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Jobev
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Yes, it is challenging to get right. It's probably a really good mind-body excercise, like tai-chi.
Toggle Commented Feb 18, 2015 on Wooing at Word Wenches
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LOL, Jenny. I suppose the maypole appealed to teachers as a way to get children actively involved.
Toggle Commented Feb 18, 2015 on Wooing at Word Wenches
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That picture is funny, isn't it, Shannon. Perhaps we should imagine it's Lizzie Bennet and her sisters, with Darcy and Bingley. LOL!
Toggle Commented Feb 17, 2015 on Wooing at Word Wenches
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Thanks for the question, Jackie. Yes, people do seem to have been more practical about it all back a ways.
Toggle Commented Feb 17, 2015 on Wooing at Word Wenches
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That sounds fascinating, Mary. I wish I lived closer to Kent.
Toggle Commented Feb 17, 2015 on Wooing at Word Wenches
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We did it at school a few times, Mary Jo. I seem to remember thinking it not worth the effort!
Toggle Commented Feb 17, 2015 on Wooing at Word Wenches
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My impression is that courtship followed similar patterns to today and hopeful lovers had to show their interest in the usual patterns of courtship behaviour, such as showing admiration, teasing, light touching, dancing, and kissing. And there's no season for any of those. The general pattern was as usual for the male to make the moves, but a female would have ways to show interest or encouragement if she wanted to, including showing off her domestic skills by baking a cake or sewing a neck cloth or handkerchief. I have the impression that sewing a shirt for a suitor was commitment. Continue reading
Posted Feb 16, 2015 at Word Wenches
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Fascinating, Amanda. I didn't know that about Barbara Castlemaine. She really was a piece of work. Jo
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You're welcome, Danielle
Toggle Commented Jan 31, 2015 on The Canary Islands at Word Wenches
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It's a place to go from England and be pretty sure of warm sun. Most other European places are iffy in January.
Toggle Commented Jan 31, 2015 on The Canary Islands at Word Wenches
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I can imagine the sand all the time. Perhaps volcanic rock is better, but I think it'd be rough. That sounds like an interesting cruise. I went on one that stopped at Madeira, Lanzarote, and I think Tenerife. The trip through the interior of Lanzarote was interesting, but it really is a wasteland.
Toggle Commented Jan 31, 2015 on The Canary Islands at Word Wenches
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Could be, Madge. It's the sort of setting she'd use.
Toggle Commented Jan 31, 2015 on The Canary Islands at Word Wenches
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Yes, I found the history of Lanzarote interesting. A priest there chronicled it all, which is why there's such detail. It must have been terrible to live through.
Toggle Commented Jan 30, 2015 on The Canary Islands at Word Wenches
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Fascinating, Elinor.
Toggle Commented Jan 30, 2015 on The Canary Islands at Word Wenches
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It does seem a shame to be somewhere and only see the airport!
Toggle Commented Jan 30, 2015 on The Canary Islands at Word Wenches
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i, Jo here, doing a photo essay about "what I did on my winter holiday." The Canary Islands. The Canaries are off the north west coast of Africa, so winter sun is pretty well guaranteed, but we had a couple of dull days to begin with. Turns out it was dust and sand in the air, coming from the Sahara. Continue reading
Posted Jan 30, 2015 at Word Wenches
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Pat, I notice the lack of veggies, too. They did turn up in side dishes, but as you say, usually in sauces. However, they did relish the best seasonal veggies, like fresh peas and asparagus. However, a housewifery book I have lists many veggies in season. For June it lists carrots, celery, cabbage, asparagus, beans, peas, artichokes, cucumber, radishes. In July she adds cauliflowers, lettuce, endives, spinach and sweet herbs. Also onions, garlic, salsify, and red beet, plus tomato, which she says deserves to be brought into universal practice, so it probably wasn't much used. So really, as I said in another comment somewhere, it's odd that our manly heroes are rarely seen to be eating their veggies as the best ones in season were probably the prize dish on the table. :)
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2015 on Regency Diet at Word Wenches
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I enjoy Lee Child too, Anne. I was surprised by that as I don't usually like hard-bitten action/suspense. I think it's because of Jack Reacher. He doesn't go looking for trouble or picking fights just to show how tough he is. My variations are SF and F with some cozy mysteries. You might enjoy Sharon Lee and Steve Miller's Liaden universe books. www.korval.com. I'm never sure where to tell people to start as they've written forward and backward in their timeline, but Local Custom is one of my favourites and it's a romance.
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Fascinating blog and comments! I confess that it never occurred to me that some readers would be so uncomfortable with smoking in an historical context. Perhaps it's because I grew up when it was common and most evening events would be in a fug. Perhaps it's because it is part of the times, especially the pipe. And snuff. To leave them out entirely is rather like everyone being vegetarian. :) I agree about smoker's breath, but also with whoever mentioned morning breath. We seem to be willing to suspend reality there so I'm happy to do it with the smoking -- and the drinking though that doesn't bother me at all. A brandy kiss can be quite delightful. As a reader I'm willing to go with the flow on a lot of things. Characters, especially men, really don't eat many vegetables in books but I don't worry about their health over that. The coal fires could harm the lungs, especially with a slightly smoky chimney in a well-draft-proofed room. In most places the water wasn't safe to drink, but characters down it greedily instead of getting some small beer, which was safe and low alcohol. The idea of hookahs is interesting. I think some people associate them with illegal drugs but generally they use tobacco and might carry less risk. I'm sure they were used in Britain, brought back from Italy et al on the Grand Tour, and from the Middle East and India by merchants and diplomats.
Toggle Commented Jan 17, 2015 on Regency tobacco and How to Puff It at Word Wenches
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I like the Annual Registers too, Nancy. I bought have all the Regency ones long ago and they've proved useful and interesting.
Toggle Commented Jan 10, 2015 on Friday January 9th, 1818 at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Glenda
Toggle Commented Jan 10, 2015 on Friday January 9th, 1818 at Word Wenches
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I've decided they have to have used the equivalent of a press release. In the case of royalty I think it was considered the public's right to know where they were and what they were doing, especially at a time of national crisis.
Toggle Commented Jan 10, 2015 on Friday January 9th, 1818 at Word Wenches
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As my MIP is right in this period, it might turn up in my book. Don't have any balls planned yet, but as you say, tempting. :)
Toggle Commented Jan 9, 2015 on Friday January 9th, 1818 at Word Wenches
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That's right, Elinor. I thought the formality of the item in the paper was interesting, though.
Toggle Commented Jan 9, 2015 on Friday January 9th, 1818 at Word Wenches
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You're welcome, Rose. I love the old papers, too. It's like peeping through a window into the past.
Toggle Commented Jan 9, 2015 on Friday January 9th, 1818 at Word Wenches
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