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John Renesch
San Francisco
businessman-turned-futurist, author and international keynote speaker
Interests: beautiful women, nature, exquisite skill and mastery of all kinds, interacting with audiences from the stage, broadcasting and speaking about the future and social transformation while provoking, my friends and the human race. I love being a globalist, having U.S. and global citizenship. learning something new and the power of words. I enjoy "chick movies" and being in touch with my feelings. I still like to watch a really good auto race occasionally... but on TV now. I probably left something out but, that's a lot already!, I love beauty and the aesthetic as it shows up in people, design, poetry and the spiritual experience. I enjoy daily urban walkabouts in my beloved city of San Francisco, being on a roll when I'm in creative flow with my writing, especially when that heart-to-heart connect has been established between us. I love meeting new people and, having coffee, a drink or lunch to get to know each other even better. I love my work and cannot imagine doing much of anything else. I find great meaning and purposefulness in publishing, challenging and questioning existing mindsets and attitudes. I love my relationship to my higher power, enjoy flirting with beautiful women, the power of having access to my emotions and the portal it provides me to the sacred or divine. I used to enjoy fast cars (building them not racing them), waterskiing, boating and tennis.
Recent Activity
Marrielle, not only are you not alone, you are among the masses of people who have the privilege of having a vision beyond mere physical survival. The times are chalenging for those of us who see greater possibility for ourselves and the rest of the world. Thanks for your note and I come you come back again, John
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Hi Debbe! This subject has many of us Americans deeply polarized and, for me at least, it is puzzling why those who oppose reform are so adamant about blocking any efforts to bring sanity back to our nation on this subject. There seem to be three main lightning rods that attract all the "voltage" - the idea of "socialized medicine" (which sounds a little like socialism which is sort of like communism), the age-old bugaboo of tax increases, and the idea of the government running anything that the private sector "should" do, never mind that VA health care is hands about private insurance coverage. I see these all three of these as ideological fundamentalism, where the proponents refuse to examine their stances just like religious fundamentalists refuse to be open to anything new and make anyone who doesn't believe as they do to be sinners or the enemy. This is a crisis of the ego, where attachment to dogmatic ideas gives some solace to the egoic mind even though the idea is outmoded, unproductive and even harmful.
Toggle Commented Aug 10, 2009 on HEALTH CARE REFORM: Why the ruckus? at perspectives
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I was reminded last evening of one of the traits of our old mammalian brain - to reciprocate, to respond in kind to attacks or kind deeds. This ia part of our evolution, thousands of years of hard wired "programming" that can be very difficult to override. I post this here in the context of politicans who are given campaign donations or receive lavish lobbying who tend to feel obligated by this longtime compulsion to reciprocate the "good deeds." This insight came as a result of reading "Thank God for Evolution" yesterday and hearing the author - Michael Dowd - speak last night here in San Francisco.
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Great post, Debbe! I am keenly aware of being soemwhat out of sync with much of the world on MJ. For me, the trajedy of watching this incredibly gifted and talented young boy go in such a self destructive direction saddened me to such a degree that even his music couldn't override that for me. His many friendships with people I respect, like Qincy Jones and many others, imply for me that there was something that remained special in this many despite his self-destructive tendencies... how sad that such a talent and force of nature would be so unhappy. And, now, like you say, he's being so exploited by the media, having a field day somewhat reminescent of OJ drama some years back. Did you happen to see The Dailey Show's tear on The Today Show and Good Morning America's tour of the MJ house, NBC explaining what was here and there because the Neverland mansion was completly EMPTY! Is this obsession or what? Well, now I have had my own tear. Thanks for stirring me up. May the man rest in peace, finally.
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This from Judy Kimmel: "Interesting article regarding lobbying in this country, as a Board director of The Peace Alliance, I note that one huge area of lobbying omitted from the discussion was citizen action, whether through a C-4 or independently as individual activists. Our national organization although struggling economically in these bad economic times, has had tremendous influence in shifting conversations and expanding dialogue in educating our House and Senate members about the plethora of alternatives to violence and war, it's extreme cost to society, and the multiple solutions at our finger tips not yet acknowledged. Let's not walk the streets in protest, let's walk the Halls of Congress to influence."
