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Joanne Bourne
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A son with such questions. You are so lucky.
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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I didn't remember till just now, when you mentioned it. And yes. A red petticoat would have been era appropriate and a kind, funning, gift.
Toggle Commented Jan 27, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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>>>sugared to make them stiffer<<< Oh my. That's one of the things I never knew. How fascinating. I wonder if they did something like that in earlier days .... though I suppose starch would have been much cheaper before the 20th Century.
Toggle Commented Jan 27, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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The Eighteenth Century paintings of banyans show us such beautiful fabrics. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_TgZU5tQSskI/TCanbXzHCpI/AAAAAAAAA-A/UZ9STDfVN28/s1600/Benjamin_Rush_Painting_by_Peale_1783.jpg https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/J_S_Copley_-_Nicolas_Boylston.jpg https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/a3/24/db/a324dbc465b59e750fa6fb14a78730bb.jpg
Toggle Commented Jan 24, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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The crinolines and almost horizontal skirts of the Fifties were what my older sisters wore. I don't reeealy remember so much doing it myself. To the eye of memory it does look so fancy and fun.
Toggle Commented Jan 24, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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There's something ... what's the word I'm looking for? ...something festive about getting dressed up in several layers. I don't think we'll lose dresses altogether in the foreseeable future, but there is certainly a move to trousers for all occasions. "Oh good," says I.
Toggle Commented Jan 24, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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This is a good time to be a woman. We have such a wide choice of clothing. Nobody's going to look askance at a woman in trousers in almost any situation, formal or informal. And there's a skirted outfit to match about every place one could go, short of participating in mud wrestling or touch football. Yeah for modern times, says I.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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Me, too. How the Victorian women must have suffered in hot climates. The men as well with their tall stiff collars and tweed jackets.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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I remember an old cartoon. The woman goes into one of those beach cabanas to change into her bathing suit. The wind blows the door open and her male friend sees her in her slip. "Shriek!" goes the young woman, clad only in her slip, and clutches a towel to herself. The door blows closed again. A few minutes later she emerges, perfectly comfortable, dressed in a teeny-tiny bikini. That expressed something complex about modesty, I suppose. The same ... ah ... crotch that would be most apparent when wearing jeans becomes mysterious and immodest if seen through a skirt.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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I have this love/hate relationship with synthetic fabrics. Yes, they're beautiful. Yes, they can wear like iron when silk or even cotton won't. Yes, they let us get away without spending a fortune. But they never quite pamper my skin the way silk or high-quality cotton or rayon does.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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Wow. Now I have this mental picture of some unfortunate class who didn't get so well trained. A whole row of hoops flying up ...!
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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I love the re-enactors who post things like this. Only way to understand something so complicated. Thank you, re-enactors.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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I do remember that famous photo. So hard to live a life in the public eye. I feel so sorry for folks who have to do this. And a good reminder for folks who have to 'dress up' for work in skirts. My mother always told me* to CHECK on how see-through stuff is. *classify this as good advice my mother gave me. I guess the equivalent good advice from Mom nowadays involves not posting nekkid selfies or something
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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I associate slips and petticoats with school, being old enough to remember when the idea of wearing trousers or jeans to class just didn't exist. Even in massive horrible cold and snow, you wore a skirt. You put your snow trousers on under the skirt for the long walk to school and wriggled out of it in the cloakroom.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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I, too, have made the transition from any sort of skirt to trousers. I will say, though, that a skirt is cool in summer. I keep a few light summery dresses on hand. And I have some warm floor-length outfits I wear around the house when it's cold out and I'm warm next to the fire. Skirts just cuddle around you and feel kind. No undergarments for those though. I should try out a cotton slip with the summer dress.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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Nobody is tougher than a tough old granny. And I have to say that red petticoats are madly traditional. Red cloaks too. Country women wore long, hooded red wool cloaks all through the Regency and beyond. I love that. I love the modest woman, dressed in practical dark clothing, with that red petticoat underneath.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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It's nice to have different mode of dress. Something 'for special'. We've lost some of that in our quest for comfort and utility. Who knows ... maybe a limited formality will make a comeback. Might be interesting to see what we'd do with all the materials we have now.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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Those layers of underclothing are necessary for formal costume. One doesn't just wear the dress and some skin. There's structure underneath. And yes, the sound is part of the experience. Writer heroines in the Georgian period, for instance, one would have to imagine the complication of that underclothing. And the sound of it.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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What Anne said. The West imported the fabric and the name and the idea of a long garment for leisure at home. I like the idea of the hero wearing a banyan. He'd likely have something on underneath, though. English houses of the Regency period were coooold. Brr.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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Crinolines. No. I'm not going to ask why one took crinolines to camp. No. Not going to ask. Nope.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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I remember wearing slips. It was "But somebody will SEE THROUGH", which I suppose was true. But they could have guessed I had legs if they really tried. Lots of the history of undergarments of the slip, smock, petticoat type is that it protected the expensive outer clothing from the sweating body beneath. A smock could be washed more easily than velvet or wool. Wool, IMO, is an excellent reason for wearing a petticoat.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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This is great. In bright hot sunlight weather our clothing is protection against the sun. A layer of cotton would pay back by blocking the sun. And a long skirt probably catches lots of wind as it blows by. A skirt is cooler than jeans, actually.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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I have a sister who wears petticoats and 50s skirts to do dance and thereby has quite unlimited fun with others of her ilk. I think -- I don't know -- that you buy the poodle skirts and petticoats from dance costume suppliers who will also sell you belly-dancing rig and leotards if you are that way inclined. I am so delighted by variety of mankind.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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I remember wearing petticoats, but just on the edge of memory. I think they were stiff and unpleasant. I don't understand women's clothing. This is where I say something like, "If we can send a man to the moon, why can't we make comfortable clothing?" But I imagine space suits are uncomfortable in the extreme. I want blue jeans and a tee shirt to become high fashion.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2016 on Petticoats and Plantagenets at Word Wenches
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Image
Originally the ‘little coat’ was indeed a little coat. Worn by men. In fact, worn by men in battle under their armor. The petty coat or gambeson was a short padded jacket worn to keep all that warlike fitted metal from chafing those manly muscles. This is not the sort of thing I ponder upon every day, but it occurs to me the simple act of wearing metal was probably fairly uncomfortable all by itself, without any battles going on, not to mention chilly in winter. Continue reading
Posted Jan 19, 2016 at Word Wenches
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