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joffonon
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To each their own, but I personally wouldn't have said Wil's blog was particularly profane; it's not like every other word is a swear word. Anyway, sometimes only a colourful metaphor will do. :-)
Toggle Commented Jun 13, 2011 on all dressed up with nowhere to go at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
Does that apply to non-US copyright as well? :-) In any case, you could always tweet @steven_moffat and check he's cool with it...
Toggle Commented May 26, 2011 on My 2011 Phoenix Comicon Schedule at WWdN: In Exile
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Although in the UK itself, we have Remembrance Sunday on the Sunday before Armistice Day. In recent years both have been commemorated.
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No, the Enterprise computer was voiced by the late Majel Barrett-Roddenberry, just a fortnight or so before she died.
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Those of us who've had pets and lost them understand the pain. My condolences to you and your family.
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It's the crust. Anything else is wrong. End of discussion. :-)
Toggle Commented Aug 19, 2009 on the crust of the matter at innocent drinks
Like others, my wife and I had the pleasure of seeing Hamlet at the RSC last year - sitting not many feet away from the likes of Patrick Stewart, David Tennant and Oliver Ford Davies ("A communications disruption can mean only one thing - invasion." - The Phantom Menace. :-) ). It's in settings like that, that you appreciate how good they are as actors, and they are absolutely brilliant. This Friday we get to see not only Patrick Stewart, but also Sir Ian McKellen playing the leads in 'Waiting for Godot' - I hear the play is incomprehensible at times, but the chance to see these two on stage together is too good to miss. And any production that has acting greats Simon Callow and Ronald Pickup relegated to lower billing has to be a rarity.
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"or a good Premiere League matchup (that's real football, soccer to us Yanquis.)" Thumbs up for the 'real football comment. :-) A snort of mirth from this Brit, though, as a long-running football sketch* here in the UK jokingly referred to Americans calling a football match a 'matchup'. :-D Oh, and the pedant in me feels compelled to say "Premier League, not Premiere League". Sorry. *specifically, the Boston Goals sketch on 'Soccer AM' every Saturday morning (yes, we Brits jokingly refer to football as soccer too), the joke being that goals from a game featuring the English team Boston United (from Linconshire) were presented as though they were from Boston in the US. Loads of taking the mickey out of American sports commentary, a typical example being http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMgxF3dDZHw
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"or a good Premiere League matchup (that's real football, soccer to us Yanquis.)" Thumbs up for the 'real football comment. :-) A snort of mirth from this Brit, though, as a long-running football sketch* here in the UK jokingly referred to Americans calling a football match a 'matchup'. :-D Oh, and the pedant in me feels compelled to say "Premier League, not Premiere League". Sorry. *specifically, the Boston Goals sketch on 'Soccer AM' every Saturday morning (yes, we Brits jokingly refer to football as soccer too), the joke being that goals from a game featuring the English team Boston United (from Linconshire) were presented as though they were from Boston in the US. Loads of taking the mickey out of American sports commentary, a typical example being http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMgxF3dDZHw
1 reply
Oh, and finally: 9) You can watch the new series of Doctor Who without having watched the old. Unlike the infodump at the start of the Paul McGann TV movie, the makers of new Who very wisely pitched the resurrection of Who as something that old fans can enjoy and that new viewers won't be alienated by. Sure, there are mentions of places and aliens past for those who recognise these things, and some definite misty-eyed moments for old fans watching the return of Sarah Jane Smith and K-9 in 'School Reunion', but that's it. And depsite what some fans may think, it's clear there's a love of the show's past there in those that make it now. And we've just had Kylie Minogue as the companion in the Christmas Day special 'Voyage of the Damned', and who'd have thought *that* would ever happen?! Truly we live in wondrous times... :-)
Toggle Commented Jan 2, 2008 on genesis of the daleks at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
Oh, and finally: 9) You can watch the new series of Doctor Who without having watched the old. Unlike the infodump at the start of the Paul McGann TV movie, the makers of new Who very wisely pitched the resurrection of Who as something that old fans can enjoy and that new viewers won't be alienated by. Sure, there are mentions of places and aliens past for those who recognise these things, and some definite misty-eyed moments for old fans watching the return of Sarah Jane Smith and K-9 in 'School Reunion', but that's it. And depsite what some fans may think, it's clear there's a love of the show's past there in those that make it now. And we've just had Kylie Minogue as the companion in the Christmas Day special 'Voyage of the Damned', and who'd have thought *that* would ever happen?! Truly we live in wondrous times... :-)
Toggle Commented Jan 2, 2008 on genesis of the daleks at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
