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Tricia
Hunter Valley, Australia
Learning to live better with less
Interests: simple living, sustainable living, conservation
Recent Activity
My chooks love to eat the leaves too. I figure it wouldnt be good for them (or my rhubarb) in the long term - so i keep them away from it. One day they got out in and stripped the leaves bare. It didnt seem to cause them any harm in the short term. But i wouldnt want then to do it too often.
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I stew in orange juice and a little honey Kariane. No sugar. The citrus seems to lesson the amount of added sweet needed. I only add around 1 tablespoon of honey for a big bunch of rhubarb. I also spotted some lamb and rhubarb savory dishes Id like to try one day.
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Hi Ellie. My kefir grains have been sleeping in the fridge while we move house etc. Im planning to wake them up in the next week or two. When they are up and running again Ill catch up on grain requests. Be in touch soon. T
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Rhubarb is one worthwhile garden plant. It’s beautiful, hardy, low-maintenance and delicious. I especially love that you plant it once and, if you care for your patch properly, you can be harvesting rhubarb indefinitely. Right now – late winter and into early spring – is a good time to plant rhubarb. Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at little eco footprints
I think theyll listen Karine - because (unfortunately) money talks. Where we shop can make a difference.
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I loved your post about connecting with your community Sophie. Yes - Bring back the village! xxx
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Well done for being almost supermarket free Jane. And i totally understand your feelings about Westfields. I think Ive been probably once in five years - and only because i couldnt avoid it. Awful places designed to do nothing but encourage spending :-(
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I want to stop talking to machines. Only a few years ago, talking computers were rare. These days I find myself being forced into a conversation with a machine far too often. I'm starting to envisage a future where our days are devoid of casual chats and instead are full of frustrating interactions with computers. It’s a vision I don’t like. Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at little eco footprints
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Hi Michele. I crush them (with my fingers) and then simply scatter it on the ground in their pen. They enjoy pecking it up. Your chickens will love the treat. T Tricia Hogbin http://www.littleecofootprints.com/ mob. 0403462543
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I think you are right. How could i have missed him :-)
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Our great-grandparents didn't have slow cookers to make their life easier. But they may have had something similar – a box of hay. Haybox cooking involved placing a hot pot of food in a nest of hay and leaving it... Continue reading
Posted Jul 19, 2015 at little eco footprints
You can still do it in winter Bonnie - it may just take a little longer for the starter to be fully active. Theres yeast present on the flour and still plenty of yeast and bacteria in the air. Find a warm spot in your home and you should be right. Enjoy.
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Thats a handy tip to know thank you Caro x
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I'm feeling very grateful for the healing power of plants. I've been using comfrey leaves to soothe a sore back and have been surprised by how well it works. Comfrey is not only a useful medicinal herb – it can also be used in the garden to improve and fertilise soil. My love for comfrey is stronger than ever and I'm determined to grow as much of this useful plant as I can. Continue reading
Posted Jul 15, 2015 at little eco footprints
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Chickens naturally stop laying in winter. But we've passed the winter solstice and it's time for my girls to get back on the lay. Here's some natural tips for encouraging hens to lay. Continue reading
Posted Jun 28, 2015 at little eco footprints
Hi kim. Ive been super pleased with the hay bale edging. So worth trying - especially if you have some spoilt hay only good for mulching. T x
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Lucky goats Linda. Its a useful plant that tagasaste. Unfortunately from what i can tell it doesnt do that well in my climate. Im having fun making a list of native fodder trees at the moment.
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You shouldnt feel guilty at all Bron. I do appreciate your perspective. You reminded me how important the blog is to me - and helped me realise that giving it a little focused love every now and then is something i want to aim for. I do feel like instagram has made me less likely to share the personal insights on this space. ...as i seem to do most of that over on IG these days. xx
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Thank you Rachel. So true - my life is what inspires my writing. It wouldnt be very sensible to live less just so that I can write more. Hopefully (after continuing to simplify and declutter my schedule) Ill find spare time :-)
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Congratulations on your retirement Rainer. Im certain you will be missed after such a worthwhile career. But Im also certain you will find plenty of important things to do. Lovely to hear from you. Cheers, Tricia
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Time is precious. It’s a limited resource and I'm guessing most of us feel like we don’t have enough of it. One of the techniques I use to save time is function stacking – a permaculture concept that can save time and resources in the garden and beyond. Continue reading
Posted Jun 21, 2015 at little eco footprints
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Ho to make sweet-smelling natural citrus and beeswax fire starters. Continue reading
Posted Jun 10, 2015 at little eco footprints
Hi Tricia, tamara (fotopixie@me.com) has left you a comment: Wonderful post and striking timing as I sit down at my computer to weed through things I no longer want to see/do/read/spend time with. Thanks for that. :) Status: Published Options: Unpublish
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Im glad you liked it Jayne. Wishing you a weekend full of important things to do :-) T
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Thank you Kate. Im so pleased you enjoyed it. Im guessing that mapping out your ideal day and clarifing what you want your legacy to be well help you stop worrying about how others perceive you. I found that once I recognised what was truly important to me - other peoples perception of my actions/decisions became irrelevant. This makes learning how to say no easier. Enjoy and take your time. And dont feel guilty about devoting hours to mapping out your ideas on paper. It will be worth it.
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