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Jobev
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LOL, on the feathers, Laura. Yes, those old beds were usually high and had steps. That's where we get "climbing out of bed" from. I'm pretty sure the hotel would have had steps, though, so it's hard to see how a rope at the end would help with "climbing out of bed." Begins to sound a bit like mountaineering, though!
Toggle Commented 7 hours ago on Travel at Word Wenches
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"As for the rope at the foot of the bed, I had an odd notion of seeing as a "loop". Was it designed so you slipped your feet underneath and then could roll up, much like an old-fashioned sit-up?" That's intriguing, Shannon. I was wondering what use a rope at the bottom of the bed was for pulling up, but anchoring the feet.... It's still odd, though.
Toggle Commented 7 hours ago on Travel at Word Wenches
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That's possible, Lil. Or it might be because it wouldn't keep as well as the fortified wine? You'll enjoy the book. So many interesting details.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Travel at Word Wenches
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Fascinating, Louisa.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Travel at Word Wenches
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Correct about the pockets. I've seen mentions of those before. But not for scent. Because scent was expensive, or you scented the bed?
Toggle Commented yesterday on Travel at Word Wenches
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Yes, perhaps it was because the beds were so high off the ground. You couldn't just roll off. Oh, to reach through a book and ask what he meant!
Toggle Commented yesterday on Travel at Word Wenches
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The rope is odd, isn't it? You might have an idea about the soft beds. Down mattresses are very easy to wallow in, but I've never come across the idea before.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Travel at Word Wenches
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I agree, Lil!
Toggle Commented yesterday on Travel at Word Wenches
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HJ, I've read Georgian sources where people are described as adding a tiny bit of cream to tea, so I think patterns changed. I agree. No one now would put cream in tea in England. Clotted cream for scones? Possibly, but it just sounds odd, doesn't it?
Toggle Commented yesterday on Travel at Word Wenches
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True about bedding, Sonya.But a couple of generations earlier it was common for wealthier people to travel with their own bedding. From the comment in the book it seems it was still that way in Poland.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Travel at Word Wenches
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Hi, Jo here. I'm going to be nerdy today, because I have to share some tid-bits from a wonderful book I stumbled across in a clearance catalogue. LONDON OBSERVED: A Polish Philosopher at Large, 1820-24. You can get your own copy quite cheaply on line. This link will take you to Amazon in the US. Lach 1820-24 a little after my current books, which are set in 1817, but close enough to enrich my knowledge base because Krystyn Lach-Szyrma is the sort of traveler who loves to record details of his travel. I'm simply going to share some. I never take one source as gospel, and I have questions about some bits. He might not always be accurate, and I'm reading in translation, but here it is. Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Word Wenches
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Sidney Carton = Dirk Bogard in the film. ::sigh::
Toggle Commented Oct 17, 2014 on The First Book Crush at Word Wenches
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Part of his power to attract is that he makes mistakes -- sometimes on a massive scale, but as he says somewhere, he takes responsibility for them and does his best to fix the damage.
Toggle Commented Oct 17, 2014 on The First Book Crush at Word Wenches
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I'm a bit of a contrarian on under-dogs. They get such a good deal in fiction, movies etc that I tend to side with the beleaguered establishment figure who's trying to keep things on an even keel. Because in turmoil, a lot of innocent people get hurt.
Toggle Commented Oct 17, 2014 on The First Book Crush at Word Wenches
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LOL on the J, Lil! I fell in love with some Jacobites in my teens, but fell out of love later as I came to understand the political complexities. Was always on the side of the poor aristos in the French Revolution, and still would side with them, I think, because of the unleashing of terror and anarchy, which then led to a kind of dictatorship under Napoleon. That forms an element of my next book, in fact.
Toggle Commented Oct 15, 2014 on The First Book Crush at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Jo, JoRead the Rogues. The longest lived series of Regency heroes. http://www.jobev.com/rogues.html
Toggle Commented Oct 14, 2014 on Joan Wolf, here at Word Wenches at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Sheila. Cover, title, author, back copy. All the things that make us buy a book!
Toggle Commented Oct 10, 2014 on Covers at Word Wenches
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I agree about those covers, but they wouldn't work for romance IMO. The dark mystery element would be misleading for most. Often it's the tone of a cover that has the most impact, which is why I think it's a shame that some really don't have any.
Toggle Commented Oct 10, 2014 on Covers at Word Wenches
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Yes, Kiera, Harl H do often do good covers, and they publish a wide range of historicals as well.
Toggle Commented Oct 10, 2014 on Covers at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Karin. Those covers were lovely. Most of them. I wasn't at all happy with The Stolen Bride. Randal looked about 18 and Sophie looked like a shop window mannequin!
Toggle Commented Oct 10, 2014 on Covers at Word Wenches
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LOL on the tartan, Constance! But yes, done well just title and author can work very well.
Toggle Commented Oct 10, 2014 on Covers at Word Wenches
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You're right, Mary. Covers are important. Sometimes they're also misleading -- both ways! There should be a truth in advertizing rule. :)
Toggle Commented Oct 10, 2014 on Covers at Word Wenches
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I so agree, Sonya. It's the way the characters aren't of our time that makes them really interesting to explore.
Toggle Commented Oct 10, 2014 on Covers at Word Wenches
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Welcome to the Wenches, Joan. I share you love of your Dark Ages books. Love your take on the Arthurian story.
Toggle Commented Oct 10, 2014 on Joan Wolf, here at Word Wenches at Word Wenches
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Good point, Claire, about back copy. That's a clincher for me, too, and sometimes it's a turn off. I know authors sometimes don't have any say, but if it makes the plot sound nonsense, or includes inaccuracies, it puts me off.
Toggle Commented Oct 9, 2014 on Covers at Word Wenches
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