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Jobev
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Thanks, lilmissmolly. :)
Toggle Commented yesterday on The Romance of Christmas at Word Wenches
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Good point about children, Quantum. I wonder if we don't see them that often because of that risk of it becoming too sentimental, especially in novel length. If there's a real plot around the children, plus the romance, it could easily become overwhelming.
Toggle Commented yesterday on The Romance of Christmas at Word Wenches
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That sounds like an interesting collection, Sharon. There don't seem to be as many Christmas collections in historical, do there? I wonder why.
Toggle Commented yesterday on The Romance of Christmas at Word Wenches
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Interesting point, Karin, about Christmas stories not having dark elements. It's a great time for healing, though, isn't it?
Toggle Commented yesterday on The Romance of Christmas at Word Wenches
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A week in the booze, Cate. That should be impressive. I clearly must read The Mischief of the Mistletoe
Toggle Commented yesterday on The Romance of Christmas at Word Wenches
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You're right, Vicki. Christmas is a character! In mentioning the stand-in fiance, I was meaning in Christmas novellas. It should work, I suppose.
Toggle Commented yesterday on The Romance of Christmas at Word Wenches
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LOL, Shannon! That's my novella in The Christmas Cat. My story is A Gift of Light, mentioned above. It's one of the novellas in the Mistletoe Kisses boxed set.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on The Romance of Christmas at Word Wenches
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That sounds like a fun collection, Samantha!
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on The Romance of Christmas at Word Wenches
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Yes, I think A Christmas Carol is the first Christmas fiction, and it does have many of the elements. It was part of a Christmas revival movement, because during the Regency and for a while later the old traditions were seen as pagan. The "bring back Christmas" people argued that it was a time for healing rifts and strengthening the community.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on The Romance of Christmas at Word Wenches
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I'm not sure there are more of them, Dory, but I think it's the contrast/conflict that makes Christmas mysteries work. In the season of joy, we have anger and misery under the surface.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on The Romance of Christmas at Word Wenches
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I don't remember coming across the stand in, Robin. I wonder if that's more common in contemporaries. In historicals, mostly people knew who was who. It would be much harder to slip in a ringer!
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on The Romance of Christmas at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Juanita!
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Thanks for the suggestions, Shannon. I wonder if beta heroes are a particularly good fit with Christmas.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on The Romance of Christmas at Word Wenches
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'Tis the season, and though Charlie and Billy aren't yet in their Christmas clothes this year, I found myself thinking about the appeal of Christmas romances. I hope you don't groan that it's too early, but they're already hitting the bestseller lists. No other genre creates as many Christmas themed stories. That's my observation, at least. Am I wrong? I think it's because Christmas and romance are so in tune. I'm not talking about the religious festival, but the social celebration, which is often shared by non-Christians and atheists. It's not an unsullied celebration. Some of us aren't happy with the commercialism, and the whole business of sending cards and buying presents can become a burden. Often on the women of the family, yes? The family gatherings can highlight stresses and open old wounds, or at the least oblige people to behave well around people they don't like. I don't think that's a bad thing. It's the sort of behaviour that keeps the world together. Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Word Wenches
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I do always put an author's note in the back of the book to explain anything I think new and interesting. It's there if readers want it, but not intrusive for those who don't. And it helps me restrain myself from dumping it all in the storyline!*G*
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Thanks, Lillian.
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I've mentioned Davy a time or two because he gave very popular science lectures during the Regency. The ton often were interested in science and engineering, at least for the whizz-bang and flash, but sometimes with more depth.
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Joanna, I see we share the yen for fantasy. I have written some SF and fantasy (but no real fantasy published.) I love the expanded possibilities in storylines, especially relationships. Mating rules, for example. They can be set up to create relationship dynamics very different to ones most people have operated by. There's an interesting SF book called Courtship Rite by Donald Kingsbury about a society with complex group marriages. Then there's the lovely A Brother's Price by Wen Spencer, where there are so few men their mating has to be carefully managed by the women...
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Welcome, Susanna! How interesting that you're writing from the edges of Henry VIII's reign. Some of the middle ground is so well trodden. I've always thought of Jane Seymour as a footnote (to mix my metaphors!) so I'll have to check this out. Katherine Parr, OTOH, has always fascinated me. Very interesting question about whether the characters I create would like me. Oh dear.... I shall have to go and have a stiff drink!
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Definitely people used the rags, well into the 20th century. Your poor grandmother!
Toggle Commented Nov 11, 2014 on The Monthly at Word Wenches
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Mary, I remember the embarrassment of asking for sanitary towels in the chemist. Not logical, but as a teenager it felt like admitting something terrible. Ouch on bushes between the legs! I too doubt the ladies' convenience during dinner. They would leave fairly early, leaving the men to drink on, so I doubt it would be necessary, and I'm sure they'd prefer to to elsewhere if necessary. After all, male urination is less complicated than female.
Toggle Commented Nov 11, 2014 on The Monthly at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Hope. I'm glad you enjoy my books. Good point about the smell. I think a lot of today's readers would be put off by that. As societies we tend to think most natural smells unpleasant and suppress them with with deodorants of one sort or another. I can remember one well known American author saying that the hero and heroine NEVER smell unless it's soap or perfume. These days sweat is okay, but only if it's fresh. Not day old! I sort of thing that's an inhibition.
Toggle Commented Nov 11, 2014 on The Monthly at Word Wenches
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Yes, Jenny, it does seem that menstruation started later in the past. Some of it might have been down to nutrition. It would be interesting to know if rich girls menstruated earlierp
Toggle Commented Nov 11, 2014 on The Monthly at Word Wenches
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Early surgical menopause is tough, Didi. Hugs on that.
Toggle Commented Nov 11, 2014 on The Monthly at Word Wenches
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Lil, you're right that most women wouldn't have been able to take to their beds, Of course a lot of women didn't have many periods in their lives. They started late and then had a lot of children. Breastfeeding could pause their periods for a year or more and then they got pregnant again.
Toggle Commented Nov 11, 2014 on The Monthly at Word Wenches
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