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Joanne Bourne
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King_of_hearts_fr.svg Joanna here. GambledAway-hires I’m interviewing Jeannie Lin, writer of most excellent Historical Romances set in Tang Dynasty China and Steampunk set in an alternate but formidably realistic historical China. She writes love, adventure, complicated family relationship, and high stakes in a world that sets all our assumptions wobbling. These are not your everyday Romances, folks. Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Word Wenches
That puts it in words for me. Somehow I thought she'd go on forever.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on In Memoriam: Jo Beverley at Word Wenches
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That's a lovely story. I am so glad to have heard it. Thank you.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on In Memoriam: Jo Beverley at Word Wenches
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We just say what we can. Even a few words help. Just saying we'll miss her and that we respected and liked her is a memorial. There's an old custom. It's a Jewish custom, but it's probably shared by many peoples. When you visit someone's grave you bring a little stone with you and leave it on the grave. That's what I figure my words are. One stone to put with the others.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on In Memoriam: Jo Beverley at Word Wenches
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I was watching Mary Beard on Youtube giving a lecture on the history of the Roman Empire. I was reminded of Jo for some reason. And it came to me that Jo was another of these remarkable women -- intelligent, principled, authentic -- who cut through the cackle and tweep and keep us all centered. A privilege to know her. I'm a better person for it.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on In Memoriam: Jo Beverley at Word Wenches
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My place is pretty small, so I hang only one picture, mostly. One thing an old friend taught me was, you don't have to hang all the art all the time. She'd put up a strong nail and change her artwork every couple months. Kept the collection carefully in a box in the bottom of the closet.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2016 on Buy that art! at Word Wenches
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Now the idea of 'artist's agents' or entrepreneurs in art in Regency times is an intriguing one. I haven't come across examples of this -- but it is so very much not my field of expertise, I wouldn't necessarily have seen it. The Farington Diary by Joseph Farington, RA, is available in print. I have a copy but have done no more than leaf through it since I've never written about a circle of artists. Farington knew a lot of artists and might talk about the business of selling art. I dunnoh.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2016 on Buy that art! at Word Wenches
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I love auctions so much I want to just buy stuff for the fun of it. Everybody should collect something so they can go to auctions and look for it. The 'new look' is great, isn't it? I had about nothing to do with making it so I can just stand back and admire.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2016 on Buy that art! at Word Wenches
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And there's something very special about owning a work that's original, not mass produced. It's sort of a magic that stays in the the canvas and paint because the artist laid it down. I like to think I help the artist earn a living when I buy original art ... though I guess I help living artists who have their art mass produced when I buy that.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2016 on Buy that art! at Word Wenches
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Even my little town here in the hills has a once-yearly juried craft show. There's something quite wonderful about buying work right from the artist or craftsperson. I seldom get away without buy at least a coffee mug. I am a sucker for pottery. And in terms of learning. am with you and your husband on this. We learn so much from artists.
Toggle Commented May 10, 2016 on Buy that art! at Word Wenches
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They certainly had shops that sold art. These would often be print shops since prints would be far cheaper than paintings. Print shop windows might display new and scandalous works. they're shown in contemporary pictures with everyone gathered round. A windy day outside Bowle's Print Shop: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/d6/19/36/d61936964f57e19310cc03d9d8a5c382.jpg The Print Shop Window https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/c9/5f/af/c95fafbbf3d84ddc7f3075019ac0c4cc.jpg And here we see Ackermann's which sold prints, art supplies, and -- see on the walls? -- paintings. https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/67/4a/13/674a138001930726b8b603d9e45bd3ca.jpg The best paintings of the day were hung in exhibitions. This is the 1800 Royal Academy. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e2/The_Exhibition_Room_at_Somerset_House_by_Thomas_Rowlandson_and_Augustus_Pugin._1800..jpg I imagine paintings changed hands from artist to patron at such exhibitions the same way they do at Gallery shows today.
Toggle Commented May 10, 2016 on Buy that art! at Word Wenches
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Let's say you're a rich man in 1800. You own a house in town and have an estate in the country. Maybe you own manufacturies or mills. You buy expensive clothes and horses and carriages. You shower jewels upon your womenfolk. But at the end of the day, you still have more money than you know what to do with. You could gamble, of course. Many men and women managed to subdue a rising fortune by gambling it away. Continue reading
Posted May 8, 2016 at Word Wenches
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I especially loved the combination of realism and magic, everyday life and fantasy. All blended so seamlessly. Just a beautiful book, Named of the Dragon.
