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Joanne Bourne
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I especially loved the combination of realism and magic, everyday life and fantasy. All blended so seamlessly. Just a beautiful book, Named of the Dragon.
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I'm glad you had a chance to read Spymaster's Lady and so pleased that you enjoyed it. Patricia Briggs and Jennifer Ashley are wonderful company to be in. The best.
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Aaaawww. That is so warm-hearted and insightful. Nothing could mean more than something you make with your own hands.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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You confirm something I have long suspected. Marketers send different stuff to the US. I won't say they pawn off the lesser, inferior stuff there ....
Toggle Commented Apr 23, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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Yep. And the evaporated milk is -- so far as I know -- perfectly authentic. It's one of the options used in the Middle East for chai. I even like evaporated milk in coffee. That's the way they drink it in the back woods in Maine where you can't get out to buy fresh milk. And the way one drinks it in Africa where fresh milk is a great luxury and often unavailable. I much prefer evaporated milk to those strange little creamers. (Hey. That's just me. Other folks appreciate the special flavors.)
Toggle Commented Apr 23, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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There's nothing, really, like milk in tea or coffee. The substitutes are not the same. If I can't get milk, I'd rather drink tea or coffee black than use soymilk of the artificial creamers. I'm lucky in that I don't mind drinking it black. Lucky also in the variety and excellence of herb teas these days. I like my herb teas in delicate little china cups, rather than the hand-thrown pottery I generally use. I make some of those cups myself. My favorite herbal is simple peppermint. I don't think I've ever had nettle tea. I understand it's supposed to be good for you.
Toggle Commented Apr 22, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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It's the tea bag that rang the death knell for good tea. A teabag makes usable the broken bits, the veritable crumblings, even the dust, of tea. They contain lord knows what mixture. I'm careful what sort of tea bags I buy and much prefer the loose tea.
Toggle Commented Apr 21, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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There seem to be many shapes and patterns to the Victorian 'flow ware' teapots, all of them quite lovely. The handleless cups would seem to say this is an old set indeed. Your 'iced tea' sounds quite lovely. I live in the South and we are inventive with out teas. Oddly, our Regency folks never seem to have invented iced tea, or cooled tea, or tea-with-ale ...
Toggle Commented Apr 21, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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Oh my. That's a lovely teapot. So jaunty and such an organic shape. How wonderful to pass the 'tea knowledge' on to a next generation. I have a knitted tea cozy for my pot and I feel quite cherishing and protective when I settle it over the brewing tea.
Toggle Commented Apr 21, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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I'm so happy you'll be getting this teapot that you want and that it will be part of such a happy time. The 'cream in tea puzzles' me as well. I mean -- it wouldn't even taste good, leaving aside British custom. Milk (at room temperature) in tea. Or, like, yak butter. Some of it may be American coffee drinkers, well meaning but ignorant. But I wonder. Could this possibly come from folks who have heard of 'cream teas'? A cream tea, for those to whom this is not everyday terminology, is (where would we be without wikipedia) "a form of afternoon ... light meal, consisting of tea taken with a combination of scones, clotted cream, and jam."
Toggle Commented Apr 21, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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I make all kinds of mistakes and I never catch them. I figure a foolish obsession with typos is the hobgoblin of little minds. Or something
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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Yes. Yes. Delicate china cup. I haz 'em. I have all kindsa different cups, one for each mood (and one that the kids made for me that is lopsided.) I will keep what you say about scones in mind. I had almost sorta known this in the back of my mind but I had not focused on the knowledge. Thank you.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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The sugar bowl is huge (I think) for a couple reasons. Sugar was expensive, so it was a display of your prosperity and a kind offering of something special to the guests. Sugar lumps were large and the sugar was less refined. My Aunt used to serve what they now call turbinado sugar but which she called brown sugar -- though it wasn't like the brown sugar I had at home, an early lesson in cultural awareness. Sugar lumps were not uniform. There'd be big ones and small ones and lopsided funny-looking ones. The big bowl let you make a considered and lengthy choice in this important aspect of the tea drinking. I've never been to The Homestead which is not all that distant. Perhaps someday.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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Some of the difference in taste may be an actual difference in the tea. I suspect even the British tea companies use different blends for the United States, under the impression that we like ... I dunnoh ... different. The best tea I ever bought was in Hungary. Lovely black tea. My local coffee shop sells tea on the side. I was teaching the barista how to warm the tea pot. I am an emissary from tea land.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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That's a cool idea. Even if you heat water with a coffee maker and put tea bags in the cup it's still worth the extra minute or two to pull a beautiful object from the cabinet and enjoy it. Makes the tea taste better, jo maintains stoutly.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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There are some places one can go OUT to tea and have it served at a table with a cloth and fine china. They generally provide a choice of masses of pastries and other treats. Special treat for me when I visit family sometimes.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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I didn't realize Royal Doulton was gone. Heck. It dates to 1815, so I can't generally use it in my own writing, but anyone who moves into the Victorian era as a good, solid table detail. I tend to fall back on Sèvres since the manufactury long predates the Regency. I enjoy the process of making tea, but, like you, I may not have time for it. I have my teabags ready.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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I am so glad you had that time with your great aunt. And the Irish tea time sounds just right. I haven't spent much time in Ireland but I loved the time I was there. It included the wonderful teas in tea shops or in people's houses. Great bread and butter. Very fine (strong) tea.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2016 on The Ritual of Tea ... at Word Wenches
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One of the great ceremonies of Regency life, one that defined gentility, was the taking of tea. The Regency is sorta midway in the story of tea in England. We’re past the Seventeenth and early Eighteenth Century with its careful, stingy measuring of tea by the mistress of the household, the leaves locked up safe in a decorative caddy. We haven’t reached the Victorian era where tea was the daily drink of every working man and city housewife. Continue reading
Posted Apr 20, 2016 at Word Wenches
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“The ashes were carefully raked over the bed of coals on the hearth at night to preserve the fire. If we ‘lost fire’, we fell back on the tinder-box, and struck a steel ring with a flint till a spark fell on tinder when it was blown into a flame. Or, if the tinder-box was out of order, we went to a neighbor’s kitchen and begged a shovelful of coals.” Continue reading
Posted Mar 13, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Oh *grin*
Toggle Commented Feb 18, 2016 on Conflict And The Happy Ending at Word Wenches
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There are just beautiful love stories with scarred or damaged heroes. It's a powerful, healing sort of love we find in these books. So many dimensions of love here. The heroine being able to see the hidden value of the hero. The hero being able to accept his own self worth.
Toggle Commented Feb 17, 2016 on Conflict And The Happy Ending at Word Wenches
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>>>>That is anything involving pirates, spies, kidnapping or highwaymen.<<<< (joanna whimpers.) No spies? I will say that the adventure has to be secondary to the hero and heroine falling in love. That we have to be more interested in what's going on inside the protagonists than the gunfire. *g*
Toggle Commented Feb 17, 2016 on Conflict And The Happy Ending at Word Wenches
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We always bring so much of ourselves to the books we read. Do we look for ourselves in the heroine? Do we look for our beloveds in the hero? I know I get impatient with heroines who wring their hands and suffer instead of going out and solving the problem. For what it's worth, I LOVED the Power Puff girls. Such darlings!
Toggle Commented Feb 17, 2016 on Conflict And The Happy Ending at Word Wenches
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Anne -- Do you happen to recall the titles of the Hobb and Shinn books? Only if you have them handy on the tip of your tongue ... They sound like great reads.
Toggle Commented Feb 17, 2016 on Conflict And The Happy Ending at Word Wenches
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