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Kanani Fong
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Very very good jobs, and ones with a future!
Toggle Commented Oct 27, 2013 on Oracle sees the value of vets at BlackFive
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Superb company & program. The Oracle Injured Veterans Internship & Training Program is a full-time paid internship. After being taken through many aspects of the program, most of the interns advance to full time careers with Oracle.
Toggle Commented Oct 25, 2013 on Oracle sees the value of vets at BlackFive
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Crap. This happened to me one hot summer day as I was bringing the trash cans in. The neighbor lady took it upon herself to attempt a discourse on our involvement in Afghanistan. I didn't attribute it to her being white, as much as I did with her being a woman with no military experience, who votes left, and runs in insular circles. I no longer speak to her, and my dog barks at her when he sees her now. I don't know Wu's background, but I do know plenty of Americans of Chinese heritage who serve our nation now, and also did in the past. This includes my Dad, Mom, and all of my uncles. Bless them. They all would have kicked Wu's ass. But yes, I'll agree with you about how the education of the Chinese has been bereft facts about other nations.
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A few years ago, I had the pleasure of being at a conference with 2 members of a FET out of Camp Pendleton. Their in-depth knowledge of health care needs of women in rural villages was unparalleled, and the amount of knowledge these two had with them simply incredible. They were dedicated, intelligent, and definitely had an eye to the future of Afghanistan's women and children. What a shame it is to see they won't be utilized anymore, and how fortunate I was to have met them.
Toggle Commented Jan 11, 2013 on The end of female engagement teams at BlackFive
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Nicely parsed, Jimbo.
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Where do I start? I could say cynically, "Welcome to managed care." In so many ways, moves like this smack of the cost cutting that has been going on in managed care on the civilian side for decades --though not necessarily by re-examining a medical diagnosis. The DSM-IV criteria for PTSD is very clear, and in order for someone to qualify they must hit every single one of those points. Ideally, a psychiatric intake is exhaustive, and examined not by one person, but a team. So I wonder a couple of things. Why this? Why now? How far back do they intend to go? Were the intake process and results properly done in the first place? Was a Dx of PTSD given out regardless of outcome? Or is this a measure to cut costs over the long haul brought about by (what has been termed as) and epidemic rise in diagnosis? Of course, it could be neither of these things, but their actions deserve scrutiny and solid answers. All are troubling scenarios because there are people who think PTSD is a load of bullshit anyway. This only confirms their sentiment, and also does nothing to alleviate the stigma of mental health, nor encourages people from reaching out to get help. Best, K
Toggle Commented Feb 15, 2012 on Downgrading PTSD to save money? at BlackFive
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Agreed. This behavior doesn't start overnight. He was a narcissistic jackwagon from day one. I hope he gets fat.
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Excellent piece. Written very honestly, and without sentimentality. The specifics make it both real and memorable. Thank you for taking the time to pen your thoughts. Awesome! -K
Toggle Commented Oct 31, 2011 on Relief Or Regret? at BlackFive
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Just want to clarify his work with Tim Lynch (Free Range International) is limited to ride-along status. News from colleagues of Tim has indicated MY is not employed nor helps with the work.
Toggle Commented Oct 29, 2011 on Honor and Courage at BlackFive
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It's great to see Therapeutic Riding used for chronic, complex PTSD. It has used for decades for everything from cerebral palsy, autism, traumatic brain injuries, clinical depression, anxiety-panic disorders and more. Cognitive and sensory processing therapies can be delivered to the client while on horseback, usually guided by a treatment team consisting of an occupational and sometimes a physical therapist. Our son took part in this when he was young, and we have never forgotten how beneficial it was. I saw amazing progress in so many of the clients on our weekly visits over the course of many years. Studies are needed so access to therapies such as this are funded and become part and parcel of companion treatment options for our veterans. And thank you for being so supportive Jimbo. She is one lucky woman!
