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Ghosts of Home: The Afterlife of Czernowitz
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Memory Studies 4(3) 336–352Book reviews © The Author(s) 2011 Reprints and permission: sagepub. co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav DOI: 10.1177/1750698011403118 mss.sagepub.com Marianne Hirsch and Leo Spitzer Ghosts of Home:The Afterlife of Czernowitz in Jewish Memory. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010. 392pp. $39.95. ISBN 9790520257726 Reviewed by: Judith Friedlander, Hunter College, CUNY, USA Ghosts of Home reconstructs the memories of Jews who survived the Second World War in Czernowitz (Cern••u••i), a city located in Northern Bukowina, which belonged to Romania during most of the war. Known as Chernivtsi today, the city now is part of Ukraine. Generally speaking, the Jews of Romania survived the... Continue reading
Ghosts of Home: The Afterlife of Czernowitz in Jewish Memory, by Marianne Hirsch and Leo Spitzer. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010. 362 pp. $39.95. Only a few readers of the word “Czernowitz” will think of a present-day city in the Ukraine such as Lviv, Charkiv, or Kiev. Since “Czernowitz” is the German language version of Chernivtsi, for many a myth will come to mind, a myth that has to do with the poets Paul Celan and Rose Ausländer, with numerous newspapers in the city’s languages of Yiddish, Romanian, Ukrainian, Polish, and German, with the place of Erwin Chargaff, Joseph... Continue reading
Ghosts of Home is now out in paperback from the University of California Press. You can order it here. We would like this blog to serve as a site to announce and describe events connected to "Ghosts of Home," to Czernowitz and the Bukowina, and to other East European cities and towns that were once home to sizable Jewish populations. We invite readers to comment on the book and on the postings and events. Continue reading
Please click on the link below: http://www.tikkun.org/article.php/november2010ezrahi Continue reading
Holocaust studies / Inevitable fragments of nostalgia - Haaretz Daily Newspaper http://www.ghostsofhome.com/blog/2010/07/haaretz-review-by-leon-botstein.html Ghosts of Home: The Afterlife of Czernowitz in Jewish Memory by Marianne Hirsch and Leo Spitzer University of California Press, 392 pages, $39.95 As time goes by, the Holocaust and the ordinary lives lived by Jews throughout Central Europe before the 1930s recede as experience remembered. The witnesses and survivors diminish in number dramatically each year. But even for survivors who were young when the war ended in 1945, the trauma of expulsion, flight and brutalization was compounded by the exceptional fate of survival in the face of... Continue reading
Ghosts and memories from an unforgotten cultural city, April 1, 2010 By Paul Gelman "PAUL Y. GELMAN" (HAIFA , ISRAEL) - See all my reviews Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?) This review is from: Ghosts of Home: The Afterlife of Czernowitz in Jewish Memory (Hardcover) First a confession.My mother was born in Bukowina and spent most of her youth in Czenowitz.She used -and still uses- to tell me various stories from that dark period of the years 1940-1945.From time to time I let her know about some new items, articles or things that appear about Czernowitz.There are many things she has... Continue reading
Ghosts of Home: The Afterlife of Czernowitz in Jewish Memory by Marianne Hirsch and Leo Spitzer. University of California Press, 392 pages, $39.95. Reviewed by Monica Szurmuk http://www.theworld.org/2010/04/07/world-books-review-memorable-ghosts-of-home/ Almost a decade ago historian Natalie Zemon Davis wrote about the differences in the “hunger” to know about the past, positing a conflict between the descendants of those who had suffered a traumatic experience and the curiosity of the professional historian, who came to the same material with different questions. Aware of this emotional gap, historians and cultural critics have been grappling with finding ways to tell compelling stories that are true... Continue reading
Dear Marianne, and Leo I finally finished reading. I enjoyed it a lot, Such an impressive undertaking! So well written so moving, eloquent, and flowing. I think you managed to take this particular place and make it and what happened there something of universal interest. I was a bit concerned that it will be too “academically” oriented and thus maybe detached and even dry but I found the total opposite. So thanks and congratulations! L, Dave Continue reading
