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Jobev
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Interesting, Shannon. This is what I love -- opening a book and finding wonderful stories.
Toggle Commented Aug 19, 2014 on Duels and Divorce in High Places at Word Wenches
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Heavens. Very intertwined! Thanks for that, Lucy.
Toggle Commented Aug 19, 2014 on Duels and Divorce in High Places at Word Wenches
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That could be true, Thea. I don't know. They could have entered the marriages willingly and found them unsatisfactory.
Toggle Commented Aug 19, 2014 on Duels and Divorce in High Places at Word Wenches
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Oh, you're right about it being Charlotte who was Cadogan. I'll leave it or your comment won't make sense. It is hard to keep straight! Fascinating stuff about Captain Cadogan. Such a great collection of characters. Yes, by the time of Waterloo the dust had settled and Wellington was pragmatic enough to use Uxbridge, as he was by then, to the full. Uxbridge famously lost his leg in the battle.
Toggle Commented Aug 18, 2014 on Duels and Divorce in High Places at Word Wenches
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That's true, Lil. Real events have been the spark for some of my stories.
Toggle Commented Aug 18, 2014 on Duels and Divorce in High Places at Word Wenches
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Theo, that is so cool. By far the best "thing on a desk." I remember a story about Dorothy Dunnett, who apparently had a toy parrot in her hallway that repeated back what was last said. She was going to open the door and tripped on something, so the visitor entered to the parrot repeating a stream of rather heated words!
Toggle Commented Aug 18, 2014 on AAW: On our desks . . . at Word Wenches
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Having been decided to go for a fire, a question arose, whether Lord Paget had taken aim, as if intending to hit his antagonist. Both the seconds being clearly of opinion that such was not his intention (although the degree of obliquity he gave the direction of the pistol was such, as to have been discovered only by particular observation), Captain M'Kenzie stated to Captain Cadogan, that as it appeared to be Lord Paget's intention not to fire at him, he could not admit of the affair proceeding any further. Continue reading
Posted Aug 18, 2014 at Word Wenches
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Glad to have a cheer for "historical", Sheila.
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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Bless you for using your empathy to help people, Annette. I can imagine how draining it must be.
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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LOL on "men in kilts" Maggie. Unfortunately screen hits don't seem to affect books that much. The Jane Austen furore didn't do much for the traditional Regency, and as you say, Downton Abbey hasn't led to an upsurge in Edwardian romance. I wonder if creating a new sub-genre of Stately Home Romances might catch on. It sounds rather pompous to me.
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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Delightful, Jana. Fortnight is a useful word. Jo
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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Good point, Molly. I think it's going to be a moving point, however, fixed about 100 years ago. Works for me.
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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"One of the things about historical romance is that genre has changed over time in my mind, so that there's not only eras like Tudor, Medieval, and Regency but eras in the history of the historical romance." Good point, Shannon. One of the good things about e-books is that work is re-appearing from many periods in historical romance and we can find those written 20, 30, 40 years ago. Sometimes they delight. Sometimes they're not what we remembered them to be, or we've changed so that we don't appreciate them any more.
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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Good point, Anna, about no trads in other eras. You might find some in Harlequin Historicals, and also in historical romances put out by the Christian Inspirational publishers. Some are preachy, but many are just good romances whose characters are practicing Christians. Most of my characters are, to a lesser or greater extent, but they do get up to things the Christian Inspirational presses wouldn't approve of. But I've read some good "sweet" stories there.
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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What a great teacher, Judith! Yes, it's about people. I suppose there are people who disdain reading about the past, just as there are some who won't read fantasy. "It's all made up." Let's hear it for a broad imagination, I say! Jo
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Jeannette. I'm not sure if "historical novel" would help, though. I think most people would think that very weighty indeed! Could be wrong. Jo
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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LOL,Kathy. Some descriptions do take up space, don't they? As a reader of mysteries I find some of the short descriptions insufficient. Mystery to me means whodunnit, but some are psychological explorations of whydunnit, or worse for me, explorations of the sleuth's private demons or depressions. Elizabethan spy thriller, eh? Does sound intriguing!
Toggle Commented Aug 4, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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Happy to remind you about introverts, HJ. It does explain a lot. Perhaps Tudor Romance works better than medieval because of The Tudors? Perhaps we need the Downton Romance, or the Stately Home Romance?
Toggle Commented Aug 4, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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I agree about the Strong Alpha heroes, Sonya. I think past-times romances lost ground there when medievals slid. A Regency duke can be rich and powerful, but he's probably not done a lot of broad-sword to broad-sword combat!
Toggle Commented Aug 4, 2014 on Words -Historical at Word Wenches
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Extroverts, in MB, take in energy when they're with people, so tend to choose professions involving a lot of contact with people. I haven't read any data on this but I suspect that extrovert writers are the ones who love to write in a busy coffee shop and seek out as many speaking engagements and media opportunities as they can, or perhaps even have a part time job when they don't need the money. Continue reading
Posted Aug 4, 2014 at Word Wenches
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Jeeves and Wooster. Just the thing for summer relaxation!
Toggle Commented Jul 30, 2014 on What Wenches Recommend - July at Word Wenches
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"Look at Elizabeth Bennett, her two closest friends were her sister Jane and her neighbor Charlotte." Good point, Karin, and of course Jane's closest friend seems to have been her sister Cassandra. Many people had friends by correspondence, often writing daily, which is a bit like e-mail, really! Quite a lot of girls went to school, at least for a while, so I assume they made friends, but unless they happened to end up living close by, or went to London every year, or were keen correspondents, the friendship probably dwindled and they made new one after they married. The governess was the one who could easily end up friendless. However, the same thing could be said of men, especially younger sons, who probably wouldn't live at home or nearby and could wander a lot in their careers. Interesting to think about, really. Jo
Toggle Commented Jul 21, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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"As for historical series focused on male friendships--hmm. Maybe because men had more interesting lives?" They could do a lot more things, but perhaps interest is in the details? Drama in a village as opposed to across Europe? It could be a matter of taste. Cheers, Jo
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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Women finding ways around the strictures of their times. Yes, Maggi. Jo
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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Hmmm, Mary, I have to quibble a bit. The middle ages had a lot of learning, philosophy, politics, intrigue and travel, as well cathedrals, beautiful music, and illuminated manuscripts. It was a complex world, though I agree -- less safe. Jo
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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