Toggle Commented Oct 14, 2011 on Equine therapy for wounded warriors at BlackFive
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As someone who majored in the Fine Arts, and has made her living wordsmithing, let me say this: my classes were not easy. In fact, they could be brutal, and those of us who survived through whatever agenda the teacher had emerged with a sense of self. I continue to have my knowledge tested, and I've never regretted my education. There's room for everyone, but unlike the kids today I never had the sense of entitlement that anyone owed me anything. I think it's part of what we see out there today. For sure, I don't want to turn this in to a tirade that the younger generations are shit, and the world is hopeless. Because frankly, that's what every older generation has done since the beginning of time. Besides, this younger generation was created by --you guessed it, people older than them. I look at the Wall Street kids, and I think of my own who is in High School. She and her friends are taking AP, Honors, or are in an IB program. They work tremendously hard. However, as a parent who sees her kid doing a huge load of paperwork each evening (and indeed, I did get into this with the teacher), I find myself questioning whether this emphasis on "the right" classes creates a sense of entitlement. (FYI, I didn't put her in these classes, rather she came to me and said she wanted to do them. I'm the furthest thing from a Tiger Mom as you could get. Tiger Mom probably has my picture on a board and throws darts at it). I'm not nearly as pessimistic as Froggy. I don't think they emerge uneducated and unable prior from high school. However, I do think that what we've created generations of people used to cramming their heads full of facts and theory, however, they tend to think along very ordinary lines. In other words, for all those AP classes, the brutal truth is that most people are average. The difference here is that many skirt the edge of a work ethic, but don't really grasp it. The sense of entitlement is expressed as, "I"m not going to start at the bottom," "Rather than getting a job, I'll just keep applying for more Post Doc grants and live off those," or brazenly asking an elder, "How much do you make?" Their mindset is 1. They'll walk into a 50-70k a year job; 2. Their job selections will be plentiful; 3. All jobs should pay a shitload of money. And truthfully? Go to any primary school career day, and the first question out of the mouth of babes is about your earnings. (Yes, Emily Post has been shot repeatedly). Obviously, there are people who will walk into that high paying first job, and sometimes that Post Doc will go onto riches and their research is used for great benefit. But these opportunities have become fewer. So what emerges is a state of outrage --everyone, from their parents, teachers, the glossy magazines, their peers, all assumed that the path after would be gilded. They thought they could live like Kim Kardashian --but there's only one KK, unless you count her sisters. But really --I wonder: was the path they chose (the one that exacted student loans in excess of 30-40k a year) the only one they saw? Maybe. Because for over 3 decades we have whittled away in the high schools and community colleges any inkling that there is another path that would have led to a trade. And maybe, they would have been better off there. Maybe, we as a nation would have been better for it too. And that isn't to say that the trades never utilized technology, math, chemistry, even physics. They did. When my Dad went to school, accounting was considered a trade and he and the others went to Business school. But somewhere along the line society assumed the place to go to was college --not to learn skill sets that would have you fixing or innovating, but theories, which often got you jobs in bureaucracies (both governmental and corporate) or were the kinds of jobs dependent on grants that inevitably came from the US Gov. And as much as I have to say that I loved my own classical education, getting it to pay has required acumen and hustle --things that are as far away as you can imagine from the bucolic scenes so often portrayed in movies. Anyway, not to belabor the point, but I happen to have two kids at either end of the spectrum. One hated school, but has found success in the hustle and flow of 2 jobs while taking a class at the community college. The other is a naturally gifted learner and succeeds in school. They will both be able and ready to work because I give them very little, I expect them to work, and they do perform. The challenge for parents is to raise people who look for solutions, accept where they are, are always in the present, and have a work ethic that always says, "I will." I think those who want to work really hard and are humble enough to do it, will always be able to make a legal living. The others on Wall Street? I don't have time because I am always working.
Toggle Commented Oct 14, 2011 on Total Failure at BlackFive
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You did the absolute right thing.
Toggle Commented Jul 21, 2011 on Break Glass in case of War at One Marine's View
Excellent. Thanks for sparing no words or specifics. "Watch the casualty number grow following July and sequential withdrawals." And that's not only our troops, is everyone's, but most especially the Afghans themselves. The Taliban are shooting kids as it is, and blowing them up. On Sunday, one little girl in Uruzgan was "paid" and handed a bag to deliver to the police. The bag blew up enroute. She was 8. Read it here. Also, this article was written by an Afghan prior to the announcement: Afghans Imagine A Country Without Foreign Forces. The writer speaks to someone who talks about quickly slipping into civil war.
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Bravo, Mr. Stokely. Well done.
Toggle Commented Jun 21, 2011 on Father's Day for a Gold Star Dad at BlackFive
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Oh, I'm glad you went. I can't think of two people who have worked so hard for veterans --for everyone, who deserved to go on this trip. Best wishes for the program. It's a good thing.
Toggle Commented Apr 28, 2011 on Cowboys and Soldiers... at BlackFive
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It's a GREAT article, and it was a breath of fresh air late in the day when AL posted it. It's pretty clear that when Obama said he'd veto the bill to keep the troops paid, that he really doesn't see them as people. I think, to a large extent, he views them as a nameless, faceless leviathan force. Unfortunately, there are a lot of people from from both parties who see things like this. But what we see are mothers and fathers raising kids while their loved one is deployed. The people who are going to get hurt the most in this are those at home holding down the front, trying to stoke the fires, trying to make like things are "normal" when in fact, the aren't. This just adds one more stressor. I found this written by D.O. on The Warrior Class today: "the federal clerk down the street will suffer as much as I will while this budget crisis is ongoing, yet it will be the only time she suffers for her nation. My family chose to put our lives, our safety, our security and our comfort on the line in defense of our nation. We send our husbands, wives, fathers and mothers to fight for the freedom of out country, and for the rights of the world.
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We also talked about Clay over on VFW's The National Defense yesterday.