Dear Marianne and Leo, I wanted to write and tell you how moved I was reading your new book. It is an extraordinary text. In many ways it is Marianne’s Hotel Bolivia but also different. As a joint effort, indeed, a collective effort, it makes vivid and compelling the challenges of engaging in postmemory especially in relation to this most complicated place. Here postmemory for the second generation is a profoundly indirect and deeply mediated project. Czernowitz is multiply deferred making access that much more difficult. It was already lost as your parents lived it. The book does not shy... Continue reading
http://www.cjh.org/programs/programarchives.php?vid=20100308czernowitz.mp4 On the evening of March 8, the two of us, together with Susannah Heschel, scholar of Jewish culture and a descendant of Hasidic rabbinic families from Sadagora, Norman Manea, Romanian-born author of Hooligan’s Return, and Boris Sandler, editor of the Yiddish Forverts and author/producer of a new documentary on Yiddish Czernowitz, spoke on a panel inspired by our book and titled “Czernowitz in Jewish Memory.” Historian Atina Grossman moderated. The program took place at the Center for Jewish History in New York, and was sponsored by the CJH, the Leo Baeck Institute, and YIVO. The Austrian Cultural Forum of... Continue reading
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Mar 16, 2010
It was in desperation that I began reading "Ghosts of Home: The After Life of Czernowitz in Jewish Memeory." My 101-year-old father was suffering from a deep depression. The woman he'd shared his life with for seven years had died, leaving him bereft, nearly blind and terribly hearing-impaired. My father, a cultured former physician who'd left New York City in the 1930s to go to medical school in Vienna and who still spoke Yiddish and German fluently was stricken by the fact that he'd simply lived too long. He sat on his sofa sighing, speaking little and wanting only to... Continue reading
We gave an informal talk about Czernowitz past and Chernivtsi present to members of the Columbia University Oral History graduate seminar. You can watch it on You Tube. http://www.youtube.com/user/columbiauniversity#g/c/AF873CE0C5C3B5D5 Continue reading
Ghosts of Home: The Afterlife of Czernowitz in Jewish Memory http://ucberkeleyenglish.com/?p=393 In what follows, graduate student John Lurz reports on a recent event held at University Press Books at which Marianne Hirsch and Leo Spitzer spoke about their new book, Ghosts of Home: The Afterlife of Czernowitz in Jewish Memory. *** On a rainy Thursday evening last week, I had the pleasure of squishing – along with almost forty other people – into the cozy back room at University Press Books on Bancroft Avenue in Berkeley. People filled the chairs lining the room and overflowed onto the staircase leading up... Continue reading
From History PhD Student Svetlana Fruntchak, University of Toronto I have just finished reading your wonderful book that I have been awaiting for a long time. In the midst of writing my own dissertation on post-war Chernivtsi, I am of course overwhelmed by thoughts and emotions. As I was reading your book, I thought that it is in a way a written monument to Czernowitz. This is, in fact, how I think about my own research also. Your book is just what I was expecting: the artful restoration of the complex and multifaceted “multimemory” of pre-war Czernowitz from the enormous... Continue reading
Marianne: The city where I grew up during the 1950’s, Bucharest, in Romania, was shadowed by another place, Czernowitz -- my parents’ native city that they had fled just a few years earlier. For my friends, and me all children of exiled Czernowitzers, this was our origin and, dare I say, our “home.” Although none of us had ever been there, its tastes, attitudes, and behaviors shaped us profoundly. And, strangely, the streets, buildings and natural surroundings of Czernowitz—its theaters, restaurants, parks, rivers and domestic settings, none of which I had ever myself seen, heard, or smelled—figure more strongly in... Continue reading
Our book is out and available for order at a reduced price through the publisher or on-line book dealers like Amazon and Barnes and Noble. Save 20% on "Ghosts of Home" at ucpress.edu To save, add the book to the shopping cart, enter code 09W9108 in the source code field and click update to calculate your savings. We would like this blog to serve as a site to announce and describe events connected to "Ghosts of Home," to Czernowitz and the Bukowina, and to other East European cities and towns that were once home to sizable Jewish populations. We invite... Continue reading