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Jim Belfiore
Sebago, ME
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Hi Katie, You've touched a soft spot in this article with me, as my wife designs and builds sculptural furniture and art (many with hidden chambers and functions) of many sizes, with a particularly creative theme. So you'll forgive me for proudly sharing a few links. ;-) http://io9.com/5035872/the-best-rocket-ship-hiding-place-you-ever-saw http://jykboxes.com
Toggle Commented Jul 30, 2010 on Furniture with hidden talents. at Get Fresh Minds
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As I've said before, hope is a four-letter word. http://andromeda-30.blogspot.com/2009/10/hope-is-four-letter-word.html The lack of innovation vision on the part of multiple administrations (but certainly our current and most merciful leaders take the cake) has all but guaranteed the technical and societal stagnation of at least two generations. Anyone who looks at the Moon or Mars as merely a place is not only blind, but are willfully driving spikes through their eyes. Returning to the Moon and going to Mars (and staying there) is not about creating jobs in Alabama and Florida. It's about curing cancer, heart disease, and a whole host of problems that need to be dealt with when it takes years to get *anywhere* in the solar system with no hospital but what you bring with you. Returning humans to interplanetary space is about discovering solutions to problems you never thought of until the impossible constraints of human space flight are brought front and center. Why did we stop treating blood diseases with leeches? At some point, someone took a risk to explore the boundaries of their understanding. Why did we start flying to other continents? At some point, the risks of not trying exceeded the risk of failure. Why, in the face of trillion dollar deficits, debts, and government backstops are we pulling $18 billion on any attempt (flawed or otherwise) to return to the Moon? The only risk I see is to a few hundred re-elections. My opinion on hope hasn't varied. As for the change? Keep it.
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Since our discussion here in June, we've not only had a chance to meet in person, but I recently revisited this topic in a dedicated article that you might find of interest. Great to finally have met last month in Boston, BTW. http://andromeda-30.blogspot.com/2009/10/hope-is-four-letter-word.html
Toggle Commented Nov 9, 2009 on Hopeful Innovation at Innovation in Practice
Well said, and unfortunately I agree. http://andromeda-30.blogspot.com/2009/07/three-years-at-horizon.html
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Tears were shed last night as well watching Walter anchor the events of 40 years past. For many of us, the childhood memories of Apollo, and the years that followed were both strong, and front-loaded with eventual disappointment. So much was achieved, and has since been squandered, abandoned, and left to rot. http://andromeda-30.blogspot.com/2009/07/three-years-at-horizon.html
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Very cool footage and editing to give the viewer the illusion of moving frame of reference. I wonder what the dispersal patterns of the plume looked like after 24-72 hours after the ejecta penetrated the upper atmospheric levels. (The ISS wouldn't have seen it on following orbits, but geostationary meteorology satellites should have caught something, albeit at lower resolutions.)
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Now I, for one, know that the business will only benefit if your game improves. Unfortunately where your boss is concerned, you're just a pawn in his diabolic game of checkers. ;-) http://bit.ly/TCbx0
Toggle Commented Jun 23, 2009 on Whoops! Is it my move? at The Chess Dog Journal
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Nice article, Drew. Unfortunately, I have to disagree with you a bit here. I certainly do agree that morale and attitude have a direct impact on creativity, innovation, job performance, and a whole host of related metrics. Hope, however, is a weak lever at best. It's actually ironic you bring this topic up now, I just published an article in which I state that "Hope is a four-letter word" - we must have gotten the same writing assignment memo from the union muse. ;-) (You can read my article here: http://bit.ly/qgwoM ) Hope implies a surrendering of control. "I hope my situation improves" casts fate to the winds, no matter what the scenario. I would go so far as to claim that you cannot have hope and empowerment together in the same action. You are either resolved to lead, or be led. You may arrive at the same place at the end of the journey, but only one path with teach you what you need to continue.
Toggle Commented Jun 14, 2009 on Hopeful Innovation at Innovation in Practice
Your timing in Europe is serendipitous with an article published this morning. "Innovation recovery plans in chaos, says report - Published: Thursday 4 June 2009 A report to be published in a month's time lambasts national recovery plans for failing to achieve global coordination of innovation policies to combat the recession. It concludes that a massive global conference on innovation is needed to promote cross-border collaboration." http://bit.ly/l31MY What do you think of this article and the associated reports? Do they have any bearing on what you're seeing? Are European governments blinded to the activities you're seeing on the front lines?
Toggle Commented Jun 4, 2009 on Field Notes – June 2009 at Innovating To Win
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I couldn't help but have a strange feeling of deja vu when the fail whale kept appearing in my window while I seated over the wing of a Wi-Fi enabled flight across the US. http://bit.ly/kDuey
Toggle Commented May 19, 2009 on Twitter Take Two at Innovating To Win
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Thanks for sharing your insights and especially the link to Waiter Rant's article. Its very timely for a project I'm working on at the moment.
Toggle Commented Aug 27, 2008 on i thought i was the only one at WWdN: In Exile
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Thanks for sharing your insights and especially the link to Waiter Rant's article. Its very timely for a project I'm working on at the moment.
Toggle Commented Aug 27, 2008 on i thought i was the only one at WWdN: In Exile
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Hey Wil, Star Trek is platform that you'll always be able to stand on whenever you want. Think about it. When you're pushing 85 you're likely to have more of a teen-lust following than anyone else in your age group. (That may not be a bad problem to have.) You should *always* focus on the future, because you never know what influences you're going to have on people because of your future works. You don't want to get to 85 and reflect on your life as having been spent mostly reflecting on the past. I got hooked on the TOS in the '60s. When TNG came along, the teen-aged whiz-kid wasn't a character I really identified with. However, it introduced me to an actor who I've recently rediscovered as a really great writer, and has a lot of interesting things to say here and now. (Did you ever think when you were tapping your console across from Brent that it was a necessary step to becoming a best-selling author someday?) You are not Wesley (I think there's a book in there somewhere), but the fun you had from those days is an essential part of the works you have yet to create, if you choose. All the best.
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Hey Wil, Star Trek is platform that you'll always be able to stand on whenever you want. Think about it. When you're pushing 85 you're likely to have more of a teen-lust following than anyone else in your age group. (That may not be a bad problem to have.) You should *always* focus on the future, because you never know what influences you're going to have on people because of your future works. You don't want to get to 85 and reflect on your life as having been spent mostly reflecting on the past. I got hooked on the TOS in the '60s. When TNG came along, the teen-aged whiz-kid wasn't a character I really identified with. However, it introduced me to an actor who I've recently rediscovered as a really great writer, and has a lot of interesting things to say here and now. (Did you ever think when you were tapping your console across from Brent that it was a necessary step to becoming a best-selling author someday?) You are not Wesley (I think there's a book in there somewhere), but the fun you had from those days is an essential part of the works you have yet to create, if you choose. All the best.
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Been lurking on and off for a while. Great stuff, Wil. Thanks for the Propeller pointer, and best of luck on the latest book. Sounds like a fun read. If you're looking for more geek-business distractions mixed with a touch of just about anything else, come visit 'Thirty Minutes From Andromeda' (http://andromeda-30.blogspot.com) All the best.
Toggle Commented Aug 2, 2008 on calling all geeks at WWdN: In Exile
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Been lurking on and off for a while. Great stuff, Wil. Thanks for the Propeller pointer, and best of luck on the latest book. Sounds like a fun read. If you're looking for more geek-business distractions mixed with a touch of just about anything else, come visit 'Thirty Minutes From Andromeda' (http://andromeda-30.blogspot.com) All the best.
Toggle Commented Aug 2, 2008 on calling all geeks at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply