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Joanne Bourne
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(jo waves) Another Wellman fan. I am so glad to see so many of his stories online. Apparently the publisher is doing this. Yeah, Baen!
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on What We're Reading at Word Wenches
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I'm with on cushions. I toss myself into big comfy chairs and then stuff cushions around me. It works. And I squirm around a lot.
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The Adirondack chairs are so unwieldy and odd looking -- but somehow they 'work' visually. They're almost alien in their weird. As if creatures from Mars should be sitting in them.
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This is so funny, especially the part about painting them red. I envy you your skills in repair, rebuild and refurbish. I try to do stuff like this but I usually muck it up.
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And good on you for knowing what was important to them and taking it seriously and seeing that they got what they needed. And you used to run a pub in London! Now I wish I was writing in 'vintage era' and could mine your memories for the old stories.
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No chair is more useful and honored than the one that holds kids being read to. I remember my father used to come home from a long day at work and sit down in his chair with a kid tucked on either side of him and one sitting on the arm and maybe the other two leaning over the back ... and read us stories. How could someone NOT grow up loving books when there is an 'Oma' to read them in the big comfy chair?
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I love wingback chairs. I am currently without one at the moment, but this does not lessen my love for them. They are so stately and historical. Also, I heat with a woodstove, so the wingback catches ALL the heat and protects me from drafts sneaking up from behind. That may even be their original purpose. Your view sounds lovely.
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That's kinda the way I feel. A teak Adirondack chair would be just lovely. Would be nostalgic and genuine. Would be a pleasure to interact with, all warm from the sun and smooth under the hand. But I have got to the stage of life where I see something that heavy and think it over and decide that, no, on the whole, I am not going to try to move it. The Sky Chairs http://www.skychairs.com/chair.php at first glance look like they'd be hard for someone of my stately and deliberate body type to get into and out of. I might maybe do somewhat better with something like http://cdn.homedit.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/hanging-papasan-double-size-porch.jpg But I may just be doomed to chairs that stay firmly in place while I try to get in and out of them.
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My goal in writing stuff here is to make folks walk away feeling happy. If I make folks smile just a little, I've done my job. And I have to say there is something innately ludicrous about Adirondack chairs. I am quite sure they do not take themselves seriously.
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I very, very slightly understand what you mean about being challenged. I have served my time as a pregnant person, eyeing every seating possibility with the question, "Will I be able to extricate myself from that?" I never buy a chair without sitting in it and getting up and sitting in it and getting up ... Some of my favorites are 'inherited chairs'. For some reason the last generation had furniture that fits me better.
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I've been wondering about how well wooden lawn furniture would hold up in a damp, hot climate in the south. There are Reasons the Victorians went with painted wrought iron for their benches and tables. I don't know what plastic lumber is, but I envy you your mad handiperson skills that you are able to build your stuff.
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Hammock Chair !!! That sounds way cool. Now I want a hammock chair too.
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The Adirondacks are a mountain chain in upstate New York. Back at the end of the Nineteenth Century fashionable city dwellers in New York and Boston used to take the train to that neck of the woods and spend the hottest parts of the summer in the mountains. Fashionable outdoor furniture of a somewhat rustic nature was called for. The Adirondack chair became a classic. Continue reading
Posted Aug 25, 2015 at Word Wenches
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It does seem unfair someone so musical should have an I-won't-dance husband. I envy you your delight in music. Folks who can lose themselves in music and dance almost have a special 'sense' added to the normal five.
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I feel the same way. I dance in my kitchen. I hum and wriggle across the back porch to music I play in my head. I love watching the dance, I don't have to be able to do it well myself, thank Goodness.
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And why shouldn't you like hip hop. It's the wild dance of the times. It's our own contribution to the history of dance. Hip hop and break dancing. Exuberant. Handsome. Exciting. Lovely stuff
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There's something delightfully feminine about dancing. I wish I got to do more of it. Feeling 'Like a Princess' is exactly right. One does.
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I'm headed out to RWA National in a few days. There's a miniconference first -- put on by the special chapter for Regency writers -- and a ball that gives the re-enactors a chance to do period dances. I am so looking forward to that.
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I love Lucy Worsley. I have a playlist at Youtube with lots of documentaries about the Georgian and Regency period. A good many of them are hers. I didn't review that video for this posting, but I'll go back and see it now.
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Rather nice to think of old biddies standing on the sideline, disapproving.i
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Sad to lose that particular great pleasure. And square dancing clubs are as much about socializing as the dancing. For me, blogging about things I can no longer do and places I can no longer go is a great pleasure. Not full compensation, of course. But something.
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A fine thing to have on one's bucket list. It's the sort of stuff one might actually do. And enjoy. And continue enjoying. Tahiti (on mine) seems less likely.
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Wow. That reminds me so much of the jitterbug -- but fancier. Lively and lovely.
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I will have to go find some videos of that. I haven't seen it that I remember and it sounds lovely. (Who knows. Maybe some writing friend will add a dance scene to one of their Scottish historicals.)
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Those TV programs are raising a whole generation of watchers who can now catch some of the fine points of the dancing arts. All kinds of dance. We are richer for the education.
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