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Los Angeles, California
Serving up science and culture with a splash of wit.
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Minds of Modern Mathematics. IBM/Eames Office. For iPad. Free download. Reviewed by Jennifer Ouellette Visitors to the New York Hall of Science in Queens can browse through an impressive installation called "Mathematica: A World of Numbers... and Beyond." Now that exhibit has a digital equivalent in Minds of Modern Mathematics,... Continue reading
Posted Mar 19, 2013 at Download The Universe
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Titanic: Uncovering the Secrets of the World's Greatest Shipwreck, by National Geographic Shorts. National Geographic. Amazon Kindle/iBooks/Barnes& Noble Reviewed by Jennifer Ouellette Last fall, ABC launched a lazy, cynical reboot of the iconic 1970s TV series Charlie's Angels, hoping to cash in on the whole nostalgia trend. NPR's Linda Holmes... Continue reading
Posted Apr 18, 2012 at Download The Universe
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The Solar System, by Marcus Chown. Touch Press, 2010. For iPad. Reviewed by Jennifer Ouellette The BBC's hugely popular modern reboot of Sherlock Holmes recasts the world's greatest detective as a high-functioning sociopath (by his own admission) who augments his legendary detection skills with all the latest technologies. Oh, and... Continue reading
Posted Mar 14, 2012 at Download The Universe
There is already a service for this. it's called Twitter. Or Facebook. Both of which are better designed than this new Follow feature on Typepad. I don't want that sort of thing cluttering up my Dashboard, and I suspect many of my readers who also blog at Typepad won't be thrilled at the prospect either. Not everything has to be one stop shopping. Typepad does basic blogging platforms very well. Stick with your strengths.
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Um, major FAIL, lovely folks at Typepad. I appreciate you want to keep users informed, but this just clutters up an already busy dashboard. UNFOLLOW!
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Jennifer Ouellette is now following The Typepad Team
Mar 15, 2010
@Tom: I don't think it's even remotely anti-intellectual -- anything but. Carter does NOT "solve all the town's problems" by a long shot. He adds a certain practical-minded element -- because it would be equally unfair to just make him the Big Dumb Buffoon, wouldn't it? But he absolutely needs the scientists to help resolve issues as well. The show might not deify scientists enough for your tastes, and that's your prerogative, but to accuse it of anti-intellectualism is simply not a valid critique. As for Real Genius, I was a fan of the film, but it was a tad sophomoric and one-note. The characters in Eureka are far more well-developed and complex.
Toggle Commented Feb 7, 2010 on my kind of town at Cocktail Party Physics
Well, next fall/winter there will be a book published that I hope will help fill that gap. I hear you on that score: "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Calculus" was a bit beyond me when I started, frankly; perhaps they should rename it "The Half-Wit's Guide to Calculus." It helped to be married to a physicist who is good at explaining such things. Jason Bardi's "The Calculus Wars" and Charles Seife's "Zero" provided some useful insights, but mostly I found a series of lectures from The Teaching Company to be useful. The series is called "Calculus Made Clear" and is taught by a Texas math professor named Michael Starbird. There's also another lecture series on the history of math in general that was useful. Hope that helps! I didn't learn calculus in any linear fashion; I picked it up in bits and pieces, with lots of repetition, and grasped a bit more with each iteration. But you do need someone knowledgeable to guide you when you have questions. A tutor, perhaps? On Sep 30, 2009, at 3:58 PM, typepad@sixapart.com wrote: NEW! More options for replying to comments via email: To reply privately to the commenter, click on the commenter's email address below. To reply publicly on your blog, reply to this email. A new comment from “Jonathon Howard” was received on the post “game changer” of the blog “Cocktail Party Physics”. Comment: The question for those of us who hate math (I'll spare you my own personal story, though its much like the ones already posted), the question is how do we go about correcting the deficiency now? I'm a working professional with a wife and responsibilities, so how do I go about learning the algebra and geometry I'll need to understand calculus and other maths subjects? The last time I tried, after I got my BA and was applying to Grad School. I was studying for the GREs and was having trouble with the math sections, my then girlfriend (now wife) picked me up these children's study guides and offered to help. But all I got was frustrated and angry. I felt like understanding math was like driving into a wall! Does anyone have some recommendations? Commenter name: Jonathon Howard Commenter email: nosophoros@gmail.com Commenter URL: http://dimortuisunt.wordpress.com IP address: 192.234.214.110 Authentication: None Enjoy! The TypePad Team P.S.: Learn more about replying to comments. Published Unpublish Delete Mark as Spam Edit Comment Six Apart, creators of Movable Type, Vox and TypePad. 548 4th Street, San Francisco, CA 94107 Manage Notifications | Support | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy
Toggle Commented Sep 30, 2009 on game changer at Cocktail Party Physics
@Michael: The authors specifically mention the Planck telescope as being potentially powerful enough to detect a cosmic scrape, yes. The key word there is "potentially." :) On Sep 29, 2009, at 10:12 AM, typepad@sixapart.com wrote: NEW! More options for replying to comments via email: To reply privately to the commenter, click on the commenter's email address below. To reply publicly on your blog, reply to this email. A new comment from “Michael T.” was received on the post “When the Multiverse Collides” of the blog “Discovery Space: Twisted Physics”. Comment: Hi Jennifer: Do you know if the Planck Satellite is sensitive enough to detect the "cosmic scrape" proposed in the Aguirre/Johnson paper? Commenter name: Michael T. Commenter email: mdtiberi@hotmail.com IP address: 75.10.206.243 Authentication: None Enjoy! The TypePad Team P.S.: Learn more about replying to comments. Published Unpublish Delete Mark as Spam Edit Comment Six Apart, creators of Movable Type, Vox and TypePad. 548 4th Street, San Francisco, CA 94107 Manage Notifications | Support | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy
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Absolutely, I had a very similar "atheist conversion" moment. I was raised by right-wing fundamentalist Christians, and grew up on a steady diet of bible studies, The 700 Club, "Focus on the Family" and Pentacostal prayer meetings. And like Susie, I gave it my all: did volunteer work as "service," community outreach, bible study once a week, praying every night -- I was the very model of a budding Young Christian Woman. (TM) But inside, I felt pretty empty, like there was "no there, there." Fortunately, I was also an avid reader with a curious mind and love for mythology, other cultures, science, literature, etc. I got exposed to other worldviews without even trying too hard, which forced me to question what I'd been taught. And over time, I simply couldn't reconcile my inherited "faith" with anything that was real to me. Years later, I was talking to my mother about my loss of faith. She simply couldn't understand it, since her "conversion" (after her best friend was killed by drunk driver) was this epiphany wherein she felt an enormous burden lifted off her shoulders and felt peace inside for the first time in her adult life. My gentle response: "That thing you felt when you accepted Jesus? That's EXACTLY how I felt when I accepted my own lack of faith: a tremendous sense of relief that I didn't have to pretend anymore, and could relax and be my own agnostic/atheist self. I felt peace." The poeple who urge us to join a church and effect change from within don't understand one simple point: we can't effect any kind of change if we don't believe.
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