OK, so I'm late to the party here, and the original questions have been long-since answered. But as a Brit who has been in love with Doctor Who since he first watched early Tom Baker episodes in the mid-1970s, I can add (or in some cases endorse) the following: 1) Fans of Doctor Who (and no, there is no collective noun, just ones that people feel they have to create to label themselves) are quite capable of fandom feuds, the same as anything. The hate levelled at the show by its fans in the mid-to-late 1980s is comparable to the hate levelled at Wesley Crusher, and some of the "old school fan" hatred of new Doctor Who is just as bad. Personally I love new Who as much as I loved old Who, and the fact that - here in the UK - the TARDIS and Daleks and Cybermen and K-9 are all in the consciousness of children all over again, just as they were in my childhood, makes me go all misty-eyed. 2. Doctor Who fans do pedantry more than anything else. Hence anyone who types 'Davidson' instead of 'Davison' and 'Ecclestone' instead of 'Eccleston' is publicly corrected. It has to happen, it is the Law. 3. Similarly, the programme is always 'Doctor Who' and the character is 'The Doctor'. It doesn't matter that one story was mistakenly broadcast as 'Doctor Who and the Silurians' because of an admin error, or that the character was credited as 'Doctor Who' or 'Dr Who' for the first 18 years or so, fans ignore such things. :-) 4. 'City of Death' by (essentially) Douglas Adams is indeed one of the greatest stories of Doctor Who's run, where - apart from some typically-wobbly sets - everything just fell into place beautifully. 5. Robert Holmes was the greatest writer on old Doctor Who, and his work usually rises above the standards of the stories around it, so the period he was script editor is not surprisingly referred to as the 'Golden Age'. If you only ever watch one of his stories, the mid Tom Baker story 'The Talons of Weng-Chiang' positively drips in atmosphere. OK, it has the usual rubbish monster, but if you can see beyond the Gorn you can see beyond the giant rat. :-) Or, the Peter Davison swansong 'The Caves of Androzani', which - like all the best Doctor Who stories - has some fantastic cliffhangers. 6. Another truth among Doctor Who fans is that American fans remember their first showings in omnibus editions. As the DVDs show, the stories are episodic, and were shown one a week on a Saturday early-evening on first UK showing. Try enforcing a break between episodes wherever possible to re-create the "oh my God what happens next?!?" feeling that we UK fans remember and love. :-) 7. There is something worthy in even the worst of the programme's times. The 1980s may have been more of a pantomime at times, but every so often a jewel appeared. Colin Baker's period may have brought us 'The Twin Dilemma' with some god-awful acting, but then there was also 'Vengeance on Varos' which predicted trial by television-vote and had a fab monster. Sylvester McCoy may have started off as a spoon-playing clown, but soon became a much darker manipulator of those around him, and stories like 'Remembrance of the Daleks', 'Ghost Light' and especially 'The Curse of Fenric' show how Doctor Who could have developed had the BBC not axed it in 1989. 8. To get the full experience of 1970s Doctor Who, after any of the 1960s stories that are on DVD (if you want a bit of really-vintage TV), watch 'The Three Doctors' to get a sense of 'past Doctors', then skip to 'Robot' and carry on from there. Welcome to a whole new universe, where that strange blue box can go anywhere in time and space... :-)
Toggle Commented Jan 2, 2008 on genesis of the daleks at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
OK, so I'm late to the party here, and the original questions have been long-since answered. But as a Brit who has been in love with Doctor Who since he first watched early Tom Baker episodes in the mid-1970s, I can add (or in some cases endorse) the following: 1) Fans of Doctor Who (and no, there is no collective noun, just ones that people feel they have to create to label themselves) are quite capable of fandom feuds, the same as anything. The hate levelled at the show by its fans in the mid-to-late 1980s is comparable to the hate levelled at Wesley Crusher, and some of the "old school fan" hatred of new Doctor Who is just as bad. Personally I love new Who as much as I loved old Who, and the fact that - here in the UK - the TARDIS and Daleks and Cybermen and K-9 are all in the consciousness of children all over again, just as they were in my childhood, makes me go all misty-eyed. 2. Doctor Who fans do pedantry more than anything else. Hence anyone who types 'Davidson' instead of 'Davison' and 'Ecclestone' instead of 'Eccleston' is publicly corrected. It has to happen, it is the Law. 3. Similarly, the programme is always 'Doctor Who' and the character is 'The Doctor'. It doesn't matter that one story was mistakenly broadcast as 'Doctor Who and the Silurians' because of an admin error, or that the character was credited as 'Doctor Who' or 'Dr Who' for the first 18 years or so, fans ignore such things. :-) 4. 'City of Death' by (essentially) Douglas Adams is indeed one of the greatest stories of Doctor Who's run, where - apart from some typically-wobbly sets - everything just fell into place beautifully. 5. Robert Holmes was the greatest writer on old Doctor Who, and his work usually rises above the standards of the stories around it, so the period he was script editor is not surprisingly referred to as the 'Golden Age'. If you only ever watch one of his stories, the mid Tom Baker story 'The Talons of Weng-Chiang' positively drips in atmosphere. OK, it has the usual rubbish monster, but if you can see beyond the Gorn you can see beyond the giant rat. :-) Or, the Peter Davison swansong 'The Caves of Androzani', which - like all the best Doctor Who stories - has some fantastic cliffhangers. 6. Another truth among Doctor Who fans is that American fans remember their first showings in omnibus editions. As the DVDs show, the stories are episodic, and were shown one a week on a Saturday early-evening on first UK showing. Try enforcing a break between episodes wherever possible to re-create the "oh my God what happens next?!?" feeling that we UK fans remember and love. :-) 7. There is something worthy in even the worst of the programme's times. The 1980s may have been more of a pantomime at times, but every so often a jewel appeared. Colin Baker's period may have brought us 'The Twin Dilemma' with some god-awful acting, but then there was also 'Vengeance on Varos' which predicted trial by television-vote and had a fab monster. Sylvester McCoy may have started off as a spoon-playing clown, but soon became a much darker manipulator of those around him, and stories like 'Remembrance of the Daleks', 'Ghost Light' and especially 'The Curse of Fenric' show how Doctor Who could have developed had the BBC not axed it in 1989. 8. To get the full experience of 1970s Doctor Who, after any of the 1960s stories that are on DVD (if you want a bit of really-vintage TV), watch 'The Three Doctors' to get a sense of 'past Doctors', then skip to 'Robot' and carry on from there. Welcome to a whole new universe, where that strange blue box can go anywhere in time and space... :-)
Toggle Commented Jan 2, 2008 on genesis of the daleks at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply