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Jason Scott
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Well, hello. I figured there'd be more of you, as well. Here's the thing. First of all, I deal with a bunch of marketers and have done so for quite a few years - Sockington is the big thing I'm known for now but I've had my scary hands in a lot of variant pies. In fact, one might feel liberal and consider me a marketer as well - I have promoted films I make as a documentary filmmaker, and in doing so have had to deal with people as promoter, salesman, customer service, and all the other roles. Eli let us know about a week before the event that our talks would be limited to 15 minutes (with 10 minutes for talk). We also had our talk topics assigned to us. I rebelled on both counts, so my talk was a little longer than that, but not much. This meant I could cover some portion of what I wanted to say, but I would totally understand if subtleties were lost. So let's focus on one that might have helped. "Spammer" is just your word for "person who uses techniques I don't like or think are obviously harmful", but in point of fact the assault on Sockington's audience has ranged to a much greater amount than just simple linkspam. As I mentioned in the talk, people have contacted me in full human non-bot language asking Socks to mention things in return for potential cash. I've had places try to get him to endorse things, not necessarily because it would make sense for a virtual cat to spontaneously "endorse" half this stuff, but because his audience represents easy mindshare. I had one awesome human vermin talk "about" Socks in his twitter feed, alleging that he shouldn't be on twitter because Sockington violates terms of service of Twitter. Then, he started writing that I was trying to have him silenced and removed from twitter. When I finally called the guy at his house to tell him to knock it off, he was all sweetness and smiles, and then started twittering that I was calling him at his house. The thing is, people who do awful things, like some marketers, very rarely think they're doing awful things. They do awful things because they've convinced themselves they're doing good things. It's great to follow and follow and make up fake friendships, because that's building your audience. It's good to send girls into bars with buckets of free drinks to smile and charm lonely men into thinking someone is paying attention to them. It's good to refer to coagulate language into meaningless phrases because of a lowest common denominator approach to communication in the name of selling. The mind, you see, is quite capable of convincing itself of a lot of things. This is what I was addressing - the slow descent of realizing that you can get a slightly nicer car if you don't go out of your way to point out that a product can make people sick, or to hound vulnerable people temporarily in a world spotlight into allowing your client's product to sit on a table near them. What does it hurt? Who does it hurt? The shift is slow, methodical, and can take a long time. This is what I wanted to get across. In 20 minutes. While being funny. I did my best. I stand by it. Don't act like marketing is just "the good stuff", and I promise I won't act like marketing is just "the bad stuff".
Toggle Commented Sep 18, 2009 on Spam is not Marketing at Rocket Watcher
1 reply
I like the video, but I might only think that because I directed it.
1 reply
I like the video, but I might only think that because I directed it.
1 reply