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In an uncanny comparison of which party's politican are invested in what stocks, look at this graphic just published by Miller-McCune magazine: http://www.miller-mccune.com/politics/partisan-portfolios-1297. The first impression one gets is the incredulous comparisons, where one party invests heavily the other is opposite. I'll be doing more on lobbying in July.
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Debbe, Re the leaders conversation, yes we are all leaders and some if us are leading the way in doing nothing, others is apathy, still others - like people we know - leading change and transformations. But they are all leading SOMETHING! The choice is what kind of leadership are you choosing day-to-day? Sorry I'll miss the June 16 event with Joel. I hope to catch the next one.
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Thanks Debbe, glad it struck a chord with you....as they said years ago, words are only a small part of our communication (like seven percent or so) ...the rest is nonverbal. Love your example from Idol too!
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Share away, Debbe! It is very gratifying to get so much feedback on a form of expression I rarely use. Thanks!
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Steve, thanks and yes, welcoming in the new and allowing the outmoded to die without knowing exactly what the new ill look like does require faith and vision, not likely to be present if we are huddled together in fear.
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Thanks, Fred. here's the original song from the 1960s: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0g9PiEgYYUU&feature=PlayList&p=1A2E57316B1C6838&playnext=1&index=28
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Judith, here's another video with Lynne Twist's take on the crisis as opportunity: http://www.soulofmoney.info/ And remember the Chinese language has two symbols for "crisis" - one means 'danger' and the other is 'opportunity.' Thanks for you comment,
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Welcome, Stephen, bitterness and all. Thanks for your candor and willingness to look at your own contribution to the painful divide that exists in our beloved United States. This divide is deep and won't be healed easily, to be sure, but it starts with a willingness to engage. Presently I am engaged with a conservative friend who consistently brands me a raging liberal. Our last email exchange was prompted by his reaction to my last newsletter editorial (http://www.renesch.com/newsletters/aha125.htm ). He sees things in my editorials that I cannot see, as if he's reading a different article! After several exchanges, we hit an impasse which I consider a recess until it occurs to me how I can further the dialogue without pouring more gasoline on the fire. It is challenging! But continued willingness to stand toe to toe and remain engaged - even if a recess every now and then it needed - is the only way to mend matters and heal. There's is nothing wrong with disagreement and differences. In fact differences is one of the things that makes our country great. But disrespect, arrogance, righteousness and meanspiritedness poison the well of reconciliation.
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Doug, I suppose that is the question...tired and distracted, like sleepwalking, suggests there's still life...that the self isn't dead yet...just entranced and capable of being revived. There's hope if we can reawaken, revive or come back to life. There's no hope if we have "died" spiritually - where the lifeforce has left us permanently. Thanks for your responses, Doug. Best, John
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PS: The picture above is of the famous stone carvings of Easter Island, the only remaining signs of a civilization that once inhabited this former paradise. The indigenous people of the Island were so fixated on their massive carvings (so important in their culture) and moving them across the island they decimated their forests for the wood to move these huge structures to their final resting place. The shrinking forest led to the extinction of food sources for them, they starting warring amongst each other and, eventually, died out altogether.
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Here is a video of a woman filmmaker shareing her work depicting the human experience on both sides of present day conflicts: http://www.ted.com/talks/view/id/55 Her dream occurred on May 10 worldwide as "Pangea Day."
