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Joanne Bourne
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Eagle of the Ninth and Warrior Scarlet. I wish I could write like that.
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That's the only one of hers I ever read. I saw a stage performance of it, too. A college group. Interesting.
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Whenever I wonder if covers sell books, I think about those Newbury and Caldecott Medals on the cover that made me pick them out at once. I wish they did that with YA and adult books. There are awards of all kinds and they never seem to be shown off. Pity, I think.
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I loved Sutcliff. She was the beginning of a lifelong love of the Classics. Decline and Fall, Renault, I Claudius (on TV too!) and all the translations of Homer and the Greek dramas. She made my life so much richer.
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I had forgotten about the bookmobile. I do remember it coming to the end of the street and me going to it on my own when I was seven or eight. Maybe younger. I had to climb WAY up to get on that step. They let us take just stacks of books out. Really, so many. Admirable of them. I am a huge fan of libraries. And cereal boxes are a greatly underappreciated form of literature.
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I never thought about the covers that way, but you're right. The Pokey Little Puppy would not be The Pokey Little Puppy without that cover. The Velveteen Rabbit, likewise. And while it's not one of MY childhood books, but one of my kids', Good Night Moon wouldn't be the same. I really hate the GNM cover, but it is so much part of the experience.
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I found Cooper held up pretty well to rereading -- which is to say, the problems I saw in it in Middle Grade are still there. The too-powerful, too-omniscient protagonist.
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Interestingly enough, when I read Girl of the Limberlost as a full grown adult i did not, of course, come to it as a young girl would have, but as a writer. The main character is just an absolutely pure quill account of someone completely honest, full of integrity, straightforward. A case study of it, if you will. That's how you write it.
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I read SOOOO many books of fairy tales and myths. Greek myths, Moldavian myths, The Red, Green, Blue and who knows how many other fairy books. Alice in Wonderland -- now that I read at a bunch of different ages and it was a different book every time I read it.
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Kindle. I don't know how I travelled in the days before kindle. I vaguely remember using have the suitcase for books and huffing and puffing out the door with them.
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I read the little house books ... but I don't think it was anywhere near when they first came out.Or, at least, I didn't think of them as newly issued books. Nobody at the library every discouraged me from reading in any section. I think my formidable mother would have put a quick stop to that. And there was all sort of questionable books on the shelves at home, but my mother said, (I remember her saying this,) "If she knows what it's about it's too late to keep her ignorant. If she doesn't, she'll just be bored." I do remember that my mother and father talked seriously about whether they should put the gory and graphically illustrated medical books away someplace the kids wouldn't see them. I think they decided kids were gruesome folks anyway and wouldn't come to much harm from anatomical textbooks.
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I didn't read Amelia Bedelia myself as a kid, but I read it to MY kids. One loved it. One was politely puzzled. Winnie the Pooh as another I didn't read quite young enough to enjoy it as it was meant tob e enjoyed.
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I think we're the last generation where the average person held beautifully bound books in hand. For me, that was poetry books. My mother loved poetry and had a vast collection of 1920s and 30s volumes. While I read the classic children's animal books like Black Beauty and Bambi and Call of the Wild, I wasn't a big horsebook person. I knida missed that ...
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I gotta agree. There is nothing like going down the aisle and pulling out books to glance into. Nothing online is the same.
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Half Magic is here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006WQL050/wordwench-20 I'd add Susan Cooper to this.
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I did a lot of SF reading, right down to nine and ten years old. I missed the Hugh Walters books though. I was very very lucky. I had three older sisters, all great readers, and my mother not only read lots of books, but seems to have kept them all. I had a huge library to choose from. My father was not a great fiction reader but he read lots of history. I mostly got into that when I was much older. Gengis Khan, Tamerlane, Roman Egypt, the Kingdoms of Africa, Decline and Fall ... it was all there waiting for me when I got into my teens. And he read to us when he got home from work. Little kid books. But often enough, books for my older sisters, so I got to hear it all.
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What kind of reader was I? In a word? Insatiable — and I still am now. By day I was happy to be out and about, playing and exploring with my dog, but come night-time it was essential to my happiness that I always have something to read. Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Word Wenches
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Now I picture some time-travelling Medieval troubadour, visiting the mid-Twentieth Century, looking through B&N for his collected works, puzzled by the literary company he finds himself among. Victorian erotica is different from C18 and Regency Erotica in both content and the attitude toward it. Fascinating stuff for students of historical literature. Well. For students of literature today, too. All part of the human condition.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2018 on Erotic Books of the Regency at Word Wenches
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And it tells us so much about the young heroine. Obviously she will turn out to be a Force To Be Reckoned With someday.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2018 on Erotic Books of the Regency at Word Wenches
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*g* So true. So true. I see a couple of skin-clad Cro Magnon kids sneaking into some prehistorical cave niche full of fertility statues. "Wow," says one. "People don't really look like that," says the other. "Impressive, anyway."
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2018 on Erotic Books of the Regency at Word Wenches
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I'm always appalled and amused by American efforts to protect the purity and innocence of fourteen- and fifteen-year-olds. It does indicate the innocence of the fifty-year-olds who are doing this.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2018 on Erotic Books of the Regency at Word Wenches
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For some reason, the links in this posting aren't working for everyone. I don't know why. This link may lead to a cached version. Try copying this URL into the search box of your search engine. http://patrickspedding.blogspot.com/2009/07/18ce-texts-online.html%20
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2018 on Erotic Books of the Regency at Word Wenches
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At the link, they call Carl Sesar's translation "playful". That describes it so well. It gives the "feel" of the original. So Catullus "broke" Google translate. That makes me smile.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2018 on Erotic Books of the Regency at Word Wenches
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A writer wants to create a fully formed character. Curiosity, maybe a bit of rebellion, daring -- these are all inside the heroines who explore this subject in 1811. We can use a little book, quickly hidden, to show a lot about the new young wife.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2018 on Erotic Books of the Regency at Word Wenches
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One big difference between "naughty" historical books and naughty books of 2018 is that we seem to have a lot more variety. *g* Looking at this tells us so much about how different the Regency was ... and how similar.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2018 on Erotic Books of the Regency at Word Wenches
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