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Many of you are probably familiar with the story of Phineas Gage. He was widely regarded as a kind and generous man, but he suffered from a freak accident during his work on a railroad, and the result was that... Continue reading
Posted 8 hours ago at PEA Soup
All of these comments are very well-taken and definitely help to clarify the properties of the Google Scholar Metrics list. Still, I worry that people may be looking to this spreadsheet to do something for which it was never really intended. So it might be helpful for me to say just a little bit more about what I was aiming to accomplish with the list. The goal was to get a better understanding of what philosophers are doing these days in the study of the mind and how work these days differs from work in the 20th century. To do this, I needed a sample of philosophy papers. One approach would be to just look at papers from certain specific journals (say, Phil Review and JPhil). I have a lot of respect for work that has taken this approach, but as Brian Weatherson has pointed out, these journals are a little bit unrepresentative of our discipline in certain systematic respects. So instead I turned to the list of highly cited papers given by Google Scholar Metrics for twenty journal in the past five years. Then I used Web of Science to look up the most highly cited papers in those same journals for the years 1960-1999. The study proceeded by comparing the percentages of papers on various topics within the contemporary sample to the percentages in the 20th century sample. To get a sense for the point of this approach, it might be helpful to compare it to the approach of just looking at a few specific journals. Researchers who take that other approach clearly don't think that the papers they are examining are a complete set of the most philosophically important papers in a particular time period. Rather, their thought is that the papers in these journals offer a good sample of philosophically important work. In just the same way, it is clearly a mistake to suppose that the papers on the Google Scholar Metrics list are a complete set of the most highly cited papers in a specific time period. Rather, they offer a helpful sample of highly cited papers from a particular time. For researchers who want to understand how the discipline is changing over time, this can be a valuable resource. My sense is that the Google Scholar Metrics list provides a sample that is a bit less unrepresentative of our discipline than anything we could get just by taking a sample of papers from specific journals. However, I would of course be very open to considering other approaches that might be even more informative.
Just to clarify, this spreadsheet did not involve any decision-making on my part. It is simply the list of papers included in the "philosophy" subcategory of Google Scholar Metrics: https://scholar.google.com/citations?view_op=top_venues&hl=en&vq=hum_philosophy The reason I originally put it together was that I was conducting a quantitative study about the kind of work people are generally doing these days in philosophy of mind. It does seem that this list can be helpful in addressing questions of that type, but for the reasons Tom Hurka gives, it obviously would not be at all helpful in comparing the influence of individual papers. (As I noted above, I created this thing as part of an attempt to conduct one specific study and never expected it to attract this broader interest.)
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Some of you may be familiar with the controversy surrounding the hormone oxytocin. Some rather sensational work in popular science described it as the 'love hormone' and presented as a wellspring of empathy and interpersonal harmony. More recent work then offered a more complex picture, with oxytocin leading to prosocial... Continue reading
Posted Apr 30, 2015 at Flickers of Freedom
I have actually been very struck by the difference between philosophy and social psychology in this regard. Just as Inzlicht notes, there has been a lot of defensiveness in social psychology, with researchers whose findings fail to replicate striking back angrily at the replicators. By contrast, in the world of philosophy, one finds exactly the opposite. In every single case in which a philosopher's experimental work has failed to replicate, the philosopher has been very gracious about the whole issue and has even praised the replicators for their work. I am not sure what explains the difference, but perhaps it arises because philosophers have a well-established cultural norm according to which disagreement is just an ordinary part of the way research is done. The one thing I find slightly regrettable about the way things have proceeded in philosophy thus far is the difference between the reactions of the original researchers and the reactions of other philosophers interested in the issue. Though the original researchers have always graciously acknowledged the replication failure, there has been a disappointing tendency for other researchers just to continue citing the original experiment as though the replication failure had never taken place. So please, please, please, before you cite any research in experimental philosophy, take a look at Christian Mott's replications page: http://pantheon.yale.edu/~jk762/xphipage/Experimental%20Philosophy-Replications.html You can then see whether there have been any replication attempts and, if so, whether they have been successful.
