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Joanne Bourne
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I love planting things for the birds. I'm toying with going out and putting in sunflower seeds along the edge of the green space below my place, just to see if it'll survive long enough to put some seeds out. Your beautyberries look very pretty. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Callicarpa
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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Hi Prema -- The fairly small historical research I've done paints a strange picture of Paris in the Terror -- horrible, terrible events ... and also people just going on with their everyday life. It must have been a mind-bending contrast. Maybe that's what London was like during the blitz. Or really, any war. Get up in the morning. "Well, that's another night we lived through. What shall I make for dinner?"
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I always wonder how they make those huge vases. Do they throw them on a wheel? These four- and five- foot high vases have been around for centuries so it's not some new process. Ya just can't overestimate the simple joy to be found in putting something in the soil and watching it grow. As I get somewhat stiff from lack of exercise from time to time, I am coming to be more and more in favor of raised bed for planting.
Toggle Commented Mar 16, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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Petunias! Petunias. I love petunia because they are so exuberant and cooperative. I feel very clever when I deal with petunias. Beautyberry -- I also had never heard of it -- apparently is not just pretty but also sort of edible. Interesting.
Toggle Commented Mar 16, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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I have a friend down in the valley who grows a line of sunflowers along the side of her garden. I should put out a line of seeds and see if anything comes of it.
Toggle Commented Mar 15, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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I always think of temperature as the 'seasonal' force. But water works just as well. I've lived places where the rains come and everything blooms. I envy you folks in CA your orange trees. Man I love them -- leaves, flowers and every stage of the fruit. (jo, still thinking about orange trees.) I did a blog here at Word Wenches on oranges. http://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2013/09/oranges-and-lemons.html
Toggle Commented Mar 15, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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I will give them a try, then, and see if they can dress up my woodland glades. I do well with plants most folks consider weeds. It's my version of shooting fish in a barrel. (I always wonder why somebody would do that.)
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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I have never thought of growing lettuce inside. I will think upon this deeply. Violas ... I wonder if I might try them some year. My gardening is somewhat a matter of putting stuff out and seeing what's left when the deer have wandered through. The experiment this year is primula. I have (jo leans out and looks toward the window and counts,) seven vigorous little pots of them. The soil and climate is well within range. We will see if the deer take 'em out on Day One.
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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I am not a particularly skilled gardener myself. One would call my plants 'hardy standbys'. If my plants were students they'd be the B+ ones who turn in their assignments on time and then they graduate and go off to run the Army or the Space Program or the Wisconsin Farm Bureau. Daffodils fall within my skillset. They are tough little things and, once planted, go about spreading joy and cheer for decades until somebody mistakenly plows them up to put in an asparagus bed. (That never Ends Well.) But if you can grow crocus, you can grow daffs, it seems to me. (jo is encouraging.)
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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I find the cherry tomatoes to hold the most joy. They ripen easily. There are LOTS of them, which my simple nature appreciates. And I find them beautiful in and of themselves. I guess they remind me of Christmas trees. They grow in six gallon (I think that's about the size) pots which I find very clever of them. Suited to a deck or patio, either one, I should think.
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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Yes. It's so pretty, that mix, that it's almost an ornamental.
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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Yes. Everybody from my mountains here in Virginia to Canada is probably holding their breath, waiting to see which cold-sensitive plants didn't make it through the horrendously low temperatures this winter. Maybe it makes us gladder for the ones that do make it through ...
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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I mostly grow in pots on the porch. We are so visited by deer here it's the only way. I will consider carrots and cucumbers. Little ones. That's a good idea.
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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That sounds absolutely fabulous. I am now picturing broad sweeps of geraniums spreading everywhere. I have some in pots. We will see if they survived the winter. I am philosophical about this ... the geraniums themselves are doubtless less so. A long long time ago my sister and I toured Britain by car, going from historic garden to garden and saw so much beauty. So much amazement. I haven't set much fiction in country house gardens. I'll keep them in mind though. Lovely setting.
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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Hydrangeas can fill up a whole yard. Make a tunnel underneath. I know I used to climb under and behind my Grandmother's extensive hydrangea fortress. Now roses I have never grown for some reason. I have a hankering to put in some of the sweet-smelling old climbing roses that have been in gardens forever. Can't do it here in the mountains. Too high, too misty, too damp. But someday.
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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I think keeping house plants in the late 80s is more than challenge enough. And what wonderful stories and memories you'll have of the places you've live and the plants you've known. When I was in West Africa, I grew peanuts. I think that's my oddest plant success.
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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I've been finding 'Cooks Mesclun' most satisfactory. This is a mixture of fancy salad greens -- they have all different sorts of mixtures. Doesn't take any space much. You don't know what's supposed to come up so you're delighted to see whatever is there. You cut and it comes again. And you resow a couple weeks later and get a whole new crop. I go out and pick a bit when I'm feeling philosophical and eat it straight from the ground. Here's one place you can order it. http://www.cooksgarden.com/vegetables/mesclun/
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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The dreaming is important in itself. More important than actually having the tomatoes. Who knows how many people made it through hard times going through the catalog and circling fifty or sixty flower and herb packets. Ya gotta believe.
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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I think very kindly of pots of herbs. Anyone can grow them -- even little kids. They taste good. They smell good. They're pretty. They're in every way satisfying. I wonder if Regency mums in London put herbs in a sunny window and sent the kiddies to pick some for salads.
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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There is a bulb company that sends me the most Beautiful catalog. https://brentandbeckysbulbs.com/ I can just sit and read through it and admire. They have ALL the bulbs. Not cheap, but first quality.
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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I don't know about garden designers at Versailles. The C18 French were more advanced in giving women professional jobs and recognition than the British, in general. So it could be. I'm trying to imagine tomato plants shivering under the snows we've had here in the East Coast of the US I'd feel very sorry for them, poor things.
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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I'm afraid I'm never in time to plant seed tomatoes, so I'm always stuck with what they sell locally in pots. This is a great mistake on my part. Maybe this year I will start tomato seeds. Hmmmm ... which ones. Which ones?
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2015 on Seed Catalogs at Word Wenches
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Anyhow, this got me thinking about woman gardeners in 1800 or so. The eons’ old association of women and healing plants, edible garden herbs, and flowery borders made them natural gardeners. About at this time botany got an intellectual boots with the Linnaean system of plant classification. Thank heavens this was one ‘science’ considered suitable for genteel women. They began collecting plants and writing about them. We have pictures of these women carrying their watering cans — dressed in a way we’d consider problematic for gardening work — headed out to botanize. Continue reading
Posted Mar 12, 2015 at Word Wenches
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Hi Michele -- You're right about searches. So often the top one or two picks answers my question. But then I scan onward and find the most interesting things. What comes to mind in particular are Google image searches. That is a wonderland I can just fall into and come out an hour later ...
Toggle Commented Mar 3, 2015 on What We're Reading in February at Word Wenches
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Oooh. The Liaden Series sounds interesting, as I love both Regency Romance and Space Opera. *g*
Toggle Commented Mar 3, 2015 on What We're Reading in February at Word Wenches
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