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Tricia
Hunter Valley, Australia
Learning to live better with less
Interests: simple living, sustainable living, conservation
Recent Activity
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Harvest season has begun for Australian garlic growers. Now is the ideal time to support our Australian garlic growers and buy a year’s supply of garlic. Here's some tips for where to buy your Australian garlic and how to store it properly. Continue reading
Posted Dec 10, 2014 at little eco footprints
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I’d like to take my connection with nature to the next level and learn a few bush survival skills. So I was pleased to discover Wildcraft Australia – a Hunter based wilderness survival school. Guides Nikki and Sam deliver courses in bush craft, survival skills, wild craft for kids, weaving, bush food, knife making, cord making and more... Continue reading
Posted Dec 1, 2014 at little eco footprints
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The festive season has evolved into a celebration of consumerism. Our household is trying to fight against the commercialisation of Christmas and downplay the tradition of gift-giving - but without being scrooges. One solution is to be more generous with our presence, rather than our presents. We've embraced traditions that help us connect instead of consume. My favourite festive season tradition is our creative countdown to Christmas... Continue reading
Posted Nov 25, 2014 at little eco footprints
Thats exciting Bek. What a wonderful Christmas gift for the girls. Enjoy.
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I cant wait Brydie. Its exciting watching the baby scoby form. I had a quick taste of the liquid the mother came in. It was very vinegary - so Im not sure what to expect.
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Good luck with your roosters Alisha. Hopefully youll have more courage than me ;-)
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Hi Jo. Thank you for your kind feedback. Sounds like your Clucker Tucker patch is ready to be refreshed. The perennials should last another season - but the annuals will be finishing. Id collect whatever seeds I could from the tall and brown plants. Pull out the dead plants and compost them. Let the chooks in to tidy up and then re-seed to fill the gaps. Or if theres not much worth saving - dig in whats left and add some manure - and then seed another batch. I hope that helps. Have fun.
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I imagine keeping it going over winter would be challenging Jane. It is such a summer drink. Im using loads of ginger in ours too. Delicious.
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I havnt tried kombucha yet Louise - so arent sure how they compare. I started my first batch of kombucha a few days ago - so Ill be able to compare soon. Let me know if you have any trouble finding grains locally. I can post you some dried grains if you dont have any luck. Although fresh grains are easiest.
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Hi Barry. Im not selling grains - but am happy to gift you some. If you cant find any fresh grains locally - I can post you some dried grains that can be easily rehydrated. If you forward me your postal address by responding to this email Ill pop some in the post. Tricia
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Is is the perfect summer drink Xan. Let me know if you have any trouble finding grains locally. Im going to try dehydrating some - and once dehydrated they are easy to post.
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I leave the fruit in and pop the bottle in the fridge as is. I simply strain off fruit when I pour, or leave it in and enjoy the chunks of fruit in my drink. If Im using dried ginger or cinnamon a layer settles on the bottom. Im careful not to disturb this layer when pouring. No need to drink on that day. It will keep in the fridge for weeks. Let me know if you cant find any grains locally, Im going to be drying some and am happy to post some. T
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Water kefir is a naturally fizzy fermented drink laden with probiotics. It is bubbly and refreshing like soft drink, but without the artificial ingredients and with far less sugar. The beneficial bacteria and yeast are an added bonus. Water kefir is easy to make. Here's a recipe. Continue reading
Posted Nov 16, 2014 at little eco footprints
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Our young Australorp hens have started to lay. We placed a dozen fertilised eggs in an incubator back in May, and the girls have just laid their first eggs. From egg to egg took six months. I appreciate the humble egg more than ever. Here's how to raise chickens from egg to egg.... Continue reading
Posted Nov 11, 2014 at little eco footprints
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My strawberry patch is bursting with sweet berries. If you manage your strawberry plants properly, you can enjoy homegrown berries forever, without having to buy new plants every few years. I'm sharing tips for growing organic strawberries in your backyard. Continue reading
Posted Nov 3, 2014 at little eco footprints
If you want a head start Im happy to give you one of our sweet potato heads Mel. Were driving to Newcastle on sat (via Janes). Are you far out of our way? Id be happy to drop one of as we have more than enough and it will save you a few weeks. T
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Wonderful tip thank you Cath and Duncan. Im going to give it a go. Isnt nature generous.
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Hi Leah. Yep - leave the starter outside/on kitchen bench for the first week or so. Put it in the fridge only after you are sure you have a happy active culture. And yes - tip most out so that it fits in your jar. You can use what you tip out as your first sponge or in a batch of pancakes. My jar is prob only around 400ml. It only needs to hold atleast two cups. Good luck :-)
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We are growing sweet potato slips on our windowsill. My daughter added faces to sweet potato tubers and we’re watching their roots, shoots and character grow. It’s an activity that combines creativity, nature study and growing your own food. Win-win. Here's how to grow your own sweet potato heads... Continue reading
Posted Oct 28, 2014 at little eco footprints
Minced, chopped or grated is good Chris. Enjoy.
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Hi Nic. Im pleased Ive made it seem uncomplicated. Good luck with your bread making. Id love to hear how it went. T
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Hi Leah. I started out using unbleached white bakers flour from the supermarket. The Wallaby Unbleached Bakers Flour avail in 5kg bags is an economical choice (works out at around 80c a loaf). Ive since started buying organic grains. Im now using a mix of wholewheat, rye and spelt. Wholegrain flours are the healthiest option (and also seem more tolerant of the long proof times I prefer). I found for my family that the best approach was to take it gradually. Starting with the white flour and slowly increasing the amount of wholegrain flour. They will now happily eat super brown loaves made from rye - but if I jumped straight to such a heavy loaf I imagine I may have turned them off sourdough. Have fun experimenting and I imagine you will find a flour mix that suits your tastes and routine. T
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Im glad the bread making is going well Angela. Ive been making plenty of fruit-loaf style breads lately as well. Ive been adding cinnamon, ginger, sultanas, dates and almonds to my basic sourdough bread. Delicious! I started water kefir only this week. Ive been adding ginger and orange slices to the second ferment. Its just like a punchy ginger beer. I suspect we are going to be drinking a lot of water kefir this summer. Thanks for sharing :-)
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An easy and frugal way to improve your garden soil is to grow green manure. Green manures are plants grown specifically to be composted back into the soil. They build organic matter and increase the availability of nitrogen and other nutrients. For me, their main appeal is they suit my lazy gardening style. Sowing a handful of seed, and turning the crop into the soil a month later, is far easier than bringing in barrow-loads of compost Continue reading
Posted Oct 20, 2014 at little eco footprints
I hope you do give it another go Kate. Ive found my sourdough improved once I relaxed into the process and forgot about some of the rules and time frames. I believe sourdough cultures are affected by our energy - so being frazzled about the process doesnt help. Perhaps you can start with someone elses starter to begin with? Im not sure where you are - but if you are in/near the hunter valley region Im happy to give you some starter. Tricia
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