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Jonhusband
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> I could not agree more. Thingamy was ahead of its time "x" years ago, and arguably still is. Old mental models and the decisions about software and processes that those models foster die slow and hard.
Just beautiful.
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To put it into the Dumpster where it will be available to all and sundry ?
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Carrots last a much longer time than broccoli in the Commons Refrigerator. Check behind the unit to make sure it is not propped up by sticks.
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What is this thing you call Wealth Bondage ?
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Often a small heavily armed well organized top down force, as in Libya can defeat a networked rabble. Elsewhere the rabble prevails. Then perhaps it falls under its new Napoleon or Imam. The tools change, maybe. The rest ..the people, the issues, the weather, etc. ? Same as it ever was.
Toggle Commented Mar 24, 2011 on Celebrity Tweet Ghost Writer Wanted at Gift Hub
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There wasn't television then, and in a different era it was a relatively 'mature' society of settlers and founders of communities (and the country). Whole different frame for conducting one's life back then. Building something .. for a future that veered in a different direction, permanently.
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Those are interesting questions, and I am interested in offering a response .. not answers. But I am getting onto a plane in a few hours (at 6h00 am) and will not be able to respond until tomorrow some time. Till then ...
Toggle Commented Oct 11, 2010 on La société émergente du XXI° siècle at Gift Hub
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Money makes the world go round, the world go round, the world go round .. Time to watch the movie Cabaret again, but with a Tea Party context as background props ?
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""You're so goddamned concerned about civilians and I don't give a damn. I don't care."" I guess he just needed an afternoon tryst that day ?
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Well articulated .. thank you, John. More attempts to put the rabble in its place will follow, no doubt. And a good chance that over time those attempts will be more successful than not .. and then, will what I and others have called "soft fascism" truly dominate ?
Interesting article on Microsoft's declining effectiveness: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/04/opinion/04brass.html?hp
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"There are a lot of people that like working in the hierarchical organization. Yes, there are frustrations." Indeed .. and hierarchy and hierarchical organizations are not going away any time soon. And, indeed, effective division of labour combined with intelligently-designed processes are one of the best ways, if not THE best, to find efficiencies for some kinds of work. Manufacturing things is one of those kinds of work. And yes, I think there are many people that prefer the relative stability and lack of ambiguity that comes from clear roles in a more highly-structured organization. That's completely understandable (after all, the last 4 or 5 generations have generally experienced that, in the developed world, and so it has become the way things are, or should be, in their eyes). And indeed it has brought many much material well-being. But it's also difficult to rebut findings such as were brought forward by the famous (or infamous) Whitehall study. I don't think anyone is claiming that the changes we are discussing are going to all happen in a few short years. Rather, it's likely that there will be gradual (and often very bumpy) transition over a couple or several decades. And I repeat, traditional hierarchy is not going to disappear overnight .. and nor should it. It should be used where it is most effective, but maybe not so much as a general iron-clad rule ? But / and continuing increases in efficiency and effectiveness would seem to be closely related to bringing the best available knowledge and creativity to bear on an ongoing basis as the future unfolds .. and that is certainly one place where networked collaboration comes into play. If the extant structures and processes are so good as to not need change, why then has there been such consistent calling for cross-functional and interdisciplinary exchange and collaboration (frustratingly more-often-than-not unattainable) by so many strategy, organizational effectiveness and general business gurus for so long now? "But, done well and with smart people and good management, it can be an efficient way to get things done." Yes, see above. But I think it's quite important to consider the nature of work and the nature of the market(s) that work serves. Anyway, I don't think it's an either / or but rather that oh-so-trendy both / and. To me it seems clear that with the information and network infrastructure we now have and are growing familiar with, it is possible to centralize (and typically that means make hierarchical) that which benefits most from the centralization whilst at the same time decentralizing (putting into networks and the attendant dynamics) that which will benefit in effectiveness from that decentralization. Which is, in overly simplistic terms,meant by chaordic. I think that organizations that provide services that rely on information and intelligence derived from the continuously changing markets for those services are, at this stage of things, those organizations who would benefit most from less reliance on all hierarchy all the time. One of the interesting cases to look at is the military, where for certain aspects of the organization's functioning, they are increasingly turning to various aspects and elements of social computing as ways to reduce time to enactable operational intelligence. Rob would probably know more about that than me. Many existing big bad hierarchic organizations that deliver things like Internet services are reasonably well-protected from their areas of ineffectiveness by legislation, as I believe you would acknowledge. And certainly there are market 'habits' that have been built up over time. To pretend that there are not massive changes unfolding, and that there are likely to be more changes yet to come, is, I think, just being (or choosing to be) relatively ill-informed, or picking just what one wants to look at. Certainly I have been accused of that in the past .. however, I like to think that rather than just arguing back from a rigidly held point of view, I have listened, gathered my skirts and gone off in search of more information and examples from which to learn. I'll let others who know me vouch for whether or not that is more true than not.
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"the old organization style seems to work best." And your evidence would be ___________, Tom ?
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Re: your "the introduction of new technology or even older technologies into an environment unfamiliar with these technologies will revolutionize management practices and how work is done." You might find a piece I wrote a couple of years ago titled "Will Enterprise 2.0 Drive Management Innovation?" of interest. http://www.fastforwardblog.com/2008/01/10/will-enterprise-20-drive-management-innovation/
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Dec 21, 2009