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Joanne Bourne
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Hi LynS -- I don't know if I can call it a 'craft', but I rather enjoy making pots. I guess some of us never outgrow the desire to play in the mud. I'm pretty sure Regency ladies didn't 'pot' -- though I think they painted china and sent it back to the factory for the last firing. Quilting is another of those crafts that appeals to me that has rather slipped off the list of possibilities. Had I but world enough and time ... Thank you for the kind words about the writing. I do so enjoy it. I suppose it's my 'craft'.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Crafty Skills and Writing Thrills at Word Wenches
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I am so envious of folks who are deeply moved by music and make it part of their lives. And I've seen some wonderful books where music leads the hero and heroine together. That said, I'm about totally unmusical myself. I'm not even 'singing in the shower' qualified. I'm afraid my book folks tend to follow in my footsteps. One of my heroines, Annique from Spymaster's Lady, has not been trained in music. Her musical grandfather attempts to remedy this, without much success.
Toggle Commented Jun 17, 2015 on Crafty Skills and Writing Thrills at Word Wenches
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Yes. This is what I love -- seeing how a writer's life interesects with their writer's craft.
Toggle Commented Jun 17, 2015 on Crafty Skills and Writing Thrills at Word Wenches
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I think the period equivalent of creating a digital photo album would be drawing. Catching the likeness of a face or building or landscape and keeping that forever as a memento would have been just as satisfying and taking photographs today. We underestimate the skill these Regency people brought to their art, and yet we see it again and again when we get access to old sketching books and watercolors. My character Pax in Rogue Spy was an accomplished artist. He uses it for his spying ... *g* I had to ask friends what it was like to create visual arts since I do not have this skill myself.
Toggle Commented Jun 17, 2015 on Crafty Skills and Writing Thrills at Word Wenches
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Now I had not even thought about decoupage. What a lovely hobby and how symbolic of healing and making. A good handicraft for a character, I think.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2015 on Crafty Skills and Writing Thrills at Word Wenches
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Ah ... autocorrect. The enemy of writers everywhere.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2015 on Crafty Skills and Writing Thrills at Word Wenches
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Do you think you might be able to put your characters into the kitchen for some special rare activity. Maybe a Christmas pudding they make with a recipe very different than that used by their husband's family? Maybe a special sort of cake they simply enjoy making and are support enough and original enough to insist on doing so?
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2015 on Crafty Skills and Writing Thrills at Word Wenches
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The thing about writing fiction is that you can indeed keep doing it at any point in your life. I think older folks bring special knowledge and a lovely point of view to their work.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2015 on Crafty Skills and Writing Thrills at Word Wenches
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It's as if you combine all the arts and crafts of the Wenches. A little of this. A little of that. I am so sorry to hear about the rotator cuff. I know other people this happened to. It just seems as if the body is poorly designed when things like go on.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2015 on Crafty Skills and Writing Thrills at Word Wenches
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I should do that. Not so much an etsy shop, but maybe I could give them my ceramic pots away to readers ... I think it would be so cool to have a Ukrainian grandmother and carry on a family tradition of fine embroidery.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2015 on Crafty Skills and Writing Thrills at Word Wenches
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Alas, I am not crafty, except perhaps in my plotting. I learned basic sewing as a girl and made some of my own clothes because that's what girls did in that time and place, but I wasn't enthusiastic about it, and I was a complete loss at handcrafts. I botched cross-stitch and never mastered crochet and had zero interest in embroidery. I did learn to knit in college because it was a way to keep hands busy when we sat around and talked, and I even managed a few large needle sweaters. But they weren't very good except for basic warmth, and I haven't knit since I got out of college. Continue reading
Posted Jun 14, 2015 at Word Wenches
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It's really a walk down Memory Lane, isn't it. I have to admit I haven't read all of these first books myself. Now that they're more and more likely to be available in e-version, I will. It'd be interesting to read the first book and then go directly to the most recent release. See if I could recognize both as the work of the same author.
Toggle Commented May 23, 2015 on The ninth, part deux! at Word Wenches
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Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland -- me too. I loved all those Regency books. I'd read 'em by the armload.
Toggle Commented May 23, 2015 on The ninth, part deux! at Word Wenches
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Several of the Wenches have reprints just out or coming up. It's so wonderful for me. Some of those older books are long lost friends.
Toggle Commented May 23, 2015 on The ninth, part deux! at Word Wenches
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I have to say that the virtual ... cake? ... looks lovely. What kind is it? And does it go with Veuve Clicquot?
Toggle Commented May 20, 2015 on Happy Ninth Anniversary to Us! at Word Wenches
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I have to admit it's hard for me to read a Historical Romance that is just plain inaccurate. I'm fine with a book that doesn't give much historical detail. I'm okay with the occasional book that has its characters acting in a very modern way. But when it comes to the equivalent of the hero reaching for a can of beer, I just get kicked out of the story. That's very *sigh* for me because I WANT the book in my hand to be good. I am on the author's side in all this. Thank goodness there are a lot of good books out there.
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Thank you for the kinds words. (jo wriggles like a puppy, which is something better mentioned in words than observed in real life, perhaps.) I'm going to second your praise of JAK, (and Sherry Thomas and Mary Jo.) JAK and Nora Roberts bring me great joy. I open the book and hang my worries and pains at the doorway and enter a world where I do not have to think. The skill that goes into creating these stories just awes me.
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Oh thank you so much. (jo brightens up and feels as if she's been given an extra cup of expresso, just reading that.) You'll notice I didn't contribute to that wonderful blog up top. I kept reading the other wenches entries and thinking about it and being quite unable to make a good and useful contribution. The best I can say is that some writers bring me joy by being historically accurate and realistic and thoughtful. Some bring me joy by writing bright dialog and tossing me around in their persiflage and making me laugh. Give me good writing, you author folks, and I will follow you anywhere.
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Oh, thank you. Y'know ... my editor doesn't very often ask for a re-write. But she looked at my (perfectly adequate) original scene and sent it back saying, "Hawker needs better than this." So that scene's a second go. *g*
Toggle Commented May 11, 2015 on Is X-Rated Over-Rated? at Word Wenches
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I'm enjoying the thought of ye olde period toothpick twigs. I'm quite certain there were favored species. I can see a medieval goodwife laying in a store for the winter.
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That is such a fine, touching story. (But I suspect your dad might have found something else to strike up his conversation. He sounds like a determined man. I have always wondered why we use toothpaste that tastes sweet. I mean, doesn't that leave sugar on the teeth to do its dread work of decay? So maybe your dentist had something there.
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I think the traditional reason for the 'acid?' rinse was to get the last of the soap out of the hair back in the days when folks did you soap rather than detergents and lauryl stearate. If so, vinegar would work, or lemon, or -- this has always struck me as so odd -- beer. And if one must smell of any of those three, let it be lemon.
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Candied ginger is just the sovereign remedy against nausea. (Tastes good too.) I've had ginger ale recommended but it doesn't seem to work as well for me somehow.
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I'm with you on the cleaning products. The final quick wipe of the wood floor is dilute vinegar. I like the way it cuts through all the pollens we have up here. I, too, try to buy artisan soap. It's lovely stuff and I want to encourage the crafts. Etsy has a fine selection.
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Hi Jenny -- I don't think it can ever have been exactly genteel to pick your teeth in company. *g* I have one of my characters (Doyle) carry an ivory tooth in a little case and use it when he wants to look particularly vulgar. But private use ... I will venture to say it was probably pretty universal. Just not so much mentioned.
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