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How cool! I love coming across rock art in the backcountry -- here's a striking example I found in the watershed above Fillmore last fall:http://www.achangeinthewind.com/2013/11/sexy-rock-art-in-the-sespe-wilderness-2013.html
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Not me, but a fellow I was with. Went on a weekend trip with a couple of guys, one of whom was a graphic artist, and got ahead of us on the trail, and put it together while waiting for us to to catch up. Thank you for asking --
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Hi Nancy -- happy to talk. The Google Voice button on the site actually does work, or you can email me (kitstolz@gmail.com). Will likely delete this soon so as not to be targeted by junk mail.
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We agree -- and so would Bill Patzert I believe. He's being provocative to make a point about our water consumption -- and to make sure we didn't fall asleep during the presentation. He said it other ways too -- pointing out that much of Ojai (not to mention Beverly Hills) looks like a rain forest, even though this region has little or no rain six or seven months a year. Making a point. But poking us for loving trees is more likely to get him "gasps" as the reporter said.
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Thinking about it a little, the two thinkers -- past and present -- quoted extensively by the essayist both call for thinking beyond the horizon of the personal and the temporal, as opposed to focusing intently on ourselves in the present moment (looking at you, Facebook). Does this make sense, as a way to decide what is helpful/good about digital information, and what is not? Hope so.
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Ever hear of using headlines provocatively? Next time you might want to read the whole thing before you comment on it.
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Interesting...has your perspective been written up, may I ask, in the press? Since I've been exposed to your work I've started to see the narrow-mindedness in the government's anti-tamarisk efforts, but I'm not sure how widespread that perception is, if a picture of a government scientist happily pulling a salt cedar out of a creek bed in this recent High Country News story on the issue is representative: http://www.hcn.org/issues/45.18/new-hope-for-the-delta
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Well, you're not the only one who doesn't blindly trust Google, as this amusing cartoon shows. http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2013/11/03/207265/mcclatchy-cartoons-for-the-week.html I'm gullible when it comes to the big G and admit it.
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Thanks for the comment...groundwater "pumped out for use and plate tectonics?" Groundwater being pumped out for use I understand, but don't know what is meant by "plate tectonics" in this instance. Curious.
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I so hope the troubles with blockbusters will lead to more good indy movies, but when good independent movie people like Steven Soderbergh are throwing in the towel and moving to television you gotta wonder,
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Jeez...away on a vacation with the family...anyhow, the link above takes you to "a news from around the Arctic" blog with a story that leads: "If you wanted hot weather this week, you should have been in Greenland." At the bottom of the story it is mentioned that the 25.9C temperature was amended by the meteorological institute to 24C, which was not a record breaker. On the other hand, the warming trend in the Arctic is undeniable, and -- for many scientists -- beyond alarming. Here's the start of a recent post on the question of warming in the far north from the Arctic Sea Ice Blog: http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2013/07/arctic-time-bombs.html#more "While keeping an eye on day-to-day data and speculating about whether 2013 is going to overcome the odds and break last year's records, one tends to forget about the wider implications and what this actually is all about. A tree is incredibly interesting, but in the end it's all about the forest. It's important to remember that the situation isn't looking good in the Arctic. Not good at all. We're witnessing things that were supposed to happen decades from now. Instead we're looking at a change that is hard to fathom, but takes place during our lifetimes, not on a geological timescale." Is the story that matters the tree, or the forest? The exact number for that day in that location, or the trend?
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Really an interesting comment, Michael. Essay worthy, I'd say. Or perhaps you're thinking of your own experience at San Francisco's Civic Center and symphony/opera? http://sfciviccenter.blogspot.com/
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Well, I think that asking the logical follow-up question (to what Pavley said the day before) is not the same thing as throwing in the towel. But I have to agree that "shining a light," which is what enterprising reporters try to do, is not necessarily the same thing as leading the way. Sometimes that is a problem for advocates, but I can't stop asking questions.
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The meteorological community holds that the instrumental record of global temperatures begins in the 1880's. Would be interesting to know what that apparent consensus is based on. It's likely cited in the study, which is available above, and which I confess I haven't dived into yet. Been deep in a geological story, with its own set of studies.
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I did not, unfortunately....haven't heard that one. Looking for it did come across some interesting items, including a recording of Keith Jarrett playing Harrison (w/others). Will wonders never cease...
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Yet another classic I have yet to read! Thanks Mike.
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You're right -- Rall's piece was as full-on essay, complete with an amazing quotation from a Time magazine of decades ago, if I understood correctly, and countless links and specifics about a generational rub. (Or not.) Rall does often rant on the site, but this was much more.
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Heard from a young hiker on the trail named Tyler, from Thousand Oaks, that this book is now available for free on Kindle. Just saying.
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Thanks Mike. Thought of you guys, possibly visiting Palm Springs (which has remarkably big square blocks when seen from above).. My buddy Chris recovered, and far outstripped me as we approached the end of the trail near I-10 in the San Gorgonio pass. Think he's had enough of thru-hiking, sadly for me, but not backpacking: he (and I) will be out again. For me, perhaps not so long...hope to do about 500 miles of the PCT this year.
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Thanks for filling us in. Goes straight to the point.
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Readers should note that in response to this story...the commentator launches an unrelated and unsubstantiated attack on a much more famous and influential scientist. The best defense is a good offense, I suppose, but for me, the fact that the allegation was not denied by either Soon or his would-be defender is proof enough of its validity.
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The mapping of disposal wells in Texas via the Texas Tribune is very impressive and a great idea. I wish I had these kind of big data skills, but maybe that's something I could shoot for over time. I recall Andrew Revkin of the NY Times discussing a site that focused on fracking in Pennsylvania. He said the creator of the site transferred the numbers from the state's database on fracking -- completely legally -- to an interactive site in four hours (once it had been set up). Could be an enormously useful tool around here (potentially).
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That's absolutely the right question, Brian. Fracking is too big and too complex a question for local regulation alone. The leading environmentalist in the county, Supervisor Steve Bennett, went to a State Senate committee hearing to beg regulators for help. "Bennett said to the state Senate panel: “I implore you: The state has to do something.'” From a story by Marianne Ratcliff in the Santa Paula Times: http://www.santapaulatimes.com/news/fullstory.php/aid/26869/V.C._supervisor_at_fracking_hearing:_I_implore_you:__91The_state_has_to_do_something_92.html
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Well, as usual, you make a great point. More than one, actually, but it's so true that Monroe was really funny. I was thinking about "The Seven-Year Itch," which despite its famous title, despite Billy Wilder, and despite an iconic image of Monroe in her prime, still is a pretty crummy movie. (Tom Ewell is pretty much unbearable.) But somehow Monroe, despite being pinned like a butterfly to an awful role, escapes into frivolity and delight. It's amazing. I also was a little stunned by the Grissom website. I only wish he sourced his entries, so I could double-check, but evidently some version of the site will be published. It's an amazing piece of work, and you can really hear Williams voice (when he quotes him).
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Thank you for your incredibly thoughtful comments, Brian. No one (in my experience, at least) wields logic more powerfully than JS Mill. (Plus, because he's a good writer, he's underrated as a philosopher.) But I wonder if Mill wouldn't make a distinction between regulating tobacco, and punishing smokers. Most smokers today want to quit, but many simply can't. Given that tragic fact, to want to make tobacco as expensive and obscure as possible, especially for vulnerable young people, is a kindness, not a cruelty.
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