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Jim Lippard
Phoenix, AZ
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Item 6 I find the most baffling. Were you just attempting to file a complaint over the phone with an individual employee who was being unhelpful, perhaps out of misguided self-preservation? There's still something to be said for writing and sending a letter or email, at least then you know its content as submitted is what you wrote.
Alan Haworth, _Anti-libertarianism_ Jonathan Wolff, _Robert Nozick: Property, Justice, and the Minimal State_ David Schmidtz, _Elements of Justice_ Jeffrey Friedman, "What's Wrong with Libertarianism" (and the subsequent exchange with Tom Palmer, who proceeds to prove Friedman's points)
Just came back and saw your response. Global Crossing came out of bankruptcy in 2003 with a publicly traded stock--NASDAQ: GLBC.
Global Crossing Ltd. is still in business (and I don't think there ever was a Global Crossing LLC). It emerged from Ch. 11 bankruptcy in 2003.
My take on Sylvia Allen's latest: http://lippard.blogspot.com/2009/07/arizona-state-senator-sylvia-allen.html
1 reply
It's a pity that most of the advocates of net neutrality simply don't understand the current technology, law, or politics of how the Internet functions, and are making lots of erroneous claims based on that misinformation. I don't entirely side with the telcos--they are clearly after their own interests here--but their statements generally tend to have more factual accuracy around them (except when they try to pretend this is an issue of backbone capacity rather than last-mile capacity). I've posted a number of entries at my blog trying to help sort out the facts. I think the basic principles of net neutrality in the FCC statement are quite reasonable, but I strongly disagree that the FCC is a good entity to start making detailed rules and regulations about what net neutrality means (these are the guys that regulate "indecent" content, remember!), and many of the things that net neutrality advocates say should be prohibited (like classes of service and tiered pricing) would have some major bad unintended consequences and hinder innovation. Here's a post where I explain some of the issues, and here's one and here's another where I correct some misstatements by net neutrality advocates and point to accurate resources. The number one study that anyone who wants to be informed on this issue should read is the Stifel/Nicolaus analyst report titled "Value Chain Tug of War." They are right on the money about the interplay between the various interests, what leverage the telcos actually have to do harm (two places: last mile and in Washington, D.C., which they exercise huge control over), and what are likely outcomes. If this plays out through market competition, the telcos will lose again. If it plays out through government regulation, that's the telcos' home turf.
1 reply
It's a pity that most of the advocates of net neutrality simply don't understand the current technology, law, or politics of how the Internet functions, and are making lots of erroneous claims based on that misinformation. I don't entirely side with the telcos--they are clearly after their own interests here--but their statements generally tend to have more factual accuracy around them (except when they try to pretend this is an issue of backbone capacity rather than last-mile capacity). I've posted a number of entries at my blog trying to help sort out the facts. I think the basic principles of net neutrality in the FCC statement are quite reasonable, but I strongly disagree that the FCC is a good entity to start making detailed rules and regulations about what net neutrality means (these are the guys that regulate "indecent" content, remember!), and many of the things that net neutrality advocates say should be prohibited (like classes of service and tiered pricing) would have some major bad unintended consequences and hinder innovation. Here's a post where I explain some of the issues, and here's one and here's another where I correct some misstatements by net neutrality advocates and point to accurate resources. The number one study that anyone who wants to be informed on this issue should read is the Stifel/Nicolaus analyst report titled "Value Chain Tug of War." They are right on the money about the interplay between the various interests, what leverage the telcos actually have to do harm (two places: last mile and in Washington, D.C., which they exercise huge control over), and what are likely outcomes. If this plays out through market competition, the telcos will lose again. If it plays out through government regulation, that's the telcos' home turf.
1 reply