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Luke Honey
London
Antiques & Fine Art Dealer and Writer. Unhealthy interest in second-hand books and unreliable cars. Loves gin and backgammon, loathes mashed potato.
Recent Activity
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Scotland in August! Heather. Haggis. Single Malts. Stalking. Tartan. Fingal's Cave. Deep Fried Mars Bar. Midges. And here's another find to add to the list: Balmoral Chicken. Strangely- for a Scotophile, I had never come across it before, only learning... Continue reading
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One more post about curry. Then I will shut up. You will remember, dear reader, that in the last post we were flirting with the charms of British Indian Restaurant Cookery. I tried a recipe or two from Undercover Curry... Continue reading
Others may well agree with you. However, I find that BIR vary enormously in quality. Many are appalling (The Mayfair Tandoori please step forward), while others are actually rather good (Kennington Tandoori, Holy Cow, the excellent Hot Stuff in Vauxhall). I would be interested to know if Hot Stuff uses a base gravy, or if they use completely different- and possibly more authentic- techniques.
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Gastronauts- a question for you this fine, sunny, July morning. Do you have a thing about takeaway curry? A secret addictive vice? Go on. Admit it. It's gloriously tacky, I know, unquestionably laddish, and possibly, no probably, horribly fattening (more... Continue reading
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Over the years I've managed to amass a large collection of cookery books without even really thinking about it. It's easy to forget once popular books languishing at the back of the shelf. I had forgotten about Raymond Blanc's Cooking... Continue reading
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I like pop-ups restaurants. They're creative. They're fun. They're slightly bonkers. So I don't think it's especially clever to be too hard on them. You're eating food cooked in a garage or shed-like environment; look- it's not exactly The Ritz... Continue reading
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It's crunchy. It's spicy. It's horribly addictive. It's laced, I suspect, with our old friend, Mr Monosodium Glutamate. It comes in those little bags from the local corner shop. It's Bombay Mix. The Queen's a fan. Apparently she draws lines... Continue reading
That's terrific news. It's in the all-time favourite list.
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Roald Dahl with Cartier cigarette. It's odd that I haven't written about Roald Dahl before. Perhaps I have been waiting for the right moment. Like so many others reared on "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" or "James and the Giant... Continue reading
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I'm back. And itching to write about all things rook. Yup, the good old Corvus frugilegus. I've always had a thing about that very particular sound rooks make; it's very English: a croaking, cawing noise so typical of a raw... Continue reading
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We're almost there with our stand at the Battersea Decorative Antiques Fair which opens this Tuesday (29th April 2014). Please join us for cocktails and canapés on Tuesday evening. It's been a terrific amount of hard work, all slightly bonkers-... Continue reading
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I hope you'll forgive me if I write a quick post about my up-coming stand at the Battersea Decorative Antique Fair in London. In my other life- that is when I'm not dreaming or thinking about food, I'm an antique... Continue reading
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Here's a recipe for an excellent- and aromatic- chicken curry which I've based on a version in Manju Malhi's recommended book, Brit Spice. It's similar-in a way- to the chicken curries of the Punjab in Northern India. I like the... Continue reading
Just posted it- so have a look. Your salty first course does sound like a Southern thing. I'm beginning to appreciate Southern Food (courtesy of your excellent recommendation, Peacock & Love- and more of that later), but don't you think a first course should be a light appetiser sort of thing- something tempting to get you in mood for what is to come? The French are very good at this with their amuse bouches. Yup, savouries are served right at the very end. In place of all those nursery, suety, curranty, custardy puddings.
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I'm not sure why I haven't written about Bath Olivers before, as they're a very Greasy Spoon thing. "Fortt's Bath Olivers". The most elegant biscuit ever created, in my opinion: generously large, soft to the touch, light on the taste,... Continue reading
Hi Peak of Chic Indeed. But remember that in Olde England savouries were actually eaten after the main course, instead of a pudding. You could, of course, also use them as a first course, but I suspect these old recipes might be a bit too salty- and not light enough. A seriously retro 1960's recipe which I quite like is "Iced Camembert", similar to the "Cheese Ice", above. Served with Bath Olivers and Celery Stalks, this makes a good pudding course. Can you get Bath Olivers in America? Now that would make a good post. Watch this Space.