This is Joanne Bourne's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Joanne Bourne's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Joanne Bourne
Recent Activity
Feta cheese is my great love. Back in grad school I'd buy a big tin of Feta cheese in brine and it would last for weeks.
1 reply
I don't know what, if anything, they do now ...
1 reply
Back when I used to live and work in London I'd come home after a long exhausting day an put my feet up in front of the TV and watch the sheep dog trials. Wow. Those dogs. Extreme sheep dog herding: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qniwI2hNhDs
1 reply
What a fascinating family history. And the story of your father being sent out with the sheep at age 7 is the story of shepherd boys from the dawn of time. I wear a thick red-and-black checked wool shirt in the winter to keep warm. There's nothing like it to keep you going in a mountain winter. The red and black check keeps me getting shot by hunters so it's a twofer. As long as the wool doesn't touch my skin, it's perfectly cuddly and fine. I don't trust any of these synthetic fibers when it gets below freezing. Call me old fashioned. Wool in the blood.I like that.
1 reply
*g* Probably not what they called themselves ... The Tarantine sheep were named after a city and province in Italy, Taranto. So "Tarantine" might be an approximation of some other word that sounded similar. When I get through with the alpaca/wool mix yarn I have, I'll seek out something else exotic. (exotic to me ...)
1 reply
Farm animals are (to humans) pretty smelly. I don't know quite why this would be so, but it is. I have not spent enough time in the company of sheep to have a good, accurate sense of how sheep fit into the hierarchy of domestic animals. My main encounters are on farms, where the sheep keep a wary distance from me, and at the county fair where -- I am being frank here -- the pigs seem worse. And the popcorn vendors.
1 reply
I didn't know that about Siamese cats. They are not like other breeds of cats so I am not at all surprised they have a fondness for destroying wool unique among felines.
1 reply
I imagine Scotland brought in Merinos early -- being, as you say, folks who appreciated good sheep. In celebration of a valuable and courageous woman, (from Scotland,) here's the story of Eliza Furlong. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merino (about half way down the page.
1 reply
Australia was in the first wave of countries that established a Merino sheep industry. Early adopters, so to speak.
1 reply
Sheep could be stubborn, I think. There's a BBC reenactment of a 1600s farmstead. This episode does sheep shearing. Great good fun to watch, and the process hadn't changed all that much between then and the Regency. The sheep shearing starts about 1.00 on the tape. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkXWFCbir3k
1 reply
That IS a funny video clip. Now I sit here wondering WHY the sheep follow the dog. Curiosity? The certainty that somebody that enthusiastic will lead them someplace interesting?
1 reply
I was delighted to discover in the course of research that llamas are used to guard flocks of sheep from smaller predators. Not wolves, but foxes and wild dogs. Apparently the llamas come to feel like on of the flock and defend their flock fellows. Having somewhat more gumption, they do a good job. I just wonder how somebody discovered this. Putting a llama in with the sheep is not the first thing that would occur to me.
1 reply
I had to look qiviut up. It's the underdown of the musk ox. I see this as a farming opportunity, folks. Northern folks. Far northern folks.
1 reply
I don't see a scene with goats in it in my future. So probably no posting on the history of goats. I am fond of goat cheese, however, so it is not entirely impossible. SmartWool socks appear to be made of Merino wool. Treated in some way? I dunnoh.
1 reply
The simple answer is "probably cheviots", a hardy breed from the Cheviot Hills. A longer answer that talks more about cheviots and begins to scratch the surface of a complex subject can be found here: http://www.bahs.org.uk/AGHR/ARTICLES/16n2a5.pdf
1 reply
Grace Burrowes has several books with what might be called a sheep theme. I think cashmere is made from the fleece of a goat if one wants to get technical about it. I will see some out one of these days and see how it is to knit, since I'm now curious.
1 reply
I can't knit or crochet with wool -- not that I do much of that anyway and I have no skill with either. There's something about holding wool yarn for hours with my sweaty hands that sets off all the sensitivities.
1 reply
Heh heh heh. If somebody jogged your memory, it would come back. It's one of the really cool myths, and it has a sweet love story.
1 reply
Autocorrect is our downfall. It hates us and it's sly.
1 reply
I wear wool socks and they seem to be okay. I don't know why wool socks should be gentle to the skin. One pair is buffalo wool. Talk about yer strange family holiday presents (that turn out to be utterly cool).
1 reply
That's the nice thing about writing. (One of the nice things.) You get to hang about, indulging yourself with research, and it counts as work. I'm a fan of wool that doesn't touch my skin anywhere, but hate it when it does. Some years wool is too warm for my Virginia mountains. Sometimes it's just right.
1 reply
Image
Sheep are fortunate among domestic animals. In recent millennia their economic value lay in their milk and fleece and not so much as sheep stew, which gave at least some of them a long and toil-free life. Ewes earned their place on the farm as long as they keep sporting the curly white. This was not always so. Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at Word Wenches
45
That is so funny and so wise. Sounds like you handled this beautifully in every way.
1 reply
I'm willing to try just about anything, but I think I'd feel odd and uneasy if I went more than a few days without shampooing my hair or washing my face with soap and water. ... I suppose it's what you're used to, y'know. Probably my great grandchildren will wrinkle their noses in disgust and say something like -- she didn't have antigravity cleaners. Not at ALL.
1 reply
Wood dries stuff out, no question of that. I can lay wet outdoor stuff over the back of a chair near the woodstove and it'll be bone dry in an hour. I think of England as pretty damp -- not so much humid in a Virginia fashion as sort of a cold, sullen grip of chill and wet. When I was in London I had to alternate how I parked my car. If it was always facing the same way I started growing moss on one side.
1 reply