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Steven K. Mariner
Interests: Damn near everything.
Recent Activity
Ding! Got mine! As predicted, price went up to $15. I can haz geek now. (Yeah, because of course I've never been able to claim that before now... - Steve M.
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How We Roll ongoing sale: 8110 (live in 11h 58m) Current numbers (updated each minute) First sucker: MischievousGrin Speed to first woot: 0m 4.827s Last wooter to woot: Mordian7th Last purchase time: Thursday, February 19, 2009, 9:01:36 AM Central Time Order pace: 0m 10.835s Woots sold: 2999 Direct from the Shirt.Woot page for this shirt. Midnight I will be up and ready.
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SOLD OUT??????? Waaaaaaahhh!!!!!
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I have a sizeable number of the old 0-9x2 dice and won't be willingly parting with them. Getting new ones to match new die color schemes, though, is next to impossible. I love tiny tiny dice. I bought a couple fistfuls of them when they appeared in my friend's gaming store. Less than completely practical for regular gaming usage but a LOT quieter when playing BOD (Buckets O' Dice) games. I did find a special use for them when playing large-scale BattleTech games, though. The games take so long to play, especially when doing larger than Company-on-Company sized battles. The most common interruption in the game was "Has THIS 'Mech moved?"; the second most common interruption was "How far did THIS 'Mech move?"; third was "Did THIS 'Mech jump?". Nobody could get anything done while everyone sorted out their options matrices. Tiny tiny d6 dice to the rescue. After the 'Mech moved, we'd place the die in front of the 'Mech miniature (which indicated it had already moved) and set the die equal to its movement defense bonus, including the jump bonus. Since the highest movement defense bonus including jump is 5, a 6 meant zero bonus. It sped up monster games of BattleTech noticeably -- often cutting the game length in half. After the combat round, everyone picked up their dice and the game sped onward.
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2009 on one more from orccon at WWdN: In Exile
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I purchased one of the golf-ball-like d100s back when they came out, just for the novelty of it. They're very impractical; they never stop rolling. Or maybe I'm just a spaz. There was another type of d100, looked like a die inside a clear plastic ball or somesuch, I didn't get one of those. I think there might have been a bead inside that settled onto the number you rolled. Didn't appeal to me much. I preferred the old 20-sided numbered 0-9 twice for my percentiles, though. You can't hardly find them anymore; everyone seems to prefer the Susan B. Anthony dice (easily confused with 8-siders if you're in a hurry and it's dark). Ah, well. If it mattered enough to me, I'd create a company which manufactured them and then I could make them how I wanted. But the key point at the end of your story is absolutely true: Noone needs the d100, since a pair of d10s or psuedo-d20s is sufficient to the cause, and generally more practical. But then, I didn't need the monster nerf foam dice sets I purchased either, but they're good for a giggle about once every year or so...
Toggle Commented Feb 18, 2009 on one more from orccon at WWdN: In Exile
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Excellent rundown. And yet another repeat of the best wisdom in Life in general, but specifically on the Internet: You do your thing. I do my thing. If our things intersect, let's hope it's fun. - Steve M.
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I remember when the rules were just articles in Chainmail, and the endless Tolkein-vs-playability fights. Still have a photocopy of the first collective ruleset assembled from those articles. I always liked the Lizardmen; they figured predominantly in the first adventure I corralled each new group of players into in my campaign. After that they were on their own to decide where to go. For complexity, Rolemaster intensely detailed. For simplicity, I tend to not go any further than AD&D v1.0. Been a VERY long time since I played Basic D&D though. :: sigh :: Thanks for the prod toward a trip down memory lane.
Toggle Commented Sep 9, 2008 on Lizardmen live in the marshes at WWdN: In Exile
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I remember when the rules were just articles in Chainmail, and the endless Tolkein-vs-playability fights. Still have a photocopy of the first collective ruleset assembled from those articles. I always liked the Lizardmen; they figured predominantly in the first adventure I corralled each new group of players into in my campaign. After that they were on their own to decide where to go. For complexity, Rolemaster intensely detailed. For simplicity, I tend to not go any further than AD&D v1.0. Been a VERY long time since I played Basic D&D though. :: sigh :: Thanks for the prod toward a trip down memory lane.
Toggle Commented Sep 9, 2008 on Lizardmen live in the marshes at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply