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Jeff Ernst
Boston
Jeff is a B2B sales and marketing effectiveness guru, blogger, author, and speaker
Interests: sales, marketing, social media, sales enablement, SaaS, web applications
Recent Activity
Andy, Thanks for bringing the HBR article into the realm of recruiting, I totally agree that Social Recruiting is about trust, community and relationships. Too many recruiters are simply using social media as another channel to broadcast their job openings, without regard for how that outreach will attract people, give them insight into why they should be interested in career opportunities at the company, get them emotionally connected to their company, and get them to decide to join one of their communities. The candidate experience starts even before they get to your website and into your ATS. Jeff
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Jeff Ernst is now following The Typepad Team
Mar 15, 2010
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There's no single way to incorporate social media into your recruiting efforts, which makes it somewhat arbitrary to determine whether someone should be called a "Social Recruiter". Social Recruiting is about more than spamming social networks with your job openings.... Continue reading
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I thought about traveling to NYC to attend the #SocialRecruiting summit yesterday, because I am passionate about applying social media to recruiting, but living on a start-up entrepreneur's budget, I'm too cheap. So instead I decided to lurk, and watch... Continue reading
Barbara, great example of transparency. Even without using sites like this, employees are out there already tweeting and posting gripes and frustrations about work, so there's complete transparency into a bad work environment.
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I was able to catch several of the sessions from Monday's #SocialRecruiting Summit via the video stream, and couldn't help but be impressed by some of the great examples of ways companies are using social media for recruiting. But another... Continue reading
Stop Kissing Frogs!! Pouring through resumes is like kissing frogs. The chances of finding a prince are slim. In my work with hiring managers who are recruiting now in anticipation of economic growth next year, I'm hearing so much frustration.... Continue reading
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I'm helping a company hire and ramp up a bunch of new sales reps, and asked the VP of Sales if I could talk to his best rep to gain a better understanding of how he or she works. He... Continue reading
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A real conversation with a marketing manager at a well-known tech company: MARKETER: I'm so frustrated with them. My salespeople don't read my emails and don't even look at the tools I create for them. How can I get through... Continue reading
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Do you like to scan tweets using the regular Twitter interface, search.twitter.com, or a tool like TweetDeck? If so, beware of a repetitive motion that can lead to Carpal Tunnel. As you scroll down columns of tweets, you inevitably are... Continue reading
A lot has been written about the benefits of SaaS to customers, but Jeff Kaplan beautifully describes what I think is the KEY advantage in his Datamation article How SaaS Changes the Vendor-Customer Relationship. Jeff says: "SaaS shifts the responsibility... Continue reading
Trish, great points. Talking with customers who bought reveals things that can be replicated, but "loss interviews", I've often found, can be even more insightful in terms of identifying bigger issues that need fixin. And I can vouch for the great service that Trish and The Bridge Group deliver.
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It's such a common state that it's become accepted as a fact of life in sales: 20% of sales people bring in over 60% of the revenue Year after year, surveys have backed this up. CSO Insights, in their 2009... Continue reading
Gerhard, Thanks for sparking a great discussion. Does sales enablement have a future? As long as Jim Dickie's data shows 40% of reps missing quota, and Lee Levitt's research shows buyers think sales reps actually slow down their buying process...yes. You say that "The noble purpose of Sales Enablement companies is to help sales organizations save time finding relevant information, create and organize sales content and create quick access to all experts across the enterprise." Those aren't noble, those are by-products. Not too many VPs of Sales care about content. The real purpose of sales enablement companies (both technology and services providers) is to help the VP of Sales address an issue that keeps him/her awake at night: "How do I scale my sales organization, to generate more revenue with fewer resources?" Sales is like any other business process. The only way to scale it is to drive repeatable behavior. The only way to drive repeatable behavior is to surface best practices - the activities, strategies, and conversations that are proven to work in different selling situations, so that every rep can do more of those things. That's the role of sales enablement. Think about it, what is every middle-of-the pack sales rep dying to know? What did (insert name of one of your stars) do to win that deal? More on that here http://bit.ly/ZQUeb. If you truly believe that best practices are not resusable, then your only choice to scale sales is to hire only gifted A players. We know how well that works. You've got to enable the B and C players to be incrementally better. The sales enablement vendors all try to surface best practices, but they do it in very different ways. Some are focused on delivering a better sales portal, some are using Web 2.0 capabilities to automate the inefficient ways sales people work today, while others allow you to guide sales reps through the customer's buying cycle using proven playbooks. The best approach for you depends on your culture. Don't let the vendors fool you, there's no way to enable sales without hard work. But I for one would rather have a sales enablement person spend one hour to save 1,000 salespeople an hour each. Jeff Ernst TheSalesEnabler.com
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David, these are all great points, and thanks for linking to my ebook on The New Rules of Sales Enablement. Not surprised that your point #13, about making the ebook totally free with no registration, would be noted as going against traditional lead capture practices. Similar to what Jonathan suggests (and he helped me with my ebook), here's something I did that has proven to be extremely effective in capturing leads: One of the sections of my ebook pertains to the concept of Sales Playbooks, so in that section I link to an offer for my Guide to Creating Killer Sales Playbooks. This guide has a short registration form to capture leads. I estimate that one in five people who read the ebook also requests the guide. And these people have self-qualified their higher level of interest in the topic of Sales Playbooks.