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Indeed, being in intimate relationships can be a certain accelerant for growth and learning, especially loving relationships. Here's a Rumi line that appeared this morning as a signature for a friend's email: “Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers you have built against it.” - Jalaluddin Rumi
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Dear Vahid and Aziz, Did I offend with my last comment? If so, I am sorry. Perhaps you could help me see what I do not see. I am very interested in learning and exploring our commonalities, personally and culturally. I have less interest in "discussing" things like the past unless it helps bridge any gap between us as people and as nations. There are plenty of other venues to discuss and intellectualize (such as the Foresight Network). I'd love to hear from you on what it means to be an Iranian these days. I'm happy to share anything you'd like to know about being an American. This is the way our conversation began. Can we pick up on that again? All the best, John
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Vahid, this may be of interest to a probability theorist but not to me. Also, these data mix apples and oranges....we came to the aid of the allies in both World Wars and were a part of an alliance (NATO and the UN) in two other conflicts. From my POV we started going off the tracks with Vietnam where we thought we could do what the French could not and failed miserably. Without referencing the past, there is no reason for there to be future wars. If it was bound to happen I could go into other work. But I am not a fatalist nor a cynic. I will continue doing what I can to advocate a better future for the world - a world that doesn't need to revert to military conflict when differences arise, much like what South Africa did in 1994.
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Vahid, here's an example of language differences (or perhaps how we each translate)....when you say "absolutely no reason" I hear mystery or unexplained phenomenon. That's why I offered some explanation for the end of the Cold War. A surprise or unanticipated event is different from my POV (point of view). The fall of the Berlin Wall without any opposition was very symbolic to many of us as the "beginning of the end" of European communism and the unravelling of the Soviet Union. I have written about this as the collective loss of legitimacy for the Wall, the domination of the USSR and the cultural divide. East German soldiers failed to fire their weapons whereas perhaps the day before they may have shot the people who stormed the Wall to tear it down. But legitimacy for the Wall dissipated among the governemnts, the military and the people.....so it came down. Could the U.S. unravel in a similar way? I doubt it since we started as a collection of states unlike the Soviets who defeated and occupied their "states." Not that America hasn't been marching somewhat imperialistically in recent years but the original 48 states are willingly part of the republic. Will the American Empire collapse? It very well could given that all empires collapse eventually and almost all through their own hubris, causing themselvs to implode (to come apart from within).
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Vahid, in the case of the USSR/US Cold War, it did not end for "absolutely no reason." It ended because the USSR came unglued...imploded on itself. Some Americans still take credit for "winning the Cold war" but there was no victory per se as the other side simply dissolved back into independent states following Gorbachev's announcement of perestroika and glasnost. Here's a summary from Wikipedia: In December 1989, Gorbachev and George H.W. Bush declared the Cold War officially over at a summit meeting in Malta. But by then, the Soviet alliance system was on the brink of collapse, and the Communist leaders of the Warsaw Pact states were losing power. In the USSR itself, Gorbachev tried to reform the party to destroy resistance to his reforms, but, in doing so, ultimately weakened the bonds that held the state and union together. By February 1990, the Communist Party was forced to surrender its 73-year old monopoly on state power. By December of the next year, the union-state also dissolved, breaking the USSR up into fifteen separate independent states. Is this new information for you, Vahid? I am interested in how Iranians remember how it happened. This could be another example of how each of us sees different news or media and is subject to different "spins" of the facts.
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Vahid, interesting how our perspectives differ based upon our sources of information. Perhaps we could also discuss this when we speak by Skype next week. Are both your references to Cold Wars between our two countries or are you referring to the USSR/US Cold War that ended around 1991?
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Dear Vahid and Aziz, I just learned from the publisher of Confessions of an Economic Hit Man that an embargo prevents us from sending you the books for the U.S. I will have to contact their international distributor and hopefully they can send them. Apparently, "Neither Fed-Ex, UPS or USPS can deliver to this country" acoording to the publisher. This seems so nonsensical to me! More of the insane behavior and attitudes of governments. So the books will not be arriving quite as soon as we would have wished. I am posting this information here in the blog so others who are not posting but still reading can know this. Best to you both, John
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Aziz, you bring up what might be another possible commonality in how our countries perceive each other. Because of Bush and his ties to the fundamentalist Christian right, America could be seen as a theo/democracy of sorts. I suspect most Americans presume Iran is a fundamentalist Islamic theocracy. Do you believe your President reflects the majority view of all Iranians? For instance, are they as opposed to the state of Israel and committed to obliterate it as he is (or at least as he says)? Do you have polls in your country that provide insights to public opinion?
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