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Melissa Esposito
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My apologies! You're right; in fact, I used it this morning to extend a reservation, and it worked like a charm.
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Ohhh, I love this! I wonder if I can transport a small secretary desk to my next show and use it to hold all my paper goods the way my most fanatic customer would. My trouble is that I'm car-free in DC, and manage to bring everything in a handcart via Metro most times. But I'm brewing up some break-downable ideas... I agree with Amanda Rae; I think some painted cardboard fronts for your table simulating an oven, a sink, cabinets, etc., would be lovely! You could use lightweight knobs and stabilizers on the backside to screw to the cardboard to make dials on the stove to hang your oven mitts from.
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My concern is how secure my credit card information would be with WMATA. I don't exactly have a lot of faith in some of their sometimes-less-than-scrupulous employees to not skim numbers off the system if the numbers need to be stored for any length of time before being processed.
Toggle Commented May 11, 2009 on Smart(er) Cards at CommuterPageBlog
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"It was heartening to see the bike valet program do so well although I can't imagine what it was like to bike into the city in the cold that morning." Biking in winter is a bit more daunting than other times of the year, but once you're over the initial idea that you're going to be cold, your movement keeps you warmer than plain old walking would. I think the only part of me that really was cold on the way downtown was my unexposed face (and a stretchy neckwarmer borrowed from my Coloradan boyfriend for the return trip helped negate that). I didn't wind up using the bike valets (too far from my silver ticket gate), but biking in was only a 30 minute trip, tops, as opposed to an hour-plus, tightly-packed nightmare on Metrorail. The streets were ciclovia-like in their emptiness of cars, but full of high-spirited pedestrians - we rang our bells at groups of people and got lots of cheers in response. And biking along a pedestrian-only I-395 was such a joyous experience! (I believe there's a video of me somewhere on the interweb doing figure 8's in the middle of the highway on the north end.) We wound up parking only 3 blocks from our intended destination, with plenty of poles to choose from. Lastly, it took almost no time to get home because I didn't have to contend with the crush of people flooding the downtown Metro stations and buses. Biking to a big event like that is definitely the way to go!
Toggle Commented Jan 28, 2009 on After the Party at CommuterPageBlog
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I can't tell you what Shane and Brandon might do with the information, Steve, but anyone with a Twitter account can technically send them a message through the system. I'm sure if it were valuable information, especially if no other volunteer had sent a similar updates, they would gladly distribute the info back out to followers. Only the registered volunteers they pick beforehand, however, will get any of the bonuses like the free book.
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This looks great, guys! I'm excited to see what awesome routing ideas will be coming from all the volunteers.
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"The only thing that will be missing is ice cream." Don't forget to add sunny weather to that list, but I'll probably be there just the same!
Toggle Commented Jan 8, 2009 on Bike-sharing Panel This Sunday at CommuterPageBlog
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I have a pinger because I'm cheap and it was free, but I agree the ringers are the most fun. However, I'm found most people don't care if I holler (in a friendly manner, of course) or use a bell -- they're often just surprised to have a cyclist letting them know they're there. I always try to thank them for scootching over if they look like they made an effort, too.
Toggle Commented Aug 18, 2008 on The Power of the Bike Bell at CommuterPageBlog
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First off, I'm really sorry to hear about your bike. I had my bike stolen in high school (from my own front porch, where it was locked, for cryin' out loud), and even if you didn't like the bike that much, it still totally sucks. Also, make sure you report it to the police whether or not you intend to file an insurance claim. The more bike thefts they know about, theoretically the more they'll do about them. Tell the management at the station, too, so they're aware of the need for secure bike parking. You can always change out the handlebar for something smaller, so don't let that be your major factor in choosing your next bike. If you're particularly worried about theft (which you have every right to be), I'd recommend just getting something from a thrift store for less than $50, test riding it to make sure nothing is majorly wrong with it, and having a bike shop look it over for you. Even if it takes a couple days to get it back, it's better than having a chain fall off on you or something. For the rough lots you're biking through, maybe some Kevlar tires would be a good investment. Even if the rest of the bike is inexpensive, having to replace your tubes would get to be a pain and it might be worth it to have nicer tires. Rough 'em up with some chalk or driving through a lot of dirt so they look less new and are less likely to be stolen, though. Lastly, as you probably learned, it's worth it to park it a few blocks away and lock it securely than it is to lock it less securely closer to your destination. Cutting the lock in front of all the cabbies and people that are there takes some nerve. Good luck finding a good replacement! And let us know when you do - we like pictures.