Toggle Commented Apr 8, 2011 on Clay Hunt Tribute Video at BlackFive
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I would also submit that all White House personnel are not essential. Let the Obamas do their own cooking and cleaning of the White House. In addition, health care benefits for the House of Representatives and the Senate should also cease. Those who are overweight, have multiple health problems should go to the hospital if there's an emergency and pay out of pocket.
Toggle Commented Apr 8, 2011 on Even Obama can't be this dumb at BlackFive
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To every politician who tries to make him or herself appear as super patriotic by getting photo-ops with troops when it's time for re-election, who attends Veterans Day services and marches in front of the veterans, who acts like they couldn't see this coming, a pox on them. In addition, the armed forces are not a charity, so keep your paycheck and don't issue a press release claiming you're giving it to a military charity. Way too much political posturing here. Jim M, those troops here are essential. One example: Every military nurse, tech, & physician will continue to treat soldiers and families CONUS and OCONUS because what they do is lifesaving and necessary, not to mention essential for the ongoing morale and wellness of everyone. There are military hospitals throughout the world, and each one of them is charged with the well being of the men and women who serve. They are professionals. Building a health care team takes years. To treat them in such a desultory way is tantamount to telling them to not re-up. I could go on about shortages in some areas of seasoned health professionals, but really, I shouldn't even have to make the case. Are there changes that do need to be made? Is there money that can be saved? Sure, but no one should shut things down, & wax philosophically with a promise to pay everyone as soon as they get it figured out. You also cannot parse things right now --it's very bad for morale. We can't make the case that one group deserves to be paid more than another. It's a team effort, and each person is essential to the collective progress of the whole. If you were to --as you suggest, not pay those CONUS, but only pay those OCONUS, that would be pure bullshit. The politicians have had months and months to figure this out, and I think most were screwing around playing re-election games, posturing for cameras, & looking for sound bites instead of taking things seriously.
Toggle Commented Apr 8, 2011 on Even Obama can't be this dumb at BlackFive
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And we're also asking people to give to the Search Dog Rescue Foundation. This link has videos of the teams arriving in Japan.
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2011 on Dogs are good people at BlackFive
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Great news! Just got word from Mollybot that we've raised 46,500 yen which is over $585 USD! This will go to Animal Refuge Kansai, and if more comes in, Molly says she'll earmark some toward the 3 organizations that just formed the Japan Earthquake Animal Rescue as well. You can hit this link and it'll take you to my blog where it explains your options on how to give. Molly's up to make more handpainted thank you posters, which you can see here if you go through her etsy store, as not to deal with the kanji on the paypal. Molly makes no money on this. She only charges a handling & mailing fee for a donation of 1,000 yen ($12.60). Want pictures? This just turned up, a video for the 3 organizations plus ARK on youtube. Get tissues, or if you're a toughie, just use the back of your hand.
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2011 on Dogs are good people at BlackFive
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Labs are the most reliable and wonderful dogs on earth.
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2011 on Dogs are good people at BlackFive
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Over on The Kitchen Dispatch I joined in with some friends in and also from Japan who are raising funds for the Animal Refuge Kansai. Kansai is south of Sendai, but they are anticipating a repeat of other disasters when they received a huge influx of pets. So far, Mollybot has raised over $200. I've got instructions how to give directly to ARK or through Mollybot's etsy store. For a donation of 1,000 Yen, (12.60 US), Mollybot will even send you a posterboard thank you card with a nifty drawing. In addition, Japan Earthquake Animal Rescue & Support was formed by 3 organizations closer to Sendai. Today they've got a veterinarian going back in with them from the World Veterinary Asso. They went to Sendai to deliver food and water to pet owners, and also pick up any strays. They looked for the dogs, but have not found them. They continue their search. I've been followng JEARS on Facebook, as well as going to their new page. Every bit counts, as we found in the days and weeks following Katrina.
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2011 on Dogs are good people at BlackFive
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Why is it that I expect a Democrat Rep from the wine country of California to be more fully engaged in the experience of Charlie Sheen, than in a person who has studied war, military, strategy, culture, history, geography and has led soldiers through battle? Woolsey's comments are cheap, stupid and it would appear Woolsey has spent more time going over the rants of a hypomanic actor than picking up a book on counter insurgency. Woolsey gives all Californians a bad name, cementing the impressions we are more concerned with the rants of an out-of-work actor, than about this war, the people fighting it, and the brutality of radical islam. Those who vote her in again, deserve to drown in the vat of refermented wine she and her cohorts foist upon them.
Toggle Commented Mar 16, 2011 on Charlie Sheen strategy in Afghanistan at BlackFive
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I have to say, if either of my kids made the decision to go to an Ivy League, it would be fine with me. They would go, however, as a real asset because both are independent in thought. They have experience thinking, and talking about war and peace in very complex terms. They know that not everything is as it appears. In other words, they have a full arsenal of ideas based on experience and knowledge. So truthfully? We need kids like mine in places like this, kids who will challenge this rather pathetic group of vociferous individuals, whose shortcut to understanding is based on impressions that are incorrect.
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