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The idea of using experiments to address philosophical questions has provoked heated debate in many areas of philosophy. However, if there is one area in which this approach has been completely uncontroversial, it is the field of formal semantics. This field unites researchers in philosophy and linguistics in an interdisciplinary... Continue reading
Posted Apr 3, 2015 at Experimental Philosophy
First off, a huge thank you to Gregg for all of his posts! This past month has been a really exciting one here at Flickers. Before we turn over to next month's author, I wanted to get people's thoughts on an issue that has been cropping up a lot in... Continue reading
Posted Mar 29, 2015 at Flickers of Freedom
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Here. The piece provides a wonderfully entertaining review of recent experimental findings, especially the work of James Beebe and David Sackris, all framed as a rather brutal take-down of an article on moral relativism in the New York Times. Continue reading
Posted Mar 7, 2015 at Experimental Philosophy
If you are interested in experimental philosophy’s ‘negative program,’ I highly recommend Stephen Stich and Kevin Tobia’s new paper Experimental Philosophy and Philosophical Tradition. The paper provides a cutting-edge summary of where this research program is at right now, including a beautiful review of the relevant empirical data. Now, I... Continue reading
Posted Jan 2, 2015 at Experimental Philosophy
Last year, I put up a post about ten people doing experimental philosophy who had gotten jobs in the field. I just realized, however, that I was neglecting another source of new experimental philosophers -- people who had been doing experimental work in some other discipline but who then ended... Continue reading
Posted Dec 24, 2014 at Experimental Philosophy
One of the most exciting developments in experimental philosophy these days has been the surge of work on how people understand the self. Over the past few years, there have been a whole bunch of really interesting studies on personal identity, on the 'true self,' and on the way that... Continue reading
Posted Nov 19, 2014 at Experimental Philosophy
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There has been a lot of talk lately about how to provide undergrads with good information about grad schools, and I thought we here at Experimental Philosophy might be able to do our part by providing some information about where to go to grad school to study experimental philosophy. To... Continue reading
Posted Sep 28, 2014 at Experimental Philosophy
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With a really nice piece about the recent paper by Eddy Nahmias, Jason Shepard and Shane Reuter. A big congratulations to the three of them! Continue reading
Posted Sep 19, 2014 at Experimental Philosophy
John Turri has a new series of studies indicating that maybe people don't actually have it after all. Continue reading
Posted Sep 16, 2014 at Experimental Philosophy
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Most of you are probably familiar with the notorious manipulation argument. The argument starts with a seemingly straightforward thought experiment. Suppose that an agent decides to perform an action and that this agent's decision was guided by mental states in the normal way. But now add one further factor. Suppose... Continue reading
Posted Aug 24, 2014 at Flickers of Freedom
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These past few years have seen a surge of metaphilosophical work exploring the implications (or lack thereof) of the empirical studies being conducted in experimental philosophy. Much of this metaphilosophical work is being done by people who are not experimental philosophers themselves but who simply want to address the larger... Continue reading
Posted Jul 7, 2014 at Experimental Philosophy
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In his immortal Twilight of the Idols, Nietzsche proposes an intriguing hypothesis about why people believe in free will: The doctrine of the will has been invented essentially for the purpose of punishment, that is, because one wanted to impute guilt. The entire old psychology, the psychology of will, was... Continue reading
Posted Jun 1, 2014 at Flickers of Freedom
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One of the great things about working in experimental philosophy is getting a chance to see all of the amazing stuff coming out of very junior researchers. As a faculty member, I sometimes feel that I am already kind of peripheral to the field and that the most cutting edge... Continue reading
Posted May 25, 2014 at Experimental Philosophy
Imagine a person who is not at all motivated to help others. I don't just mean a person who doesn't care about others as much as she should; I mean a person who is literally not motivated at all, not even to the tiniest degree. Now comes the question: Could... Continue reading
Posted Mar 16, 2014 at Experimental Philosophy
Imagine a person who is not at all motivated to help others. I don't just mean a person who doesn't care about others as much as she should; I mean a person who is literally not motivated at all, not... Continue reading
Posted Mar 16, 2014 at PEA Soup
Yale just created a new program in which graduate students can get a single degree that counts as a PhD in both philosophy and psychology. The basic idea is that students take courses in both departments and then write a single interdisciplinary dissertation. On completing the degree, students should be... Continue reading
Posted Nov 25, 2013 at Experimental Philosophy
Imagine a person who is addicted to heroin but who desperately wants to kick the habit. He has a craving for another hit, but when he reflects, he rejects this craving and wishes he could get rid of it. Now ask yourself: Which part of this person constitutes his true... Continue reading
Posted Nov 3, 2013 at Experimental Philosophy
Imagine a person who is addicted to heroin but who desperately wants to kick the habit. He has a craving for another hit, but when he reflects, he rejects this craving and wishes he could get rid of it. Now... Continue reading
Posted Nov 3, 2013 at PEA Soup
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