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It is! I love it. When I was looking I required fenders, step-through frame, and being upright. I named her Bianca, and she rides beautifully. I saw someone else with the same bike from afar on the Metro the other day, and I nearly fell over myself getting home to make sure she wasn't stolen. I may be a wee bit paranoid.
Toggle Commented Jul 11, 2008 on Enough said. at CommuterPageBlog
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I like to think having them in our cubes makes us participants in the nascent revolution.
Toggle Commented Jul 10, 2008 on Enough said. at CommuterPageBlog
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Kim, let's be honest: NOTHING really compares to my ride. ;) But yours is holding its own pretty well -- and it gets you where you want to go, right? And I agree; I feel much more connected to my neighborhood by walking and biking through it, and I notice so much more interesting details in other neighborhoods than I would if I were only in a vehicle. Beach Bum, that's awesome that so many people bike at your office! We have underground parking here, too, but it's a public garage, and I just would kick myself if something was taken off of her when I could have brought her upstairs. I had a bike stolen in high school, and it's not an experience I want to repeat. If we had something with either an attendant next to it or a camera (with signs advertising it), I might feel better about it. As is, it doesn't take up too much room, and it certainly is more interesting than the gray cube wall!
Toggle Commented Jul 10, 2008 on Enough said. at CommuterPageBlog
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I remember reading a study this spring about how bicyclists spent money. Worried business owners whose street parking was being taken away for bike parking found that instead of business decreasing, bike-riding customers were more likely to come to their store and spent more money than their car-driving counterparts. I think there are three important factors that lead to this outcome. 1) Bicyclists have more disposable income because they (often) don't have car payments. 2) Bicyclists have to shop more frequently because they can't buy in bulk and so have more frequent opportunities to make impulse purchases. 3) Bicyclists are more likely to prefer to spend their money at local shops rather than larger corporate chains. When cars aren't blocking your view of the buildings on the block, you're more likely to notice interesting shops that you'd otherwise not glance at. I think the businesses worried about slow sales should embrace this. If they put merchandise outside and lure people in, then they can gain many new, hopefully repeat customers.
Toggle Commented Jun 19, 2008 on No Car Zone...in NYC?! at CommuterPageBlog
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I'm going more for sustainable vehicle parking in the if-you-build-it-they-will-come mentality. I have seen those for cars, though, and they are pretty darn neat. (More importantly, you could be in the vehicle when it does its fun ride through the maze of robotics, and I doubt you could be on the bike to see the inner workings.) However, I supposed if you had to build a parking garage, I'd rather have the space-saving footprint of one of those than the sprawling asphalt jungles we're so used to.
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I didn't think of Japan as being particularly auto-unfriendly when I visited about ten years ago, but I also was staying in a small town near Kochi (Tosayamada, which has since been merged into Kami). The family I lived with gave me a bike to use, but I didn't think of that as weird because I already rode a bike to school in the states. (For being made by stereotypically small people, though, that bike was huge; I could barely make it on in my skirts.) I remember the roads being narrow, and they had the mirrors up on the corners to help people see each other around corners and I wished that we had those in the states; since the bike was so hard to get onto, and since I didn't want to give more of a show in my skirts than was necessary, I was grateful for them so I didn't have to get on and off at each corner if traffic was clear. Talking to the girls who lived there, they were amazed I had my driver's license already and some showed what I perceived then as an abnormal ambivalence about getting their own when they were of age. I wish now I'd paid more attention to gas prices and the like while I was there for comparison purposes. But we did go to Osaka and took the train to Kyoto, and the public transportation there was amazing, especially compared to ye olde bus system in Pinellas County, Florida, where I was living at the time. I think that started my love affair with transit.
Toggle Commented Mar 28, 2008 on Cars =/= Cool? at CommuterPageBlog
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I think the truncated blue line works if there is a silver line to take up the slack. There's still the yellow line for anyone who's going through L'Enfant to downtown, and people commuting from Alexandria to the Wilson corridor would already have to transfer to the orange line. The only folks really affected by such a shift would be people in Alexandria/southern Arlington who worked at one of the three stations between Rosslyn and Metro Center -- and if the silver line existed as proposed, a lot of them might be closer to their offices if they took that instead.
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