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Jobev
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Lovely post, and yes, I think many of the simple pleasures are eternal, such as the warmth of the sun and the delights of plants and water. I love the seashore. And music. In the past, with less technological entertainment, music was much more part of people's lives, rich and poor. Anyone can have music, even if only singing. One of the bleak things about the past was when people were in Victorian cities often cut off from the country, but it's admirable how many places built parks for the people to enjoy. Often they were the work of benefactors, who might also make it possible for the poor to get into the countryside or to the seashore. A lot of smaller industrial towns in the north were close to lovely dale and moorland and people would walk out on days off to enjoy that. Jo
Toggle Commented yesterday on Simple Pleasures Then and Now at Word Wenches
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On white, I just came across a bit in Richard Rush's account of his time as American Ambassador to St. James's and he arrive as the mourning for Princess Charlotte (died early November 1817) was ongoing. And it lasted. Jan 20th 1818 Dined at Lord Castlereagh's. "All were in full black, under the court mourning for the Princess Charlotte." (I believe he's wrong here in that official court mourning had ended, but no one stopped. The whole country persisted.) "one lady was in white satin! It would have been painfully embarrassing but that her union of ease and dignity allowed her, after the first suffusion, to turn her misfortune into grace." Now it could have been the shiny satin, but the impression is that the main issue was white. There were a number of foreign ambassadors at the dinner along with their wives so it was probably a foreign lady.
Toggle Commented Apr 10, 2015 on Fifty Shades of Black at Word Wenches
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That is interesting, Frances. You could probably write a research paper on the subject. I know I go for jewel colours most of the time, as I like them.
Toggle Commented Apr 10, 2015 on Fifty Shades of Black at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Dee.
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Just a few Rogues here, Karin. I only bring in the ones with a role to play. And who are around. Not all of them would be in London in autumn. I hope there are enough for you.
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Thanks for loving the books so much, Lynne
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Thanks, Chi-An
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Thanks, Laurie.
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Thanks, Diane. I try not to weigh down the books with too much history, but they are all set in a precise time because of the narrative flow, and I have to find out about that time. Then it seems reasonable to include some of it. After all, people do live in their time, and even if they're not involved in politics and live quietly, they'll be aware of some events and gossip about the latest hot news or alarm.
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Glenda, I suspect the Rogues World will continue as long as I do. I'm writing a spin off now, and there are some characters from past books that people want more of. There's also the other dead Rogue's family -- the Ingrams. I haven't found out much about them as yet.
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Thanks, Louisa. Perhaps it also speaks to my hating to let my characters go. *G*
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I hope you enjoy it. :)
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Vicki, isn't that the solution to immortality? Too many books to read? A huge TBR is better than nothing to read, IMO.
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Good luck, Suzanne. :)
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But it's a nice sort of problem, don't you think?
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Thanks, Elaine. I really enjoyed writing the medievals and I wish I could have continued them, but the sales were so low compared to the Regencies and Georgians. And now, I just don't seem to have the time. I play a little in novellas, as in The Raven and the Rose and The Dragon and the Princess. (Fantasy, but still medievalish.)
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How long will it take you to read 15 books, Betsy? It must be interesting to read straight through, though. I keep meaning to do it myself.
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Thanks, Susan. One of the fun things about writing the Rogues series is that the original Rogues were all different. Nicholas chose them in part for that. So they give different stories, which avoids my becoming bored.
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Thanks, Kate!
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I hope you enjoy it, Diana. I really appreciate the readers who are as fond of the Rogues as I am. Thank you.
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Thanks, Annette. Yes, war has its costs, even for the victors. I like Hermione a lot. She's sensible. Most of the time. :) I suppose another line could be "No woman in love can be sensible all the time."
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Thanks, Janga. One of the delights of e-publishing is that all the books in a series are available. It used to be so frustrating, for me and for readers.
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Linda, I agree with Mary Jo. Too Dangerous for a Lady isn't a bad place to start, because they're both new characters to the series. I hope you enjoy it and the Rogues.
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Go for it, Sarah! There is a web page about the Rogues here, including a video intro. http://jobev.com/rogues.html
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Thank you, Diane. I'm very pleased you enjoyed it, and that you'll read more Rogues. I'd recommend starting at the beginning with An Arranged Marriage. There is a narrative flow.
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