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Jobev
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Shannon, you're right about the created family. I suppose that's the best of both worlds. A family, but of chosen people.
Toggle Commented 7 hours ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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No escape. I like it! I hope you enjoy the Rogues. Many male readers do because none of the Rogues is an idealized Romantic Hero. They have insecurities.
Toggle Commented 7 hours ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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Lovely that you've reconnected, Gloria. Often differences over politics, religion, or other matters can be ignored.
Toggle Commented 7 hours ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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Interesting question about rank, Julie. People of lower rank were less likely to move far in their lives and when they married, so friendships could survive. So could rivalries and enmity, of course! But there are examples of aristocratic friendships,which we mainly know of from letters. If they were meeting in person it would leave less evidence. Queen Anne had a famous friendship with Sarah Churchill, but it required Sarah to spend a lot of time with the queen.
Toggle Commented 7 hours ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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Janice, I agree about the pecking order. I think everyone is aware of that, but sometimes it's more obvious and important than at others.
Toggle Commented 7 hours ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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That must be a lovely unit, Sonya! You're very fortunate.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Friends at Word Wenches
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I can't really agree about the competition, Artemisia. I think that would only come into play if there was a shortage of men. Thinking back to my university days I had good friends but there were plenty of men around and we weren't interested in the same ones. It might have been much the same in a London season. There would be the particularly eligible men, but most young women would have different tastes. But yes, those older friendships could be particularly special.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Friends at Word Wenches
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Marion, it's lovely to make a good friend later in life. How great that you've kept in touch in that way.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Friends at Word Wenches
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I hadn't thought about Heyer like that. Anne. Unequal and perhaps slightly dysfunctional friendships. I don't think we see many of those in modern books. Is that a sign of changing times?
Toggle Commented yesterday on Friends at Word Wenches
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"Someone mentioned that showing male friendships tells the reader that the heroes can be loyal and caring and friendly and while books can't show us everything of our heroines' lives, I think giving the heroine her own close friends show us the same things about her." I agree, Michelle. Perhaps if the heroine doesn't have friends on the page, we can see how she relates to them. Which would bring us back to letters, perhaps.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Friends at Word Wenches
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Interesting comments, Prema. I agree that family can be the best and the worst.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Friends at Word Wenches
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Lillian, that's interesting about a woman's need of family. It's true. In the past friends would be lovely, but they couldn't protect the way a family could. They had no legal force, to begin with. Of course some women would need protection from their friends.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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"By the time our heroine has reached an "advanced age", all her earlier friends have moved on to a different stage in life and so she has become isolated because of that spinster/old maid status." That's a good point, arising out of a preference for older heroines. I have done younger ones and it's easier for them to still have girlhood friends. Excellent reminder of the older ladies who are still connected to their friends, and who can be pulling strings behind the scenes.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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Great that you used letters so effectively. Perhaps we need more letters in historical romances.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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Epistolary novels can be fascinating. Have you read Sorcery and Cecilia? It's a fantasy Regency in letters, with one lady in London and the other in the country.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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I agree, Janga. They are more common in contemporaries.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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Glad you find it interesting, Mary Jo. I hadn't thought much about it before. People always used to say to watch how a man treats his mother. But not many romance heroes get the chance, I don't think! Thinking of my books. Current hero, mother dead. Previous hero, mother mad. Before that, mother cold and distant. Before that, same mother. Before that, ah-ha! Christian Hill with a wonderful mother and family. But it's a sorry list. Must do better.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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Good point about the opportunity to make friends outside of the family, Misti, especially for women. Unless someone lived very close, it would be tricky.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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"I think we often see heroines isolated by some circumstance which makes it difficult to maintain friendships and this makes the relationship with the hero that much more significant because he becomes Best Friend as well as lover and I like that." That's an interesting point, Fiona. I think the isolated heroine was a classic feature of contemporary romance.She was often a waif of some sort, such as an orphan. I thought it had changed a bit, but perhaps not. What they call "new adult" books -- characters in their early twenties -- seem to put a lot of emphasis on friendships, existing or new, aside from the romance.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Friends at Word Wenches
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I read an article the other day in which an author said that no one wrote books about friends anymore. (Sorry, lost the link.) It struck me as strange, as books about women friends seem common to me. There are probably as many with men friends, but perhaps they're more like comrades-in-arms? That led me to ask on my facebook page about favorite friends in historical romance. I didn't want it to look like a promo troll, so I banned mention of my Company of Rogues unless people wanted to point to particular friendships within the group. There were some interesting replies, but I'll pose the question again here. What are your favorite one-sex friendships in historical romance? Two women or two men, and not sisters or brothers. Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at Word Wenches
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I agree. Chess pieces can be so gorgeous. If I were a collecting sort of person I might collect chess sets.Interesting blog, and great scene!
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Check-Mate! at Word Wenches
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Pat, I don't have a lot of problem with primogeniture in context. Agricultural societies that divided the land equally (usually between sons, but sometimes between all children) ended up with people sitting on scraps of land that couldn't support them. I read about one interesting society that took the opposite approach. The youngest son inherited. The idea was that by the time the father died the older ones should have made a life for themselves, knowing they'd not inherit, but the younger one wouldn't have to hang around forever waiting. Wish I could remember where it was. A side benefit of British primogeniture was the younger sons who were sent out to fight for their country or make their fortunes and explore, administer, and develop trade links. It's generally credited with creating the Empire. However, as you say, having estates fall into the hands of the useless or idiotic was bad. And the whole situation throws up lots of lovely plots.
Toggle Commented Mar 20, 2015 on Primogeniture at Word Wenches
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You overwinter tomatoes? In a greenhouse?
Toggle Commented Mar 15, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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Kanch, that was a fun one. Because I know when my books take place, there was d'Eon, completely unignorable, so I had to involve him. It turned into a lovely plot thread and I like to think that Rothgar's machinations explain much of the mystery about d'Eon's activities at that time.
Toggle Commented Mar 5, 2015 on A time of unrest at Word Wenches
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You're right, Sue, that some events seem to draw authors like wasps to jam. LOL on the Titanic!
Toggle Commented Mar 5, 2015 on A time of unrest at Word Wenches
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