This is Joanne Bourne's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Joanne Bourne's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Joanne Bourne
Recent Activity
Image
A certain Francis Smith determined to watch for and confront the ghost. He waited in hiding in Blacklion Lane. It “was very dark at all times, being between hedges; and on that evening it was so very obscure, that a person on one side of the road could not distinguish an object on the other.” He saw a figure all in white approach. He called out “Damn you, who are you, and what are you? I'll shoot you, if you don't speak.” But the figure continued to advance towards him. This “augmented his fear so much that he fired.” Continue reading
Posted Sep 9, 2016 at Word Wenches
18
Image
We're going straight to the hard, permanent, waterproof stuff laid down on city walkways and roadways to distinguish them from the endless tracks of dirt and muddy ruts with which the countryside was plentifully supplied. Were there dirt roadways in the city of London? Some, probably. Dirt roadways approached the edges of the city, of course. I imagine one of the welcome signs of arriving in London was the rumble and clack of London roads under wheel or hoof. The banks of the Thames were unpaved and frankly mucky I should think and travelled by foot and the odd wagon. It's likely that some of the smallest alleys in the rookeries were essentially drainage swales washed out by the downpours and unpaved. Continue reading
Posted Aug 18, 2016 at Word Wenches
37
I remember at college we did the same thing. One of us was left-handed and she was always relegate to the corner seat. She accepted it philosophically.
Toggle Commented Jul 19, 2016 on The Story of a Fork at Word Wenches
1 reply
Image
The 1700s, in fact, were a period of considerable forment and experimentation in tableware. Two great changes had come about. First, table knives were no longer the instrument of potential mayhem that had delighted small fry. In 1669 King Louis XIV — who doubtless had his reasons — ordered all table knives must have blunt tips. This was a game changer. Since they could no longer double as a weapon, the new rounded table knives became broad and flat. They became, in short, useful for eating from. Continue reading
Posted Jul 18, 2016 at Word Wenches
47
That's very much the way I feel. Some fine books are just not for me, at least not this minute. I put them back on my shelf and resolve to try again in a month or a year. When I go out of my way to mention a book in WWR, it's been special to me. Some months I have to throw up my hands for WWR and say -- "I've been so busy I haven't read Anything At All!" Or "I kept trying books and couldn't settle down into anything." (Thought that's nearly always my fault when you come right down to it.) I have not read the Lee Child's Jack Reacher books but I am resolved to do so as soon as I have a free minute. I get so many reccs for them and now one from you ...
Toggle Commented Jun 29, 2016 on What We're Reading in June at Word Wenches
1 reply
Caryn Moya Block's Siberian Volkov Pack I will keep an eye out for those. I'm always looking for a good shape shifter romance.
Toggle Commented Jun 29, 2016 on What We're Reading in June at Word Wenches
1 reply
I admire Joan Smith for her tight, skilled writing. A great stylist. I started admiring her way back in the good old high days of Regency Romance. Berkley seems to have released some of her titles as mysteries.
Toggle Commented Jun 29, 2016 on What We're Reading in June at Word Wenches
1 reply
Australia ... Regency Romance / rock stars. No predicting. I had not heard of the Louise Allen book. I see she won the RoNA Rose Award 2015 Love Madeline Hunter. She's written some of my all time favorite Medievals.
Toggle Commented Jun 29, 2016 on What We're Reading in June at Word Wenches
1 reply
Hah. Interesting setting. (Okay. I've been watching Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries so I am in the mood for all things historical Australia.)
Toggle Commented Jun 29, 2016 on What We're Reading in June at Word Wenches
1 reply
I'm a big fan of JAK myself. Comforting reads, wonderful to slip into when my mind is busy and I can't concentrate. I haven't read much Western Romance. Elizabeth Lowell has been a great pleasure to me. The MacKenzie/Blackthorn books are the ones I remember best.
