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Joanne Bourne
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A lot of those we'd call gourds or squashes in the US. (One looks like a delicata squuash. Quite my favorite.
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I love the sound of walking in the woods. So many nuts cracking underfoot. We have acorns, of course. That's most of it. But so many hickory nuts and walnuts.
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In America we think of ourselves as welcoming and being enriched by all cultures. All fruits and veggies, too, I think. When I'm feeling adventurous I pick out something slightly scary in the supermarket and take it home. I get some wins and some looses (and some are doubtless rained out.) Next up on my list will be those yellow star-fruits. Sometime soon.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Meeting new fruits at Word Wenches
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I've never had green mango, though I suppose it would be perfectly easy to do so. We have mango in most markets. So many choices these days.
Toggle Commented Oct 5, 2017 on Meeting new fruits at Word Wenches
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I've only ever had canned lychees. I was not over-impressed. I will remind myself to seek out some fresh ones. I hear such fine things of them.
Toggle Commented Oct 5, 2017 on Meeting new fruits at Word Wenches
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In American Duchess? Cool. Muscadines have always struck me as quite beautiful to look upon, subtly colored and splendidly spherical. I'd like to put stuff like that in a fruit bowl and set it on the counter, but end up keeping them in the refridge.
Toggle Commented Oct 5, 2017 on Meeting new fruits at Word Wenches
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I remember eating pomegranates as a child. They struck me an an overly elaborate sort of fruit and a great deal of work to get not so very much result. I've started seeing them in the supermarket again lately. Are they making a comeback?
Toggle Commented Oct 5, 2017 on Meeting new fruits at Word Wenches
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I was flabberghasted to find out about the Tudor rubbish tip. How very much we don't know about history.
Toggle Commented Oct 5, 2017 on Meeting new fruits at Word Wenches
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Now I'm all anxious to try a red dragon fruit. I'll keep an eye out for it. The rose apple sounds most intriguing.
Toggle Commented Oct 5, 2017 on Meeting new fruits at Word Wenches
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It's not impossible, I suppose. Quick research says cranberries were shipped to Europe in the 1820s. So maybe some of them they made it to England. They talk a bit about them here. http://www.history.org/foundation/journal/holiday06/cran.cfm Interesting stuff.
Toggle Commented Oct 5, 2017 on Meeting new fruits at Word Wenches
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“What did my Georgian and Regency heroine encounter as new and exciting fruit as she went about her adventures?” Kiwis and avocados hadn’t arrived in her world. Apples and apricots and even dates were known from Roman times and before. I thought of two possibles. Bananas. (Did you know bananas are technically a berry. That’s the kind of little fact that’s likely to get you excluded from the company of all right-minded people if you go about pointing it out.) Bananas spread from southeast Asia to the Middle East and Africa and around the warmer lands of the Mediterranean, making everybody happy as they went. The first written note of their arrived in England was a recorded sale in 1633. Continue reading
Posted Oct 3, 2017 at Word Wenches
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Those are just lovely outfits. *sigh* Not practical for the way I live and I'm never going to go anywhere I could wear such things ... but they are most beautiful The fabric alone must be a pleasure to handle.
Toggle Commented Sep 24, 2017 on The Dior Exhibition at Word Wenches
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I'm going to agree that an epipen might be a good precaution if somebody's had a bad reaction in the past. One of those times to visit a doctor ... and I don't send folks in such direction often. My mom was another of the baking soda people. In fact, she used a paste of baking soda for all kinds of bites. Sunburn too. I don't know if it did any good, but it was nice and cool and soothing.
Toggle Commented Sep 23, 2017 on If I be waspish at Word Wenches
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Taming of the Shrew is a play that lends itself to broad comedy -- I wouldn't be at all surprised if that were the way it was originally played. This looks like a lovely production and they are both prodigiously athletic.
Toggle Commented Sep 23, 2017 on If I be waspish at Word Wenches
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THAT is bravery above and beyond the call of duty, y'know. I hope he looks in to the need for an epipen if it's at all likely he might need one. Better to be over prepared than under ...
Toggle Commented Sep 23, 2017 on If I be waspish at Word Wenches
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When a cure -- a folk lore cure certainly and maybe modern medical super cures too -- is complex and complicated and full of expensive ingredients, I always figure half the relief is keeping the poor stingee busy and distracted.
Toggle Commented Sep 20, 2017 on If I be waspish at Word Wenches
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Heck (jo says helpfully) if benadryl is an answer one can go around recommending it much cheaper than the emergency vet. What have become of all the home remedies, I wonder. Do we get stung less? Are we less inventive with lemon juice or coconut oil?
Toggle Commented Sep 20, 2017 on If I be waspish at Word Wenches
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If one gets swelling from wasps one might get serious swelling next time. Or swelling from something similar. Yes. Worth checking out. Aspertame huh? I suppose there's no no reason why it shouldn't penetrate through the skin. I wonder if a topical anesthetic would work. I wonder if that's what cold on the sting does... numbs everything.
Toggle Commented Sep 20, 2017 on If I be waspish at Word Wenches
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Interesting that after two centuries they still recommend ice on the wound. I would never have thought of ice myself. I have to admit I'm a bit skeptical of stuff you rub on the bite. I darkly suspect it's all cider vinegar or cologne or melted amber.
Toggle Commented Sep 20, 2017 on If I be waspish at Word Wenches
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How very clever you were to scrape your words together like that. You were very creative. I haven't been stung for many years. (crosses fingers) Histamine, huh? I will keep that in mind.
Toggle Commented Sep 20, 2017 on If I be waspish at Word Wenches
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I'm wholly in favor of bees. They do such good work and my sister keeps bees, which gives me a proprietorial interest. I will have to plant some butterfly bushes and see if I can get more of them on site
Toggle Commented Sep 20, 2017 on If I be waspish at Word Wenches
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Various kinds of oil, honey, ammonia, spirit of wine, and several other reputed specifics, appear to deserve no such character, since they are found, after unprejudiced trials, to have no power of neutralizing the venom, nor of appeasing the actual pain arising from the sting. ... [The best treatment is] The part is afterwards to be covered with snow, or bathed with ice-cold water, or some cooling sedative lotion. In short, the case is to be treated on common antiphlogistic principles, experience having fully proved that no specific has yet been discovered for the sting of the bee, and other venomous insects Continue reading
Posted Sep 19, 2017 at Word Wenches
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We see the photos or prints or paintings of old old fashions, but what we don't see is the way of wearing them. So much lost when we can't see the clothing as it is meant to be seen -- in motion.
Toggle Commented Sep 8, 2017 on The shawl of beauty and grace at Word Wenches
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I will join you in questioning the bona fides of the "genuine casheme" or "real silk" anything bought from street vendors. I don't know if I put much more trust in some of the labels I see in stores ...
Toggle Commented Sep 8, 2017 on The shawl of beauty and grace at Word Wenches
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All my friends seem to be wearing these infinity scarves. Very pretty. And they do look warm.
Toggle Commented Sep 8, 2017 on The shawl of beauty and grace at Word Wenches
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