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Jobev
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I know what you mean about lingering winter, Dory.At least here the garden is stirring in February.
Toggle Commented Sep 22, 2014 on Autumn at Word Wenches
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That brings back memories of fall in Eastern Canada, Samantha. But then came winter!
Toggle Commented Sep 22, 2014 on Autumn at Word Wenches
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That's beautifully expressed, Cathy. Thank you!
Toggle Commented Sep 22, 2014 on Autumn at Word Wenches
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I can see that if summer is too hot,Lil, especially with humidity, fall would be a relief.
Toggle Commented Sep 22, 2014 on Autumn at Word Wenches
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Autumn can be a lovely month, and here in Devon we're having a particularly warm and sunny one, for which I give thanks, but for me there's a sorrow to it, mainly from it also bringing the equinox. From now on we'll have less daylight than dark. I sense winter prowling towards me, smelling of dark and cold. Yup, if you haven't guessed, I could cut winter out of the year and think nothing lost. Well, to be precise, I'd cut from mid November to mid-February. Don't worry,I'd stretch out the other bits and we'd still have Christmas. Continue reading
Posted Sep 22, 2014 at Word Wenches
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Jana, that's when I really got going -- when the younger son went to school.
Toggle Commented Sep 17, 2014 on Ask A Wench: Are We Writers? at Word Wenches
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Jenny, I read about how Mary Ann Clarke did it, but it still didn't make sense that she could get away with it. It wasn't anything to do with the royal family except for her connection to the Duke of York. She just knew who to talk to about things. I believe it was mostly a matter of getting into, or transfered to, the desirable regiments. There was a big difference between them. Yes indeed, Hermione is Roger's sister. Good work!
Toggle Commented Sep 7, 2014 on Buying a "pair of colours." at Word Wenches
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Thanks for loving the Rogues, Angela! Too Dangerous for a Lady will be out in April.
Toggle Commented Sep 7, 2014 on Buying a "pair of colours." at Word Wenches
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Fascinating family story, Kathleen.
Toggle Commented Sep 7, 2014 on Buying a "pair of colours." at Word Wenches
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That's right, Diane. Clarissa in The Devil's Heiress.
Toggle Commented Sep 7, 2014 on Buying a "pair of colours." at Word Wenches
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As Kat says, Marquis and Marquess are the same thing, and pronounced the same way -- marquess. That's why I use marquess in novels because otherwise some people might read it as "markee"
Toggle Commented Sep 5, 2014 on Buying a "pair of colours." at Word Wenches
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Shannon, there are quite a few memoirs of the Napoleonic Wars by men in the ranks and non-commissioned officers. I don't have references off the top of my head, but you should find some if you look. They do mention officers, the good and the bad, but the general impression I have is that the new young ones were willing to be advised. They'd have to be stupid not to be. As they advanced up the ranks, weak officers were often more trouble than strict ones, but some were by nature tyrants and even insane. However, senior officers were alert to this, because it would definitely reduce the effectiveness of a regiment.I remember reading of one case where an officer was shipped home from the Peninsula with a note not to send him back. Even during the war there were places to send bad officers where they could do least damage, and perhaps even die of tropical diseases and such.
Toggle Commented Sep 5, 2014 on Buying a "pair of colours." at Word Wenches
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There is definitely something about a man in uniform, yes!
Toggle Commented Sep 5, 2014 on Buying a "pair of colours." at Word Wenches
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Thanks,Lil!
Toggle Commented Sep 5, 2014 on Buying a "pair of colours." at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Sonya. They did have to "stand fire", but it was in fact safer than breaking and running. Most firearms weren't very accurate, especially at a distance. You could still be killed, but probably not by someone aiming directly at you. A skilled rifleman was the most dangerous. It's also worth noting that in these times officers led from the front.In percentage terms, they were the most likely to die in battle, especially in attacks on garrisons and such.
Toggle Commented Sep 5, 2014 on Buying a "pair of colours." at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Nancy. Could men still raise regiments in the Regency? "I think that when a man was promoted above the purchase ranks, he received the money paid out by the person who moved up to his vacated position." That would make sense, but I did come across something that said it created problems. So I don't know. A man became a half-pay officer when he didn't have a job. In peacetime, regiments were reduced in size or sometimes closed down. The officers who weren't needed could take half pay and remain available. Often they wouldn't be able to sell out because of the reduction, which is why a half-pay officer was often a sorry fellow. Re pensions, regiments had funds paid into by the men according to their rank, which paid out to legal dependents. I gather they generally had plenty of money because not many serving soldiers took wives and had legitimate children.
Toggle Commented Sep 5, 2014 on Buying a "pair of colours." at Word Wenches
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Let's start out simply. Men paid to attain officer ranks in the British army. They started at the bottom, generally as youths, when someone purchased a slot at the lowest rank, which was cornet in the cavalry and ensign in the infantry. This was popularly called "buying a set of colours." Thereafter, they purchased the next highest rank from someone who held it when that man was either retiring -- "selling out" -- or moving up the ranks by buying the next highest. Hence, the Purchase System. They money paid in over the years can be seen as an investment, or even a pension plan, because when a man sold out he kept what he was paid for his rank at the time. It's easy to see it as a corrupt system, but in many ways it worked and of course there were all kinds of variations and nuances. For a start, the Royal Artillery and the Royal Engineers never had the tradition of purchase. Nor did the navy. Continue reading
Posted Sep 5, 2014 at Word Wenches
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Interesting, Shannon. This is what I love -- opening a book and finding wonderful stories.
Toggle Commented Aug 19, 2014 on Duels and Divorce in High Places at Word Wenches
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Heavens. Very intertwined! Thanks for that, Lucy.
Toggle Commented Aug 19, 2014 on Duels and Divorce in High Places at Word Wenches
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That could be true, Thea. I don't know. They could have entered the marriages willingly and found them unsatisfactory.
Toggle Commented Aug 19, 2014 on Duels and Divorce in High Places at Word Wenches
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Oh, you're right about it being Charlotte who was Cadogan. I'll leave it or your comment won't make sense. It is hard to keep straight! Fascinating stuff about Captain Cadogan. Such a great collection of characters. Yes, by the time of Waterloo the dust had settled and Wellington was pragmatic enough to use Uxbridge, as he was by then, to the full. Uxbridge famously lost his leg in the battle.
Toggle Commented Aug 18, 2014 on Duels and Divorce in High Places at Word Wenches
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That's true, Lil. Real events have been the spark for some of my stories.
Toggle Commented Aug 18, 2014 on Duels and Divorce in High Places at Word Wenches
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Theo, that is so cool. By far the best "thing on a desk." I remember a story about Dorothy Dunnett, who apparently had a toy parrot in her hallway that repeated back what was last said. She was going to open the door and tripped on something, so the visitor entered to the parrot repeating a stream of rather heated words!
Toggle Commented Aug 18, 2014 on AAW: On our desks . . . at Word Wenches
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Having been decided to go for a fire, a question arose, whether Lord Paget had taken aim, as if intending to hit his antagonist. Both the seconds being clearly of opinion that such was not his intention (although the degree of obliquity he gave the direction of the pistol was such, as to have been discovered only by particular observation), Captain M'Kenzie stated to Captain Cadogan, that as it appeared to be Lord Paget's intention not to fire at him, he could not admit of the affair proceeding any further. Continue reading
Posted Aug 18, 2014 at Word Wenches
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Glad to have a cheer for "historical", Sheila.
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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