Toggle Commented Jun 29, 2016 on What We're Reading in June at Word Wenches
1 reply
Image
When I'm deep into writing a new book, I often reread comfort books because I know I'll enjoy them and there isn't the stress of hunting down new books and maybe not finding something I like. So--currently rereading Jayne Ann Krentz romantic suspense novels. I love her Arcane series, where characters have paranormal, psychic type abilities that are both blessing and curse. WHITE LIES is a particular favorite, where the heroine can always tell if someone is lying. This is a decidedly mixed blessing. Continue reading
Posted Jun 28, 2016 at Word Wenches
36
What Mary Jo said. I had not known or, more likely, I had forgotten that it was coming out in mass market.) Last Chance Christmas Ball with My True Love Hath My Heart is at https://www.amazon.com/Last-Chance-Christmas-Ball-ebook/dp/B00RRT32HU?ie=UTF8&btkr=1&redirect=true&ref_=dp-kindle-redirect Gambled Away with Gideon and the Den of Thieves is at https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=gambled+away
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2016 on Interview with Jeannie Lin at Word Wenches
1 reply
Yes! That idea of moving the whole story to a new place and time has been very well done. I like it when this happens to stories I love. In a general way, this moving a whole cast of characters to a new place is intriguing. One could take the cast there and set them to telling a new story. Maybe I'll get to do that someday.
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2016 on Interview with Jeannie Lin at Word Wenches
1 reply
Oh Faith, This is so much My Bad. I didn't think to give the title of the anthology, (The Last Chance Christmas Ball) and a buy link. I added buy links to Everything, and forgot that one. Definitely try her novella in Gambled Away. You may well find yourself fascinated by her hero and heroine. They continue their story elsewhere.
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2016 on Interview with Jeannie Lin at Word Wenches
1 reply
This story was so much fun to write. It's kind of a villain-centric story.
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2016 on Interview with Jeannie Lin at Word Wenches
1 reply
*g* Novellas are a whole nother way of writing. I'm just learning to appreciate them. When Jeannie does it, she creates a whole rich setting from hundreds of little details.
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2016 on Interview with Jeannie Lin at Word Wenches
1 reply
I get to talk about a story I love and characters I love. I get to do it with their creator. Fangirl moment. Jeannie writes such intelligent, delicate stories.
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2016 on Interview with Jeannie Lin at Word Wenches
1 reply
Oh, that's a lovely idea. I can see Will Scarlet demanding 'just the right fit' to his jacket on Jermyn Street and Maid Marion picking out a fashionable hat.
Toggle Commented May 31, 2016 on Interview with Jeannie Lin at Word Wenches
1 reply
Image
King_of_hearts_fr.svg Joanna here. GambledAway-hires I’m interviewing Jeannie Lin, writer of most excellent Historical Romances set in Tang Dynasty China and Steampunk set in an alternate but formidably realistic historical China. She writes love, adventure, complicated family relationship, and high stakes in a world that sets all our assumptions wobbling. These are not your everyday Romances, folks. Continue reading
Posted May 30, 2016 at Word Wenches
16
That puts it in words for me. Somehow I thought she'd go on forever.
Toggle Commented May 26, 2016 on In Memoriam: Jo Beverley at Word Wenches
1 reply
That's a lovely story. I am so glad to have heard it. Thank you.
Toggle Commented May 26, 2016 on In Memoriam: Jo Beverley at Word Wenches
1 reply
We just say what we can. Even a few words help. Just saying we'll miss her and that we respected and liked her is a memorial. There's an old custom. It's a Jewish custom, but it's probably shared by many peoples. When you visit someone's grave you bring a little stone with you and leave it on the grave. That's what I figure my words are. One stone to put with the others.
Toggle Commented May 26, 2016 on In Memoriam: Jo Beverley at Word Wenches
1 reply
I was watching Mary Beard on Youtube giving a lecture on the history of the Roman Empire. I was reminded of Jo for some reason. And it came to me that Jo was another of these remarkable women -- intelligent, principled, authentic -- who cut through the cackle and tweep and keep us all centered. A privilege to know her. I'm a better person for it.
Toggle Commented May 26, 2016 on In Memoriam: Jo Beverley at Word Wenches
1 reply
My place is pretty small, so I hang only one picture, mostly. One thing an old friend taught me was, you don't have to hang all the art all the time. She'd put up a strong nail and change her artwork every couple months. Kept the collection carefully in a box in the bottom of the closet.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2016 on Buy that art! at Word Wenches
1 reply
Now the idea of 'artist's agents' or entrepreneurs in art in Regency times is an intriguing one. I haven't come across examples of this -- but it is so very much not my field of expertise, I wouldn't necessarily have seen it. The Farington Diary by Joseph Farington, RA, is available in print. I have a copy but have done no more than leaf through it since I've never written about a circle of artists. Farington knew a lot of artists and might talk about the business of selling art. I dunnoh.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2016 on Buy that art! at Word Wenches
1 reply