people to carry deadly weapons around in public." In the absence of clear evidence of a significant social harm, a free society recognizes that its citizens have the right to do as they choose. BTW - handgunlaw.us copied the chart, they didn't generate it. And they don't have the latest version: Wyoming's recent change wasn't reflected. ZORN REPLY -- I think handgunlaw generated the animated .gif, but thanks for the update, which I posted above with the updated chart. http://www.gun-nuttery.com/rtc.php
"I wonder what it will take for the masses to finally understand that corporations are interested in one thing and one thing only, profits." Of course they are. If they were interested in anything else, they'd be far more dangerous. "If they can get them by laying us all off, shipping our jobs to India, and making us pay for anything beyond email traffic, they'll do it." Why should they bother to do that, when they can just dream up some attractive buzzword and use it to push a bill through Congress that will allow them to eliminate their competition in a perfectly legal manner? "They need to be reigned in." Trying to use big government to control big business is a contradiction in terms. They are two sides of the same coin. We can't regulate ourselves to freedom.
Toggle Commented Feb 15, 2011 on The Importance of Net Neutrality at Coding Horror
"Net Neutrality" as a slogan may be a good idea, but I have grave doubts about it as a matter of law. I have grave doubts about the government's ability to enforce it. Or rather, I fear that any legislation that gives some group of government bureaucrats the authority to regulate "net neutrality" will end up with their establishing a corporate oligarchy with rigid control over content, in the "public interest". Just because the FCC is supposed to use the powers we'll have given it to promote openness, doesn't mean it will use them to do so. Or at least, not according to any definition of the word that we'd recognize.
Toggle Commented Feb 15, 2011 on The Importance of Net Neutrality at Coding Horror
Fewer committees means fewer committee meetings. Which means either fewer bills being passed out of committee, or bills being passed out with less discussion. The former would be good, the latter not so much.
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"Jeff, my "unless" refers not to health care rights, but to the way our society exalts the rights of capital over labor." There's no "rights of capital", or "rights of labor". There is only the right of every individual to dispose of their own property as they see fit. To succeed in a free society, one must trade what one has, whether inherited, produced, or earned, for what one wants. Since most of us don't inherit enough to provide for all we would like to have, we are faced with the choice of either finding a way to create something that other people value, or of stealing or extorting from others what they have. Success in a free enterprise system consists of creating what other people value - which is why it is the only moral economic system. And it's exactly why the left is so opposed to it. They have an infantile hatred of the idea that other people's opinions matter as much or more than their own.
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Health care is not a right, because no one has a right to the product of another person's labor.
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I've seen commentators say they won't consider a mechanical keyboard until someone makes an ergonomic version. Personally, I'd go back to mechanical keyboards in a heartbeat, if someone made a wireless version (RF, please, not IR).
Toggle Commented Oct 23, 2010 on The Keyboard Cult at Coding Horror
"Ask them if the neighborhood is better now, and ask them why. Be sure to note any answers that mention the Republican Party." Or that mention Rudy Giuliani.
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On the other, other hand, the damage to the economy of the state as a whole will be greater than the gain to the local economy, as is inevitable in any government boondoggle. We'll all be poorer as a result.
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I don't know if I'd say it was the elimination of the streetcars or the construction of I-94 that hurt University Avenue worse, but it's clearly hurting. My expectation would be that the local economy would be improved, over the long term, by light rail. But many of the businesses that are currently there are operating on the edge, and I expect a good number will not survive the disruption caused by the construction.
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The fact that the economy of University Avenue is almost dead is evidence that it can easily sustain the additional burden of decreased parking?
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"Kahr CW9" I prefer the PM9, as a daily carry weapon.
Toggle Commented Aug 14, 2010 on What's On Your Utility Belt? at Coding Horror
You all carry knives and USB drives? Why? Victorinox makes a Swiss Army Knife with a built-in USB flash drive: http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/tools/ad41/
Toggle Commented Aug 13, 2010 on What's On Your Utility Belt? at Coding Horror
"I love this quote from the 1943 speech by the NAM honcho that Jeff cites" In 1943, we didn't know as much about the failures of collectivism as we do now. ==Business is not ... stopped by high tax rates.== Big business does fine, under high-tax, high-regulatory schemes. Which is why big business can always be bought off by the collectivists. The problem is that big business is static. Which is why the collectivists are so often willing to get into bed with big business, it's the dynamism of individualism they hate.
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"His restaurant would require 37.5 tipped employees working eight-hour shifts every day to hit 300 hours." Which is exactly what he said, when he said "300 employee hours per day". There's no slight of hand here, except for the innumerate. " Lowering labor costs to ownership isn't going to ensure the success of more restaurants, it is only going to result in lower wages for workers and presumably lower prices for eating out, which might sound fine, but the reality is that deflation is a catastrophic event in economic models ..." Speaking of slights of hand ...
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Seems to me that Breitbart jumped into it with both feet, with this one. And judging from the discussions over on Free Republic, the "conservative grassroots" aren't following along. My position in the discussions there has been that the clip we had seen sounds a lot like the beginning of an explanation of how she had recognized racist attitudes in herself, and had worked to transcend them. A number of commentators seem to agree with me. Hannity seemed to have recognized that he'd climbed out on a half-sawed-through limb, the other night.
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Locke and the Founders were concerned with preserving personal freedom - aka economic freedom. The freedom to work for whom you choose, at what you choose. To invest in property, and to reap the benefits of that property. Political freedom was a concern only to the extent that it was considered the least flawed mechanism for ensuring the preservation of personal freedom. The only legitimate purpose of government is to protect the individual rights of the person - Life, Liberty, and Property. And fundamental to a proper conception of right is the recognition that rights are inherently negative - they are prescriptions limiting what others can do to you, they can never mandate that someone else do something for you. No one can ever have a right to the product of another's labor. So, democracy is an means, not an end. And as for the multitudes of tyrants, both petty and grand, who are interested in building governments that are intentionally destructive of individual liberty, that their systems preserve the forms of democracy, counts for nothing at all.
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==It is often the case that market reform tends to sharpen inequality. The resultant structures of political power, buttressed by corporate plutocrats and all-powerful lobbies, may hijack or corrupt the democratic political process, sometimes undermining the expansion of mass democratic rights, including the freedom of association of organized workers, and raise barriers to entry into the political arena for common people. Thus economic freedom may be important by itself, but neither necessary nor sufficient for political freedom. == In other words, market reform tends to make it harder for the leftists to gain control of the unions. The distinction between economic freedom and political freedom is a specious one.
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"Chile's structural adjustment of the second half of the 1980s was unique from an international comparative perspective. The most difficult, controversial, and costly reforms—including the bulk of privatization, trade liberalization, financial deregulation, and labor market streamlining—were undertaken in Chile in the 1975-80 period; the measures taken after 1985 were minor, in comparison." BTW: http://www.edchoice.org/friedmanday/
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