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Jobev
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Jeeves and Wooster. Just the thing for summer relaxation!
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on What Wenches Recommend - July at Word Wenches
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"Look at Elizabeth Bennett, her two closest friends were her sister Jane and her neighbor Charlotte." Good point, Karin, and of course Jane's closest friend seems to have been her sister Cassandra. Many people had friends by correspondence, often writing daily, which is a bit like e-mail, really! Quite a lot of girls went to school, at least for a while, so I assume they made friends, but unless they happened to end up living close by, or went to London every year, or were keen correspondents, the friendship probably dwindled and they made new one after they married. The governess was the one who could easily end up friendless. However, the same thing could be said of men, especially younger sons, who probably wouldn't live at home or nearby and could wander a lot in their careers. Interesting to think about, really. Jo
Toggle Commented Jul 21, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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"As for historical series focused on male friendships--hmm. Maybe because men had more interesting lives?" They could do a lot more things, but perhaps interest is in the details? Drama in a village as opposed to across Europe? It could be a matter of taste. Cheers, Jo
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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Women finding ways around the strictures of their times. Yes, Maggi. Jo
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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Hmmm, Mary, I have to quibble a bit. The middle ages had a lot of learning, philosophy, politics, intrigue and travel, as well cathedrals, beautiful music, and illuminated manuscripts. It was a complex world, though I agree -- less safe. Jo
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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"I want to read books that allow people to learn to care for one another." Amen, Annette. Jo
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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Good point, Nancy, about the interests of the woman in the period. I agree that we see too many heroines pining for careers. Some did, but most wanted more rights and powers within traditional women's roles. Jo
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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Good points, Shannon. Another is that Almack pinched the idea of exclusive assemblies from a woman -- Teresa Cornelys, who began them in London in the 18th century. (She's a character in my book A Lady's Secret.) She came up with the idea of making them exclusive and recruiting some high ranking ladies to vet applicants. She wasn't a great businesswoman, however, and Almack's saw, copied, and made a better go of it. She did, however, have Casanova as one of her lovers. Cheers, Jo
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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Jeannette, I think the Regency period is on a sort of comfort tipping point, yes.We can relate better to the problems then. I do think, however, that most women's ability to rebel was lessened by a strong imposition of propriety. There was less of that in the 18th century, and the situation got worse as the 19th century progressed. So yes, a tripping point again.
Toggle Commented Jul 18, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Sonya. I agree that the gender balance in historicals needs to be right for the period, but there always have been women who broke the rules and got away with it! Right on about the "almost." Jo :)
Toggle Commented Jul 18, 2014 on The battle between the sexes at Word Wenches
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If romance is all about women's struggle in a man's world, then it seems clear that the struggle is more vivid in historicals, where most women in most times and places had far fewer rights, powers, and opportunities than today. But then, why is the 19th century more popular than earlier ones, such as medieval, when the situation was more dramatically unequal before the law? Continue reading
Posted Jul 18, 2014 at Word Wenches
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Not sure of the fee, Mary Jo, but I'd guess something in the range of 10 shillings. A meaningful amount for most people, but not a huge deterrent. I don't believe there was a waiting time because they would be marrying in the parish of one or the others, openly in the community. I don't think the 3 weeks of banns was a delaying tactic so much as making sure that anyone interested was likely to hear the announcement. The special licence allowed much more variation in place and time, including the ceremony being away from their normal place of living and in private.
Toggle Commented Jul 3, 2014 on weddings at Word Wenches
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Yes, Carol, a special licence was issued by the Archbishop of Canterbury, but it didn't have to be him personally. His officials could do it, especially from the office in London. Jo
Toggle Commented Jul 3, 2014 on weddings at Word Wenches
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Sonya, we have to remember that many women gave birth without dying. There were many more untimely deaths back then, and statistics seem to show that women had a greater chance of dying in an accident or by general illness than in childbirth, though it certainly was a risky time. Of course men had many causes of untimely death, too. Illness, more "industrial accidents, general violence and, of course, war.
Toggle Commented Jul 3, 2014 on weddings at Word Wenches
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LOL, Annette! That's quite an image.
Toggle Commented Jul 3, 2014 on weddings at Word Wenches
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I think there was a bit about various positions he held, Juanita, but not much.
Toggle Commented Jul 3, 2014 on weddings at Word Wenches
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That is tricky, Fiona, but presents all kinds of possibilities.
Toggle Commented Jul 3, 2014 on weddings at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Darcie.
Toggle Commented Jul 3, 2014 on weddings at Word Wenches
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Thanks, HJ
Toggle Commented Jul 2, 2014 on weddings at Word Wenches
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You're welcome, Anne.
Toggle Commented Jul 2, 2014 on weddings at Word Wenches
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Whether by banns or licence, the marriage had to be "openly solemnized in the parish church where one of the parties dwelleth, or the church mentioned in the licence, between the hours of eight and twelve in the morning." If the marriage wasn't celebrated in the church of one of them, I think there would be questions if there wasn't a good reason. The word "openly" is important. It meant that the wedding couldn't be private. Anyone could enter the church and witness it. Again, it had to be open to the scrutiny of those who knew them. Continue reading
Posted Jul 2, 2014 at Word Wenches
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Lil, back in the Regency they tended to disperse a bit earlier for the reason you give, but it was, as Nicola says, a lot to do with when Parliament was sitting. The MPs also wanted to get away from London in the hot weather, but sometimes they were stuck. They'd started to go to the seaside for the hotter weather, such as Brighton.
Toggle Commented Jun 18, 2014 on The Season Then and Now at Word Wenches
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Interesting, Sarah. I'm not sure about that, or perhaps they each have a bit. Rothgar's tortured by factors in his early life, but beyond that he's not blasted again and again as Lymond is, though I agree on the "love you but can't marry you." I'd never thought of that! Different reasons, though. You're right that Nicholas isn't tortured. The element I took there is that he's a natural, charistmatic leader but realizes the dangers of it and does his best to retreat. Again, he more or less gets to do that, as I'm not nearly as tough an author as Dunnett! Thanks for the comment.
Toggle Commented Jun 18, 2014 on AAW June--Putting people in books: at Word Wenches
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For some reason I always want to call it trompe d'oeil, perhaps because it'd fall more easily from the tongue with a hard D in the middle. I think l'oeil is one of those words we have to pretend we speak really good French and go for it with tongue, teeth and lips. It can't kind of slide out in a drawl. :)
Toggle Commented Jun 14, 2014 on Fool the eye at Word Wenches
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Those are amazing, Laura. Are they really temporary?
Toggle Commented Jun 13, 2014 on Fool the eye at Word Wenches
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