Toggle Commented May 1, 2016 on What we've been reading in April at Word Wenches
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I'm glad you had a chance to read Spymaster's Lady and so pleased that you enjoyed it. Patricia Briggs and Jennifer Ashley are wonderful company to be in. The best.
Toggle Commented May 1, 2016 on What we've been reading in April at Word Wenches
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Aaaawww. That is so warm-hearted and insightful. Nothing could mean more than something you make with your own hands.
Toggle Commented Apr 28, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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You confirm something I have long suspected. Marketers send different stuff to the US. I won't say they pawn off the lesser, inferior stuff there ....
Toggle Commented Apr 23, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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Yep. And the evaporated milk is -- so far as I know -- perfectly authentic. It's one of the options used in the Middle East for chai. I even like evaporated milk in coffee. That's the way they drink it in the back woods in Maine where you can't get out to buy fresh milk. And the way one drinks it in Africa where fresh milk is a great luxury and often unavailable. I much prefer evaporated milk to those strange little creamers. (Hey. That's just me. Other folks appreciate the special flavors.)
Toggle Commented Apr 23, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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There's nothing, really, like milk in tea or coffee. The substitutes are not the same. If I can't get milk, I'd rather drink tea or coffee black than use soymilk of the artificial creamers. I'm lucky in that I don't mind drinking it black. Lucky also in the variety and excellence of herb teas these days. I like my herb teas in delicate little china cups, rather than the hand-thrown pottery I generally use. I make some of those cups myself. My favorite herbal is simple peppermint. I don't think I've ever had nettle tea. I understand it's supposed to be good for you.
Toggle Commented Apr 22, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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It's the tea bag that rang the death knell for good tea. A teabag makes usable the broken bits, the veritable crumblings, even the dust, of tea. They contain lord knows what mixture. I'm careful what sort of tea bags I buy and much prefer the loose tea.
Toggle Commented Apr 21, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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There seem to be many shapes and patterns to the Victorian 'flow ware' teapots, all of them quite lovely. The handleless cups would seem to say this is an old set indeed. Your 'iced tea' sounds quite lovely. I live in the South and we are inventive with out teas. Oddly, our Regency folks never seem to have invented iced tea, or cooled tea, or tea-with-ale ...
Toggle Commented Apr 21, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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Oh my. That's a lovely teapot. So jaunty and such an organic shape. How wonderful to pass the 'tea knowledge' on to a next generation. I have a knitted tea cozy for my pot and I feel quite cherishing and protective when I settle it over the brewing tea.
Toggle Commented Apr 21, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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I'm so happy you'll be getting this teapot that you want and that it will be part of such a happy time. The 'cream in tea puzzles' me as well. I mean -- it wouldn't even taste good, leaving aside British custom. Milk (at room temperature) in tea. Or, like, yak butter. Some of it may be American coffee drinkers, well meaning but ignorant. But I wonder. Could this possibly come from folks who have heard of 'cream teas'? A cream tea, for those to whom this is not everyday terminology, is (where would we be without wikipedia) "a form of afternoon ... light meal, consisting of tea taken with a combination of scones, clotted cream, and jam."
Toggle Commented Apr 21, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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I make all kinds of mistakes and I never catch them. I figure a foolish obsession with typos is the hobgoblin of little minds. Or something
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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Yes. Yes. Delicate china cup. I haz 'em. I have all kindsa different cups, one for each mood (and one that the kids made for me that is lopsided.) I will keep what you say about scones in mind. I had almost sorta known this in the back of my mind but I had not focused on the knowledge. Thank you.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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The sugar bowl is huge (I think) for a couple reasons. Sugar was expensive, so it was a display of your prosperity and a kind offering of something special to the guests. Sugar lumps were large and the sugar was less refined. My Aunt used to serve what they now call turbinado sugar but which she called brown sugar -- though it wasn't like the brown sugar I had at home, an early lesson in cultural awareness. Sugar lumps were not uniform. There'd be big ones and small ones and lopsided funny-looking ones. The big bowl let you make a considered and lengthy choice in this important aspect of the tea drinking. I've never been to The Homestead which is not all that distant. Perhaps someday.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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