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Luke Honey
London
Antiques & Fine Art Dealer and Writer. Unhealthy interest in second-hand books and unreliable cars. Loves gin and backgammon, loathes mashed potato.
Recent Activity
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Here's a recipe for an excellent- and aromatic- chicken curry which I've based on a version in Manju Malhi's recommended book, Brit Spice. It's similar-in a way- to the chicken curries of the Punjab in Northern India. I like the... Continue reading
Just posted it- so have a look. Your salty first course does sound like a Southern thing. I'm beginning to appreciate Southern Food (courtesy of your excellent recommendation, Peacock & Love- and more of that later), but don't you think a first course should be a light appetiser sort of thing- something tempting to get you in mood for what is to come? The French are very good at this with their amuse bouches. Yup, savouries are served right at the very end. In place of all those nursery, suety, curranty, custardy puddings.
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I'm not sure why I haven't written about Bath Olivers before, as they're a very Greasy Spoon thing. "Fortt's Bath Olivers". The most elegant biscuit ever created, in my opinion: generously large, soft to the touch, light on the taste,... Continue reading
Hi Peak of Chic Indeed. But remember that in Olde England savouries were actually eaten after the main course, instead of a pudding. You could, of course, also use them as a first course, but I suspect these old recipes might be a bit too salty- and not light enough. A seriously retro 1960's recipe which I quite like is "Iced Camembert", similar to the "Cheese Ice", above. Served with Bath Olivers and Celery Stalks, this makes a good pudding course. Can you get Bath Olivers in America? Now that would make a good post. Watch this Space.
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One part Gin. One part Red Vermouth. One part Campari. Serve on the rocks with a twist of orange. Its origins are unclear. Count Camillo Negroni is supposed to have asked his barman to replace the soda in his Americano... Continue reading
Alison Thanks. I love figs. I really liked the sound of the Elizabeth David fig and orange recipe, would be interested to hear what you thought of it, if you decide to try it out. Yes, I fear our book collection is out of control. Now running to about four thousand. But I do think that the amount of pleasure a second hand book can give you- for a few pounds- even a few pence- is phenomenal- and one of the great pleasures in life.
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I've been meaning to write about Olof Wijk's 'Eat at Pleasure Drink by Measure' for some time now. This is another long forgotten book, which, like yesterday's 'Clubland Cooking', you can buy online for a pittance. If I had to... Continue reading
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I bought this charming- and splendidly crusty- little book for a few pounds in a second hand bookshop. It's called Clubland Cooking by Robin McDouall, published in 1974 by Phaidon. I've just twigged that it's in the same series as... Continue reading
Yes. I am obsessed with 'kidron'. You might also remember those wonderful book club ads for Dennis Wheatley novels in The Sunday Times Magazine: "Dare you savour the luxury of tooled kidron?" "It's sinful"!
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It's easy with hindsignt to imagine what career path you might have taken, if say, the course of events had led you down a different path. I quite like the idea of marketing spirits and liquers, especially if (through some... Continue reading
I've just been talking to Mrs Aitch about this. London has changed and I miss the slightly louche- and eccentric- London that used to exist, until fairly recently. London is different now- very international and exciting in it's way. But it's a different place. Bland. And I hate those stretch limos you see cruising around on a Saturday Night. With drunken PR Girls holding bottles of champagne through the electric windows. It's not how London should be! It's all wrong! Bring back The Fog!
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From left to right: Maria, Alexandra, Alexei, Tatiana, Nicholas II, Olga, Anastasia, 1911 It all started with an email. From a German tea company peddling a new product; a variation on the ubiquitous tea-bag. "Please send me the Earl Grey... Continue reading
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Mrs Aitch gave this to me this morning; as a present for Valentine's Day. Venus in the Kitchen or Love's Cookery Book was first published in 1952, edited by Norman Douglas (the subversive author of South Wind) and with an... Continue reading
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"Just a Beaujolais sir, but a good bottler..." The Servant (1963) One of my earliest restaurant memories is being taken by my grandfather to The London Steak House, somewhere near the old Roman Wall in the City of London. We... Continue reading
Sounds delicious, although the haddock/cider combination sounds unusual? I'm a massive fan of the use of cider in cookery- Mussels in cider is infinitely preferable, I think, to Mussels cooked in wine. And Mulled Cider is a huge improvement on Mulled Wine. Less acidic.
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I've got mixed feelings about old Sir Terence. I still can't make up my mind about the rather empty, sparse Design Museum; loathed Mezzo (a formulaic joint for raucous Essex Girls up for a Night on the Town) and Quaglino's,... Continue reading
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Mrs Aitch is making marmalade- as I write this. She makes it every year, and there's this terrific wait for the Seville oranges to arrive in England. Some years they arrive early, other years they arrive late. But January's the... Continue reading
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Not that the readers of The Greasy Spoon need any reminding: Lady Login's Traditional Haggis (1856) 1 cleaned sheep or lamb's paunch 2 lb (900g) dry oatmeal 1 lb (450g) Lamb's liver, boiled and minced 1 lamb's heart, boiled and... Continue reading
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The John F Kennedy Archives recently released a recipe for JFK's favourite fish chowder. It's a rather touching story. In 1961 a disabled girl called Lynn Jennings wrote to the President asking 'what he liked to eat'. The president's special... Continue reading